News

+  St. Paul Port Authority Midway Business ..., October 11, 2017

St. Paul Port Authority Midway Business Center Wins NAIOP Award of Excellence

October 11, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (October 11, 2017) –  The Saint Paul Port Authority and United Properties’ Midway Business Center in St. Paul, MN received a 2017 Award of Excellence in the Light Industrial – High Finish category from NAIOP Commercial Real Estate Development Association’s Minnesota Chapter.

LHB designed the multi-tenant office warehouse that was the first of its kind in the nation to receive LEED CS-Silver pre-certification. The 190,000 square-foot project, located where the former Saint’s stadium buildings stood, included an extensive brownfield site remediation plan, including a complex stormwater treatment system. The building also features a 40 KwH photovoltaic system that produces enough energy to power the building exterior and parking lot lighting.

To learn more about the project, visit: http://www.lhbcorp.com/project/sppa-united-properties-saints-business-center/

Founded in 1975, NAIOP Minnesota has been a major factor in the growth of Minnesota-based businesses and a significant contributor to the economic well-being of the hundreds of local communities in which our members work and invest. To see the full list of award recipients, visit: http://bit.ly/2yHNXwV

+  LHB Announces New Hires, September 26, 2017

LHB Announces New Hires

September 26, 2017

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices: 

Michael Lamb, AICP joins the Minneapolis Office as the Urban Design & Planning Leader. Michael has over 30 years of experience in the design and planning of cities, neighborhoods, and districts. His project experience includes design and planning for town and commercial centers, neighborhoods, academic and corporate campus plans, small area plans, and transit design. Lamb holds a Master of Architecture degree in Urban Design from the University of Colorado Denver, and is credentialed by the American Institute of Certified Planners.

Rachel Johnson joins the Duluth Office as a Landscape Architect Designer. Rachel joins LHB with a Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Minnesota and has previous work experience as an urban designer.

 

 

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognitions ..., September 13, 2017

LHB Announces Professional Recognitions and New Hires

September 13, 2017

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (September 13, 2017) –  LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following employee recognitions and new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

Aaron Kelly, AIA, LEED AP has been chosen to participate in the 2017-2018 Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Duluth Program. Designed to identify, orient, develop and network existing and emerging leaders, Leadership Duluth inspires participants to take an active role in ensuring the health and prosperity of our area. Leadership Duluth educates participants about Duluth’s cultural and business history, along with current issues facing the region. Leader of LHB’s Government Group, Aaron is a highly-experienced­ architect with diverse project experience and proven leadership abilities on public projects. Aaron has direct experience in master planning, design leadership, construction administration, project management, and team organization.

Jeremy Clarke, PE has been chosen to participate in the 2017-2018 Twin Cities Leadership Program. Leadership Twin Cities is a nine-month series that informs people about the critical issues facing our community and to discuss solutions to the problems. Its focus is to inform and inspire future leaders – and challenge them to make a difference through personal commitment and involvement. Jeremy, a Senior Structural Project Engineer at LHB, has 20 years of experience specializing in structural engineering design and analysis in the industrial sector.

Rob Downs III has been chosen to join the Leadership Superior/Douglas County Advisory Board. Rob graduated from the 2016-2017 Leadership class. Established in 1991, the Superior/Douglas County Leadership Program is an annual program for approximately 25-30 emerging and existing leaders who want to be involved in improving the community and shaping its future. Participants represent a cross-section of the urban and rural communities of Douglas County and have diverse backgrounds and interests. Rob is a Business Analyst at LHB and an active member of the Superior community.

 Heather Stedron, LEED Green Assoc. joins the Minneapolis Office as a Designer in the Government Group. Heather has five years of experience in educational, healthcare and civic architecture projects. She received her Master of Architecture from Portland State University.

Jeff Hemer, AIA, LEED AP joins the Minneapolis Office as an Architect. Jeff has over 18 years of experience designing federal, municipal, institutional, educational, and residential projects. A licensed architect in Minnesota, he is also a qualified State of Minnesota residential energy auditor.

Mike Kochaniuk joins the Duluth Office as a Senior Technician. Mark has over 30 years of experience in surveying, drafting, staking, and bridge inspection.

Benjamin Huninghake joins the Cambridge Office as a Civil Designer. Ben graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering.

Duane Battisti joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Scheduler. Duane has 10 years of project scheduling experience.

+  LHB Named Star Tribune Top 150 Workplace, September 13, 2017

LHB Named Star Tribune Top 150 Workplace

September 13, 2017

 

TW 2017 Top 150 Clr Logo_N3_resized_xsmLHB has been named one of the Top 150 Workplaces in Minnesota by the Star Tribune.

“We strive to provide our clients with highly talented staff who are motivated to help achieve their project goals. Participating in this survey was a helpful way to assess and identify priorities as we focus on retaining our valued staff and attracting talented new employees to our company,” noted LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, PE.

Top Workplaces recognizes the most progressive companies in Minnesota based on employee opinions measuring engagement, organizational health and satisfaction. The analysis included responses from over 69,000 employees at Minnesota public, private and nonprofit organizations.

Star Tribune Publisher Michael J. Klingensmith said, “The companies in the
Star Tribune Top 150 Workplaces deserve high praise for creating the very best work environments in the state of Minnesota. My congratulations to each of these exceptional companies.”

To qualify for the Star Tribune Top Workplaces, a company must have more than 50 employees in Minnesota. Over 2,000 companies were invited to participate. Rankings were composite scores calculated purely on the basis of employee responses collected by WorkplaceDynamics, an independent company specializing in employee engagement and retention. A complete list of those selected is available at StarTribune.com/topworkplaces2017.

 

 

 

 

+  LHB Announces New Hires, Promotions, and..., July 5, 2017

LHB Announces New Hires, Promotions, and Professional Recognitions

July 5, 2017

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (June 19, 2017) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following professional recognitions, promotions, and new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

Group GraphicRecognitions

Erica Christenson, PLA recently obtained her SITES AP accreditation. The SITES Accredited Professional establishes a common framework to define the profession of sustainable landscape design and development. It provides landscape professionals with the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge, expertise and commitment to the profession. Erica is an award-winning designer who is enthusiastic about campuses and cultural institutions and has designed numerous parks, college quads, and interpretive projects in the Twin Cities. Her design approach reflects the client’s needs and responds to the potential opportunities that each project and site brings. Learn more about Erica on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erica-christenson-5bb5434

Promotions

Kavwimba Mdumuka joined the Minneapolis Office in 2016 and is now working as a Designer in the Integrative Design Team. Kavwimba graduated from the University of Minnesota with his Master of Architecture degree, and the University of Kentucky with his Bachelor of Arts degree in Architecture. He was one of four recipients to win a 2017 Richard Morrill Master’s Final Project Award from the University of Minnesota’s School of Architecture. Kav’s winning Master’s of Architecture final project was for the design of an elementary school. https://www.linkedin.com/in/kavwimba-mdumuka-50a1a298/

Lindsey Kieffaber joined the Minneapolis Office in 2015 and is now working as a Designer in the Integrative Design Team. Lindsey graduated from the University of Minnesota with her Master of Architecture degree, and Bryn Mawr College with dual Bachelor of Arts degrees in Philosophy, and Growth and Structure of Cities. Between her undergraduate and graduate education, Lindsey worked for Habitat for Humanity of Eastern Connecticut (Habitat ECT); where she project-managed 19 homes and was responsible for developing and improving the sustainability measures implemented on all homes built by Habitat ECT. https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindsey-kieffaber-b56587a/

Mauricio Leon joined the Minneapolis Office in 2016 and is now working as an Energy and Climate Specialist in the Integrative Design Team. Mauricio recently graduated from the University of Minnesota with his Master’s degree in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (STEP). He provides LHB clients with sustainability-related research and advice. Mauricio has experience on energy policy, statistics, economics, and developing web-based applications as well as other software and programming skills. https://www.linkedin.com/in/leonx075/

New Hires

James Schultz, PE, returns to the Duluth Office as a Minnesota licensed Electrical Engineer. He has over 13 years of electrical engineering, design, and project management experience for a variety of industry markets including food production/packaging, pulp and paper, mining, and power. https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-schultz-6954478/

Aimee Allen joins the Minneapolis Office as an Intern. Aimee is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan Technological University (MTU). She runs as a member of the MTU Varsity Track and Field Team where she helped set four school relay records. https://www.linkedin.com/in/aimee-allen-886295b4/

Miguel Proa joins the Minneapolis Office as an Intern. Miguel is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Northern Illinois University. He is an active member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). https://www.linkedin.com/in/miguel-proa-68a66a30/

Brad Wicks joins the Duluth Office as an Intern. Brad is currently pursuing dual Master’s degrees in Architecture and Industrial Design from Iowa State University. Brad coordinates social events for graduate architecture students as a part of the Iowa State Graduate Students in Architecture organization. https://www.linkedin.com/in/bbwicks/

Neva Hubbert joins the Minneapolis Office as an Intern. Neva recently graduated from Washington State University (WSU) with her Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies. She earned multiple honors throughout her academic career at WSU including first place for her Architecture and Construction Management CAPSTONE project. Neva is fluent in German and speaks Spanish conversationally. She is pursuing her Master of Architecture degree at the University of Minnesota.

+  Minneapolis Office Parking, July 1, 2017

Minneapolis Office Parking

July 1, 2017

Construction Alert! Guest parking has moved to the south side of LHB’s Minneapolis Office at 701 Washington Avenue North. Please park in the Loose-Wiles Building Visitor Spaces and sign in with the security guard. This is in effect as of August 30, 2017, and will continue until updated due to construction of the neighboring new building. We appreciate your patience and apologize for any inconvenience.

+  How to Give Your Work Meaning, June 30, 2017

How to Give Your Work Meaning

June 30, 2017

Many hope for a job that is more than just a paycheck. When you spend most of your waking hours doing work, is there a way to make it more meaningful to help the time you spend there more rewarding? This is a challenge for employers as well. It’s costly for employers to find and train workers, so it is an advantage when a company can attract and retain its best talent. Happy employees are good for PR, since a negative perception may affect sales. Most importantly, engaged employees can improve a company, for the bottom line, and for their own quality of work life.

So how can employers and employees create a workplace that has meaning?

Relationships.

“It starts with your boss,” says Human Resources Director Mark R. Anderson of LHB, “If you don’t have a great relationship with your boss, you’re going to have a hard time being happy.” LHB, an engineering, architectural and planning firm in Minnesota, was voted a Star Tribune Top 150 Workplace in 2017 by its employees. High marks were given for the management. “Managers need to engage with their employees. We suggest they have regular meetings with employees, and not just at the employee’s annual review.”

But don’t let all the responsibility live with your boss. Sharlyn Lauby who writes the blog HR Bartender recently posted “An Employee’s Guide to Successful 1:1 Meetings with your Manager.” One of her top items is to establish a regular schedule with your manager for your meeting. That meeting is an opportunity to tell your boss what you have accomplished recently, what assistance you need to attain your goals, and to offer feedback to improve the company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use regular meetings with your supervisor to highlight what you’ve accomplished and what help you need to meet your goals.

 

 

Make time for learning.

Companies have long offered seminars, tuition assistance, and paid time for learning. Like LHB, some have a Learning Management System (LMS) that is an online education portal that can be accessed by all employees. A highly educated staff benefits both employer and employee, since employees are prepared for fluctuations in their careers or a company’s markets. The responsibility to learn though, rests with the employee. By determining your own development, you can take charge of your own career path. “There is no clear path for personal and professional development after high school and college,” noted Alanna Moravetz, Executive Coach. “As an adult, you have to make your own path. That involves assessment, reflection, and creating ways to measure your success.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Learning Management System (LMS) provides employees at all levels with a convenient online system to take classes, share internal knowledge, and track progress.

 

 

Working on Great Projects.

Tired of doing the same thing every day? Melany Gallant, a writer for TalentSpace Blog, suggested asking to work on cross-cultural or cross-discipline teams. Get involved with professional associations in your field or with community groups that can utilize your talents. Companies often support employee involvement sometimes financially or through paid time off. Try breaking the monotony by researching new technology or trends for your industry and presenting your findings. Dan Stine, an architect at LHB, became the company’s Virtual Design guru after researching how to convert the firm’s 3D designs into virtual reality (VR). “VR only started a year ago for us. Now LHB and I are being interviewed for case studies by computer hardware suppliers Dell and NVIDIA we’ve presented professionally to help others figure out the process, and we were featured in national publications” noted Stine. “I feel great knowing that my passion has helped our profession and staff. My research has also helped generate revenue for our company. I get to apply VR to projects that I may not otherwise have been involved with.”  Simply taking the initiative to work on other projects can help advance your career and give you new opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking the initiative to research trends in your industry and presenting your findings helps to keep your work day stimulating. Architect Dan Stine of LHB inspired the design firm’s early adoption of virtual and augmented reality.

 

Work is a place where you can grow and learn. In addition to earning a living, make it a place that broadens your knowledge and skills. In return, you become a more valued employee and can create more meaningful work days.

+  LHB Announces New Hires, May 9, 2017

LHB Announces New Hires

May 9, 2017

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (May 9, 2017) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

Molly Weismantel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Molly Weismantel, AIA, LEED AP BD+C joins the Minneapolis office as an Architect (California only) in the Government Group. Molly is a member of the American Institute of Architects, the Urban Land Institute, and the North Dakota State University Architecture Alumni Advisory Board. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from NDSU with a Master of Architecture. Molly has extensive experience in municipal projects for passenger transit, operations, and maintenance facilities.

Derek Petersen

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derek Petersen, AIA joins the Minneapolis office as a Minnesota licensed Architect in the Commercial Group. A member of the American Institute of Architects, Derek has detailed experience with architectural and interior design, conceptual drawings, and renderings. He is a graduate of the Masters of Architecture program at the University of Minnesota, where he is an adjunct professor at their School of Architecture leading an introductory architectural drawing course for undergraduate architecture majors.

Barbara Jutila

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Jutila joins the Duluth office as an Administrative Assistant to LHB’s Chief Executive Officer. Barb has over 20 years of office administration experience within architecture, engineering, real estate development, and construction industries.

Josh Jaskari

 

 

 

 

 

 

Josh Jaskari joins the Duluth office as an IT Support Technician. Josh has two years of network administration experience. He graduated from Lake Superior College with his Associate of Applied Science Degree in network administration. Josh is also a stand-up comedian and has been performing since 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brandon Clark joins the Duluth office as an Intern in LHB’s Public Works and Structures Department. Brandon is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He is an active member of the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Alex Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alex Wolf joins the Duluth office as an Intern in LHB’s Public Works and Structures Department. Alex is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He has previously interned with the City of Duluth and the City of River Falls, WI.

+  LHB Presenting at 2017 MASBO Annual Conf..., May 5, 2017

LHB Presenting at 2017 MASBO Annual Conference in Duluth

May 5, 2017

Minnesota and Wisconsin (May 5, 2017) – LHB will be presenting at Lincoln Park Middle School and at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center (DECC) for the Minnesota Association of School Business Officials’ (MASBO) Annual Conference May 10-12 in Duluth. This conference is the largest gathering of school business professionals offering a variety of professional development opportunities, certifications, trainings, and educational workshops.

As a part of the MASBO Annual Conference, a tour of Lincoln Park Middle School will be held on Wednesday, May 10th at 10:00 a.m. The tour will be led by School Principal, Brenda Vatthauer; Superintendent of Duluth Schools ISD 709, William Gronseth; Kerry Leider, former Property and Risk Manager at Duluth Schools; and LHB Architect, Kevin Holm. During the tour, attendees will hear about the project and view the educational spaces that look out to Lake Superior and the working harbor of the St. Louis River estuary.

LHB’s Phil Fisher will also be presenting as part of the conference at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center in Duluth, MN on Thursday, May 11th at 10:30 a.m. Phil’s presentation, “Facility Management Strategies: Finding the Hidden Dollars that Should Be Directly Helping Students, will outline the operational and energy savings, processes implemented, staff development efforts, and the long-term vision for continued improvement LHB used while working with public schools.

Kevin Holm is a registered architect in Minnesota and is one of LHB’s Integrative Design Team Leaders. He has over 20 years of experience in education planning and design, along with referendum planning. Learn more about Kevin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-holm-501b1246/

Phil Fisher has over 35 years in building construction and operations. Phil’s experience includes managing school building operations, overseeing custodial staff, and providing operational commissioning on new projects and existing facilities. Learn more about Phil on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/phil-fisher-cpe-24201389

The conference invites hundreds of people to the area for three days of information and networking, including educational sessions, speakers, trade show, a 5K wellness walk/run, and socializing. For more information on the conference visit: http://www.mnasbo.org/page/2017ConfCentral

+  Inspiring the next generation of nature ..., May 1, 2017

Inspiring the next generation of nature lovers

May 1, 2017

When you are surrounded by 7 million people and a whole lot of concrete, how do you inspire the next generation of conservationists?

You get them outside.

“In Metro Detroit, if you want a world-class outdoor recreational experience you’ll find it right in your own backyard at the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge,” said John Hartig, refuge manager.

Unfortunately, many folks don’t even know this natural jewel is just 20 miles south of Detroit.

The 6,200-acre refuge includes 20 scattered units of islands, coastal wetlands, marshes, shoals and waterfront lands along the Detroit River and western Lake Erie ranging from southwest Detroit to the Ohio border. The focus at the refuge is on conserving, protecting and restoring habitat for 300 species of birds and 117 species of fish.

The refuge is part of the Detroit Heritage River Water Trail, which meanders through the Detroit, Huron, Rouge and Raisin rivers and offers miles of paddling opportunities. Recently, Michigan residents, through a Michigan Department of Natural Resources survey, identified the Detroit Heritage River Water Trail as one of the Top 11 Water Trails in Michigan.

It was selected as the first phase of the water trail “based on mounting enthusiasm to explore these reaches, the wide diversity of paddling experiences found along the way, and the area’s abundant natural beauty and rich wildlife resources,” according to the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition.

It’s the only international wildlife refuge in North America and it’s an environmental success story. After decades of pollution, the Detroit River is a different place today than it was 50 years ago.

“Dramatic pollution prevention, environmental cleanup and conservation have made the area one of the most impressive environmental recoveries on the continent,” said Matt Pedigo, chair of the Michigan Wildlife Council.

The Michigan Wildlife Council was established three years ago to educate the public about the importance of wildlife conservation.

The council is currently in the midst of a campaign to increase public knowledge about the ways in which Michigan’s wildlife and natural resources are managed and funded, and the important role sportsmen and sportswomen play in preserving Michigan’s outdoor heritage for future generations.

The comeback of the “Conservation Crescent”

The Refuge Gateway, located adjacent to Humbug Marsh in Trenton, is Michigan’s only Wetland of International Importance designated under the international Ramsar Convention.  Together the Refuge Gateway and Humbug Marsh are centerpieces of the refuge. The Refuge Gateway will be home to a new visitor center, school ship dock, fishing pier and trails slated to open in fall 2017.

It’s also a prime example of Southeast Michigan’s environmental comeback.

This 44-acre industrial brownfield was the home of a Chrysler automotive plant until 1990. Today all of the land surrounding the visitor center has been cleaned up and is part of the “Conservation Crescent.” The Refuge Gateway is owned by Wayne County and cooperatively managed with the refuge.

“This is one of the most remarkable ecological recovery stories in North America,” Hartig said.

The Refuge Gateway has been in the works for years.

The John D. Dingell Jr. Visitor Center – named for the former Michigan congressman who championed numerous conservation causes and legislation in his decades-long career – will offer 12,000 square feet of outdoor learning and exploration.

“One-third of the visitor center will be devoted to hands-on and minds-on activities for children and families. There’ll be a wildlife observation room overlooking Humbug Marsh, which is the jewel of the refuge and just a stone’s throw away,” Hartig said.

Outside, visitors can stroll up and down a new 740-foot pier and drop a fishing line into water considered to be some of the best walleye fishing in the nation. There will also be a spot to dock the Michigan Sea Grant school ship that visits the refuge, as well as a canoe and kayak launch.

The Refuge Gateway will also offer three observation decks, scopes and hiking trails on the marsh and woods.

“We’ve also built a bald eagles’ nest on the ground that’s about 7 to 8 feet across. Kids will be able to get in the middle of this immense nest to get a feel for what a real one is really like and then look across the water to Humbug Island and actually see bald eagles in their native habitat,” Hartig said.

It’s experiences like this that will help inspire the next generation of conservationists, experts say.

Funding for the $7 million visitor center, $3.5 million dock and pier, and $1.5 million roads, trails and boardwalks comes from federal, state, county and local agencies and nonprofits, as well as many corporate and individual donations.

Connecting urban residents with nature

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  has designated the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge as one of the 14 priority urban wildlife refuges in the nation. About 80 percent of the U.S. population now lives in urban communities.

“So it’s vital that we connect with urban America and show them just how great nature really is. That’s how we’ll help foster the next generation of conservationists,” Hartig said.

“We believe we can do that by putting people in direct contact with nature like we will at our new visitor center.”

More than 100 volunteers have trained over the last year as refuge ambassadors so they can share all the wonders of the refuge with the thousands of people expected to visit annually.

Although the visitor center likely won’t open until this fall, there are still plenty of nature-friendly events coming up in Metro Detroit, said Joann Van Aken, International Wildlife Refuge Alliance executive director.

“And when the visitor center opens this fall, I hope people will take the time to get off I-75 and come over to see the jewel we’ve got here. They’ll be quite surprised,” Van Aken said.

The Michigan Wildlife Council

Link to Article

+  District Energy St. Paul and Saint Paul ..., April 28, 2017

District Energy St. Paul and Saint Paul Port Authority Win Sustainable Saint Paul Awards

April 28, 2017

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (April 28, 2017) – District Energy St. Paul’s energy efficient office renovation of the Jemne Building and the Saint Paul Port Authority’s Saints Business Center in St. Paul, MN received Sustainable Saint Paul Awards at the event’s 11th annual celebration on April 19, 2017. District Energy St. Paul’s Jemne Building won the Green Building Design for Existing Buildings and the Saint Paul Port Authority’s Saints Business Center won the Green Building Design for New Construction. Both projects were designed by LHB.

District Energy St. Paul – Jemne Building

One of District Energy’s primary objectives in renovating the Jemne Building was to showcase new technologies, best practices, and state-of-the-art equipment in a way that enables the company to continue to educate its employees, clients, and partners. District Energy was committed to doing as much to achieve energy efficiency in this building as they would ever ask of their best client.

To this end, District Energy elected to use the State of Minnesota’s Sustainable Building 2030 (SB 2030) program to set and meet an aggressive energy efficiency standard. This integrative process resulted in a building that showcases multiple energy efficiency strategies including district heating and cooling, new LED lighting with daylight or occupancy sensors, and an upgraded building automation system. The renovation also included electric vehicle charging stations, composting and recycling programs, water conservation, and material reuse. To learn more about the Jemne Building project: http://www.lhbcorp.com/project/jemne-office-building/#5

Saint Paul Port Authority (SPPA) – Saints Business Center

The Saints Business Center is the first speculative multi-tenant office warehouse project in the nation to receive LEED CS–Silver pre-certification. SPPA redeveloped the former Saint’s stadium urban brownfield site, and then worked with developer, United Properties, to create this 190,000 SF precast concrete panel office warehouse building.

The unique brownfield site remediation plan included removing soils in contaminated hot-spot areas and disposing these soils at a state-regulated off-site facility. The storm water treatment system is designed to eliminate runoff for the site’s 100-year, 24-hour storm event by infiltrating all the runoff and recharging the aquifer. To learn more about the Saints Business Center project: https://www.sppa.com/and-the-winner-is

The Sustainable Saint Paul Awards recognize community members and organizations for making a commitment to creating a more sustainable Saint Paul. By sponsoring these awards, the City of Saint Paul hopes to encourage all residents, businesses, community groups and non-profits in Saint Paul to implement similar projects. For more information on this year’s awards:   https://www.stpaul.gov/news/sustainable-saint-paul-awards

+  School District of Superior to Break Gro..., April 18, 2017

School District of Superior to Break Ground on Superior High School Addition and Renovation

April 18, 2017

Superior Exterior Rendering_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin; (April 18, 2017) – The School District of Superior, WI is set to break ground Wednesday, April 19, 2017 to mark the start of the addition to and renovation of Superior High School designed by LHB. The ceremony will begin at 10:00 a.m. at 2600 Catlin Avenue, Superior, WI 54880.

LHB is providing architecture and engineering services for the project, with construction management services from Kraus-Anderson Construction and local contractors. The project includes the addition of an academic wing, auxiliary gymnasium, administration offices, media center, cafeteria, commons area, and commercial kitchen. The fitness area, locker rooms, technology education space, and auditorium will receive renovations to improve functionality for students, staff, and guests. The new construction and renovations will provide upgraded safety and security for all facility users.

The School District of Superior’s mission is to provide all children with the relevant tools to develop a foundation for living, learning, and working successfully. The District’s nine school buildings accommodate 4,707 students ranging from early childhood through grade 12.

+  School District of Superior to Break Gro..., April 10, 2017

School District of Superior to Break Ground on New Cooper Elementary

April 10, 2017

SW_N2

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (April 10, 2017) – The School District of Superior, WI is set to break ground Wednesday, April 12, 2017 to mark the start of demolition of the existing Cooper Elementary and the construction of the new Cooper Elementary School designed by LHB. The ceremony will begin at 10:00 a.m. at 1807 Missouri Avenue, Superior, WI 54880.

The new Early Childhood to grade five facility is designed to accommodate 600 students, plus faculty and staff. The project will replace the existing facility on the same site. Main project goals include improved site safety and circulation, building security, clear entry for parents and visitors, increased occupant capacity, and an improved educational environment. The new facility includes Early Childhood functions within the building and a separate age-appropriate playground, as well as designs specifically focus on the district’s autism program, in addition to the standard K-5 grades and support spaces.

LHB is providing architecture and engineering services for the project, with construction services from Kraus-Anderson Construction and local contractors.

The School District of Superior’s mission is to provide all children with the relevant tools to develop a foundation for living, learning, and working successfully. The District’s nine school buildings accommodate 4,707 students ranging from early childhood through grade 12.

+  5 Steps to Make VR a Reality in Your Pra..., March 28, 2017

5 Steps to Make VR a Reality in Your Practice

March 28, 2017

Courtesy CannonDesign

If you’ve attended any industry event recently, you’ve likely seen demonstrations of virtual reality (VR) technology. VR is being touted as the next big thing across multiple industries, from entertainment to medicine to construction. The frenzied interest in VR is bolstered by the technology’s rapid evolution and increased availability.

Whereas VR once required expensive hardware, VR headsets are easily accessible to consumers now, from the $600 HTC Vive headset to the $15 Google Cardboard, which uses a smartphone for its display screen. Though fully interactive VR environments require custom programming using a game-design engine like Unity, simpler, but still impressive VR experiences can be created directly from Autodesk Revit and Trimble SketchUp models using software such as Enscape, IrisVR, or Yulio.

In addition to VR, which typically represents fully immersive environments, technology companies are busy creating augmented- and mixed-reality applications. Augmented reality (AR) environments overlay computer-generated information, such as utility lines, on top of real-world views, like a photograph of a city street. Mixed reality (MR), on the other hand, combines real and digital objects in a hybrid environment, such as this MR solar calculation tool developed by Los Angeles–based CO Architects.

But beyond the general marketing hype, what is VR’s real potential in architecture, and how can firms implement VR into their practices in a more meaningful way than as just another cool way to present 3D renderings?

Below are five steps to introduce VR, AR, and MR technology into your firm’s workflow:

1. Know Your Why
Jimmy Rotella, a senior associate and digital practice director in CannonDesign’s Chicago office, recommends first outlining your firm’s goals for VR. Is it going to be a design tool or a marketing tool? Will you use it for virtual mock-ups? Do you need high-quality models? How interactive do they need to be? After you identify your intent, you can then develop potential use cases. The required technology and level of investment will be different for each goal, Rotella says.

CO Architects discovered that VR helps fill in unknowns during the design process. Exploring a concept model in a fully immersive environment allows architects and clients to understand it better. Likewise, VR lets designers test different options at full-scale early in the process. VR also has visceral appeal. “Not everyone can read drawings,” says CO principal Eyal Perchik, AIA, “but everyone can relate to VR.” In the firm’s VR mock-ups of complex lab and healthcare spaces, doctors and nurses could virtually work in a space, testing its layout and scale long before it’s constructed. Currently, all projects at CO employ VR in some capacity.

Hickok Cole Architects in Washington, D.C., began exploring VR through its in-house iLab program, which provides micro-grants for employees to research new ideas and technologies. Recipients Carlyn Luu, a project architect, and Howard Mack, a design technology specialist, explored potential applications of VR tools in design, presentation, and marketing. In design, Luu and Mack used VR to highlight unresolved issues at the forthcoming International Spy Museum, for which Hickok Cole is the architect of record. By sharing the VR model with the client, they realized that they could not curate carefully styled views of the project as they could with conventional 3D renderings—the client could explore the model however they saw fit. Hickok Cole is currently using VR on three projects with plans to roll it out on more projects soon.

2. Ask For Help
Rotella recommends partnering with software companies, which may fall outside a design firm’s typical network. CannonDesign worked with software company Enscape as a beta tester, getting early access to Enscape’s Revit plug-in and providing feedback on new software features. Rotella also recommends that firms educate a wide group of people—designers, business development and marketing staff—in VR to help client-facing leaders understand the hardware and software limitations before agreeing to provide VR deliverables.

CO Architects’ interest in the technology began when a job candidate with extensive VR and gaming experience applied for a position with the firm. “Having an in-house VR expert opened our eyes to the technology’s potential,” says CO principal Jenna Knudsen, AIA.

3. Make the Necessary Investment
CannonDesign’s experimentation with VR began through its digital practice group. As clients began asking VR building models, the firm increased its investment in the technology and began using VR in applications beyond client presentations. Designers saw the value of exploring their own creations in VR while clients saw value in using VR to train their staff how to use their forthcoming facility before occupancy.

To foster interest in VR among staff, Boston-based Payette created a lounge space with dedicated hardware and software in its office. The firm also posts VR-related information to its intranet.

David Hamel, a 3D visualization designer, is exploring the use of virtual mockups for laboratory and healthcare projects using Unity, a game design engine that can export VR experiences to the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift headsets. He encourages practices interested in getting started with VR to “jump in and put a headset on.” He predicts AR, with its potential to overlay BIM data on construction sites, will become even more important in the AEC industry.

LHB, an architecture and engineering firm with offices in Minnesota and Wisconsin, began experimenting with VR technology through Google Cardboard viewers and off-the-shelf software about a year ago. It has since increased its investment, fitting out an office with a dedicated VR lounge that includes a HTC Vive headset and 65-inch 4k monitor. BIM administrator Dan Stine says LHB tries to stay on “the cutting edge, but not the bleeding edge” of technology.

4. Garner User Buy-In
One concern CO Architects has heard from clients is whether the sensation of moving in a virtual space will induce motion sickness. User comfort is a big priority, Knudsen says. She encourages users to go slow and checks in on them frequently.

CO has also discovered that the VR experiences need to be focused and short in duration: Five to 10 minutes is best. “You don’t want clients getting lost in your virtual building,” says BIM director Nuri Miller. Current VR technology is a solitary experience as off-the-shelf solutions for multiuser VR experiences are still lacking. Principal Fabian Kremkus, AIA, envisions the day when architects will virtually lead tours of their proposed design to clients.

One open question that remains is how to bill clients for VR. CannonDesign currently does not charge clients for VR services such as walkthroughs or virtual tours, seeing them as an extension of the design process. That said, the firm sees interactive VR mockups as an additional service and plans to bill clients separately for this type of work.

5. Take Advantage of the New Vantage

Payette’s Hamel recounts the first time a colleague donned an HTC Vive headset to view a bridge element of his project. Before Hamel could ask the designer if he was comfortable, the designer walked virtually over to the bridge’s handrail and started revising the design. VR, and the new perspective it offers, is a game changer for architects, Hamel believes.

Hickok Cole’s Luu discovered that clients often notice details in the VR models that the design team didn’t consider important. As a result, VR becomes a discovery tool to better understand the client’s priorities and their intended, actual use of a space. If a client spent more time exploring a particular back-of-house area in VR, for example, the team knew they would do the same in the actual building.

For the reconstruction of a street in Duluth, Minn., LHB communicated the extent of underground utility work in VR (shown above), as well as through conventional 2D drawings, which helped the client understand the project scope. LHB made the same model available to the public through its website, where it can be viewed onscreen or through a Google Cardboard headset.

Conclusion
Virtual reality has the potential to transform how architects design buildings and how clients experience and review the proposed concepts. As more architecture firms adopt BIM, incorporating VR into the design process becomes a natural extension given BIM’s 3D-based workflow. The challenge will be for firms to train their staff on the technology and to use VR to its full potential.

Luu advises all architects to test out VR and see what works: “Don’t be afraid to explore the possibilities.”

 

Michael Kilkelly
March 27, 2017
Link to ARCHITECT Magazine Article

+  Does your work desk use as much energy a..., March 24, 2017

Does your work desk use as much energy as a refrigerator?

March 24, 2017

plugload

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plugs fill a power strip in this photo illustration. Richard Drew | AP

 

Dual monitors.

Cellphone chargers.

Coffee makers.

Space heaters.

If you have one or more of them plugged in at your workspace, you’re part of a growing problem in building efficiency.

LED lighting and changes to heating and cooling systems have cut down on energy use in commercial buildings since 2003. But now, plugload — the energy it takes to power all those things plugged into your desktop power strip — is rising.

It’s largely a function of modernity. The tools we use to do our jobs today require a lot more power cords than they used to.

“It used to be you would have an electric pencil sharpener and a light at your desk,” said Thea Rozenbergs, an architectural designer at LHB Architects in Minneapolis. She led a study with colleagues from the Center for Energy and Environment and Seventhwave.

We’re way beyond electric pencil sharpeners now.

In fact, a typical office workstation uses as much electricity as a full-size refrigerator — and a third of that energy is wasted because things are left on during meetings, lunch breaks and at night.

So what can you do about it in your office?

Gather data

What are the biggest energy hogs in your office?

Do a walk-through, perhaps at night when no one is around, to see what’s plugged in or left on at people’s desks.

A relatively inexpensive meter can show how much electricity a device is using at any given time. You can find one at a hardware store or online. Your company’s IT department also likely has data to show how heavily computers contribute to power usage.

Also identify how many shared devices — printers, coffee makers, water coolers — exist around your office, and how much they contribute to total plugload.

Manage your computer power

IT departments can work with staff to figure out when it makes sense for computers and printers to go into low-power mode or be shut down altogether.

Departments can also look at power usage when ordering new equipment, especially computers, servers, printers and coffee makers.

One interesting thing the study found is that, while laptops are more efficient than desktop computers, adding a second monitor to a workstation negates that energy savings.

As for shutting computers down completely, computers tolerate it better than they used to, and it saves the most energy. But check with your IT department first, because there are a range of opinions. Energy Star has compiled a useful list of myths about computer power modes.

Use smart power strips paired with occupancy sensors or switch buttons

A smart power strip turns off a device that goes into standby mode, eliminating what’s known as “phantom power.”

In your home, you could save energy by plugging your TV, stereo or coffee maker into a smart power strip.

In the office plugload study, researchers tried using advanced power strips connected to either an occupancy sensor or a button that an employee could turn on when they arrive to work and off when they go home. The power strip allowed computers to continuously get power while shutting off other things — monitors, lamps, phone chargers — whenever the employee was away.

The payback on the power strips, sensors and buttons was relatively quick.

Put common-area devices on timers

Is your office water cooler plugged in 24/7/365?

Unless you have people in the office working at all hours and using it, you’re wasting energy.

The same could be said about printers, TVs, mini-fridges or anything else that slurps up electricity at night and on weekends for no good reason.

To tackle the problem, you could install a simple timer that goes on and off at the same time every day, or invest in a more sophisticated timer that allows you to program different weekend and weekday settings — similar to a programmable thermostat.

Educate, then reward good energy behavior

Rather than confronting that one employee with the space heater, lava lamp, hot plate and espresso machine at his desk, communicate best practices for energy use office-wide, then start rewarding those who follow it.

During the study, researchers launched an information campaign, and followed up by leaving chocolate or gift cards at the desks of good energy stewards and a little blue reminder light for those who needed a nudge.

The study found that a behavior campaign can prompt significant energy savings.

Elizabeth Dunbar

St. Paul, MN

March 24, 2017

Link to story on MPR

+  How VR Is Helping Revitalize Downtown Du..., March 22, 2017

How VR Is Helping Revitalize Downtown Duluth

March 22, 2017

Superior Street is one of Duluth, Minnesota’s oldest and most iconic streets, home to family businesses, shops and cafes.

downtown duluth minnesota today
Superior Street today in downtown Duluth, Minnesota.

Now virtual reality is helping with a long awaited revitalization project thanks to the work of LHB, a local architecture, engineering and planning firm.

Everyone from Minnesota’s lieutenant governor to the general public is interested in Superior Street’s redevelopment. Key to gaining support for the project was how LHB used VR to provide an immersive, realistic rendering that displayed the aesthetics, lighting, ambience and sightlines.

For many, it’s difficult to visualize how the final project will appear in real life when viewing 2D drawings of the design. The ability to experience the scene in a real scale from every viewpoint using VR made for far better informed decision making.

downtown duluth minnesota in vr
Superior Street revitalized as rendered in VR.

VR also helped streamline the design review process and control costs because potential design issues were spotted before construction started.

For LHB, delivering a high-quality VR experience began by generating designs in high-end design and modeling applications. They used topography information from AutoCAD Civil 3D and modeled details such as curbs and utilities with Autodesk Revit.

To create realistic nighttime views, streetlamps and other light sources were photometrically accurate for the lamp and bulb type — all with the help of NVIDIA Quadro GPUs. The data was rendered in real time using VR applications such as Revizto, and then all came together in Fuzor, a turnkey VR platform for the AEC industry.

The Tech Behind the Turnaround

Running Fuzor with NVIDIA Quadro GPUs offers unique benefits, such as access to NVIDIA VRWorks enabled VR SLI. With VR SLI, dual Quadro GPUs can render one eye each — dramatically accelerating performance and resulting in a smoother VR experience.

It all adds up to LHB creating a more compelling experience much earlier than with traditional design tools.

“Traditional fixed-angle renderings still have their place, but having VR allows our clients to freely explore projects in progress. This forces us to consider materials and other design elements earlier in the process so the VR experience is realistic. This also allows the client to make more informed decisions earlier,” says Dan Stine, BIM administrator for LHB.

“The payoff is client buy-in and spotting potential issues before starting construction, and that’s invaluable,” Stine says.

Read the full case study here: http://images.nvidia.com/content/virtual-reality/pdf/Quadro-LHB-Customer-Story.pdf

Link to Blog Article

+  Virtual and Augmented Reality Helping Cl..., March 14, 2017

Virtual and Augmented Reality Helping Clients Envision LHB Designs

March 14, 2017

Virtual_and_Augmented_Reality_Helping_Clients_Envision_LHB_Designs-syndImport-074702[1]

Dan Stine sees things quite differently at work. That’s because he’s in charge of guiding LHB’s use of virtual and augmented realities into the design process.

LHB is a leading engineering, design and architecture firm. And they are leading the way in the region in the design process, by using virtual reality.

Virtual reality is a computer generated version of facilities they’ve been hired to design. Facilities like the new Superior High School.

The program and headset give clients a real sense of how low the ceilings will be, for example. Stine showed us inside the media room, the school store, and even sat behind a desk using the headset.

It’s a hands-on advantage for those who are not familiar with architecture terms.

“The client may be spending millions of dollars for the first time. It really helps them get a higher level of confidence in what we’re doing for them,” Stine explained.

And details matter, no matter the size of the project.

Bill Bennett, CEO of LHB, told us, “I think it’s much more effective allowing our clients to experience what they are really going to feel.”

They are constantly looking to the future as well. In fact, the next step is augmented reality. Stine put on a different, wireless headset to demonstrate it.

It shows you similar things to virtual reality. But it layers on existing reality, making it more interactive, and it uses holographs.

“It’s almost like the holograms in the movies. You don’t envision it will ever come and then it’s coming. It’s a much more real-time feel. You can walk through a building,” he explained.

VR (Virtual Reality) and AR (Augmented Reality) are a long ways from the drafting tables of years past. But the industry has moved into this. And LHB is moving right with it.

The company has taken the technology to Duluth and Superior Days, to their respective state capitals, to show people potential projects.

Link to WDIO Article

+  Cool Offices: LHB pushes for excellence ..., March 7, 2017

Cool Offices: LHB pushes for excellence in energy-efficient office

March 7, 2017

Architecture and engineering firm LHB Inc. designs projects with sustainability in mind, but for its Minneapolis office it went for the highest level of LEED certification: Platinum.

The office uses LED lights to reduce energy consumption. Its design incorporates sustainable materials like recycled steel, glass and certified wood. It has control systems that automatically dim perimeter lights when enough daylight enters the building. It also meters its electric bill, which pays independently, unlike in most multitenant office buildings where the bill is divided into a percentage of square footage leased.

Nick Vreeland, an architect at LHB, oversaw the firm’s LEED certification process, while Maureen Colburn, another architect at the firm, continues to explore how the office can become more energy efficient and sustainable. (LHB is participating in a study on plug load reduction conducted by the Center for Energy and Environment and funded by the Minnesota Department of Commerce.)

Minneapolis Office Leader Mike Fischer said the office’s focal point is the “town hall,” a gathering area that accommodates more than 50 people. The space is used for all-staff meetings and events, while also serving as a lunchroom.

The town hall has a projector and virtual reality technology. The virtual environment allows clients and employees to “walk through” their designs.

The “main street” is a unifying element in the office. The walkway guides employees to a variety of workstations. Fischer said the office is moving toward “free address,” where employees will arrive and grab any desk or space they feel comfortable working at for the day.

Conference rooms and smaller meeting areas, called pods, have videoconferencing technology. The pods are crafted so the wall of space curves to become a seating area.

“There’s a strategic placement of conference rooms,” Fischer said. “Architecturally, [we’ve spun] them, twisting them a little off the grid so they look a little more playful – as though they were dropped in.”

Link to Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal Article

Emily Sweeney

Mar 7, 2017, 5:00am CST

+  Vogel Named Surveyor of the Year, March 6, 2017

Vogel Named Surveyor of the Year

March 6, 2017

Paul Vogel Color_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin; (March 6, 2017) – Paul Vogel, PLS has been named the 2016 Surveyor of Year by the Minnesota Society of Professional Surveyors (MSPS). This award is presented for dedicated service to the Land Surveying Profession and MSPS.

Paul has been with LHB for nine years, and has 28 years of surveying experience. A licensed land surveyor in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Alaska, Paul is the chair of the Public Relations/Information committee and a former President of MSPS. Paul is also a member of the National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS) and the Wisconsin Society of Land Surveyors (WSLS), and serves on the Technical Advisory Board of Lake Superior College. He was appointed by Governor Mark Dayton to his current seat on the Minnesota Board of Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture, Geoscience, and Interior Design (AELSLAGID) as a Land Surveyor Board Member.

“Paul has taken a great pride in raising awareness for the profession of surveying and educating those who may be considering a career in the field of surveying. He has committed an extraordinary amount of time to the society by serving on the Board of Directors, the Public Relations/Information Committee, and as a past President of the society,” said MSPS Past President, Connie Villari, PLS

The objective of the MSPS is to unite all licensed Land Surveyors in the State of Minnesota; to elevate the standards of the surveying profession in the State of Minnesota; to establish basic minimum guidelines for surveys; to assist in promoting legislation, educational programs and public relations to improve the profession of the land surveyor; to work in cooperation with local, county, and state governments in the field of surveying; to uphold a rigid code of ethics and strive to improve relationships with clients and the protection of the public by performing with precision and integrity. For more information on MSPS: http://www.mnsurveyor.com/

+  LHB to Present at 2017 MASBO Institute, March 2, 2017

LHB to Present at 2017 MASBO Institute

March 2, 2017

Troy Miller_0304S_161012_N18_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin (March 2, 2017) – LHB’s Troy Miller, AIA, REFP, and Becky Alexander, AIA, WELL AP will present at the 2017 Minnesota Association of School Business Officials (MASBO) Institute at the University of Minnesota Continuing Education and Conference Center in St. Paul, MN on Wednesday, March 8th at 10:40 a.m.

The presentation will provide school business management attendees with insight into the planning of school facilities, specifically in regard to the master planning process and the considerations that need to be made before the actual building design. The session highlights items to consider before design can begin, such as ever-changing technology needs and learning methods, occupant comfort, safety and security challenges, and energy costs.

MASBO Institute is a four-day, intensive introduction to all areas of school business management. It is a comprehensive introduction for those new to the profession, and an effective way for those already in the profession to gain a wider overview and perspective of school business functions. For more information on the conference visit: http://mnasbo.site-ym.com/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=899876

Troy has programmed, planned, and designed education projects for over 20 years and joined LHB as Group Leader in 2014. His experiences and expertise have allowed him the opportunity to work on over 100 schools from coast to coast. Becky is a researcher and architect at LHB. She provides a combination of sustainable building research and architectural design services that involves collecting, analyzing, visualizing, and synthesizing data for building, organization, and city-wide scales. Learn more about Troy and Becky on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/troy-w-miller-aia-14206219/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/becky-alexander-454447103/

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognition, February 13, 2017

LHB Announces Professional Recognition

February 13, 2017

S_161012_N18_medium

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (February 13, 2017) – Becky Alexander, AIA has earned the WELL Accredited Professional (WELL AP™) credential through the International WELL Building Institute™ (IWBI™), placing her among a group of leading professionals who are dedicated to supporting human health and well-being in the built environment.

“Attaining the WELL credential exemplifies Becky’s dedication to sustainable design and to improving wellness for our clients and the occupants in their facilities. Her commitment to improving the built environment is exactly what LHB values and what our clients expect,” noted LHB’s Integrative Design Team Leader, Rick Carter, FAIA, LEED Fellow.

The WELL AP credential is the new, leading credential signifying advanced knowledge of health and well-being in the built environment and specialization in the WELL Building Standard (WELL). The WELL Building Standard is the first building standard to focus exclusively on the health and wellness of the people in buildings. WELL is an evidence and performance-based system for measuring, certifying and monitoring features that impact human health and well-being in the built environment, through air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. United Properties and LHB have recently registered the very first WELL building in Minnesota, the Nordic House, an office building and residential project in the North Loop of Minneapolis.

Becky is an architect and researcher at LHB where she provides a combination of architectural design and performance services. Becky plays a key role in several significant state-wide initiatives to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Minnesota, including the Regional Indicators Initiative and Minnesota’s B3 and SB 2030 programs. Becky’s design and research is supported by a Bachelor of Arts from Carleton College and a Master of Architecture and Master of Science in Architecture – Sustainable Design from the University of Minnesota.

+  LHB to Present at 2017 Wisconsin State E..., January 16, 2017

LHB to Present at 2017 Wisconsin State Education Conference

January 16, 2017

Troy Miller_0304TDF_Tom_D_Fennessey_Professional

Minnesota and Wisconsin (January 16, 2017) – LHB Education Focus Leader Troy Miller, AIA, REFP and Owner’s Representative Tom Fennessey, will present at the 2017 Wisconsin State Education Convention hosted by the Wisconsin Association of School Boards (WASB) at the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, WI on Thursday, January 19th at 8:45 a.m.

The presentation, “B3 and Beyond: Three Steps to Save Dollars,” will walk attendees through a three-step process from utility analysis and benchmarking, to a closer look at operations and physical building assessments. LHB uses this process to help save districts money by working with utility representatives, facility experts, and internal staff. For more information:

http://www.wasb.org/programs/2017_sessions/index.php?p=Home#January 19, 2017

The Wisconsin Association of School Boards is dedicated to serving as an advocate for education and students. A non-profit organization, WASB seeks to advance education through supporting the tradition of local school board control of the state’s public schools. WASB is a member-driven organization that supports, promotes and advances the interests of public education in Wisconsin. For more convention information: http://www.wasb.org/websites/convention/index.php?p=834

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognition, January 6, 2017

LHB Announces Professional Recognition

January 6, 2017

Maia Harold_mediumJohn ImholteDavid Booth

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (January 6, 2017) – Maia Harold is now licensed in Minnesota as a Professional Engineer (Civil). Maia joined LHB in 2012 with her Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Maia provides LHB’s Public Works Group with analysis, design, and plan production for site design projects. Her analysis skills include AutoCAD Civil 3D site modeling and hydrologic design.

John Imholte is now licensed in Minnesota as a Professional Engineer (Mechanical). John joined LHB in 2012 with his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from North Dakota State University. John works with LHB’s Pipeline Group and his responsibilities include designing routes, verifying project drawings, reviewing projects, specifying materials, and assisting in project management for clients.

David Booth is now licensed in Minnesota as an Architect. David joined LHB in 2013 with his Master of Architecture degree from North Dakota State University. As part of LHB’s Integrative Design Team, David works with government, education, industrial, and commercial clients to design high performance and sustainable projects.

+  Sustainable: Reducing the energy waste o..., January 3, 2017

Sustainable: Reducing the energy waste of ‘plug load’

January 3, 2017

Walk around any office and it’s hard not to notice how many devices are plugged into electric outlets. Desktops routinely have two monitors, a computer and phone along with smartphones and iPads.

Welcome to the world of what researchers and energy experts call “plug load.” It’s become one of the fastest growing areas of energy consumption in offices as the number of devices grows, said Rick Carter, vice president of LHB Inc., an architecture and engineering company in Minneapolis.

In the 1970s plug load was 1 or 2 percent of an office’s energy load; today the figure has jumped to 20 to 25 percent. “The biggest part of the problem is no one is aware of it,” Carter said. “It’s just this thing out there that people feel they can’t control.”

LHB recently completed an extensive and nation-leading study of plug load along with Madison, Wisconsin-based Seventhwave and the Center for Energy and Environment (CEE) in Minneapolis. Funded by the Minnesota Department of Commerce, the study offered strategies for reducing plug-load consumption, along with case studies on how those were implemented in eight office in Minnesota.

Plug load has grown in part because energy experts haven’t spent a great deal of time studying the problem and looking for ways to mitigate it, according to Scott Hackel, principal energy engineer with Seventhwave. The focus has been on improving heating, cooling and lighting, he said, while plug load remained “in the realm of users, not building operators.”

Both Carter and Hackel highlighted state and industry efforts to move buildings to become net zero — producing as much energy as they consume — in the future. Progress has been made, but plug load remains a major barrier. “That piece of the pie hasn’t shrunken yet,” Carter said. “If we want to continue to drive building energy use down, we have to tackle this plug-load issue.”

 3 approaches, 8 buildings

Christopher Plum, operations and contracts manager with CEE, said the study took 40 sets of equipment to eight offices. First, meters were installed under employees’ desks to capture their energy consumption for one month. Then energy-saving equipment was installed for a month, offering researchers a chance to see improvements, he said.

The technology provided to reduce energy use was not particularly sophisticated. Employees received advanced power strips that allow users to split plugs into two sections. One section is for equipment employees want to keep on all the time. The other is for devices that can be shut off when employees are not at their workstations. A user could flick a switch on the strip to turn everything off.

Workstations were either equipped with a foot pedal — which also can be controlled by hand — or an occupancy sensor. The pedal put employees in control, while the senor simply shut down non-critical technology if a person left a workstation. Both were plugged into the smart power strip.

Occupancy sensors worked slightly better, reducing plug-load energy by 21.7 percent compared with 19 percent for the pedals.

The most effective way of decreasing plug load consumption was the third approach, computer power management.

Desktop computers consume as much as 66 percent of workstation energy, while laptops use half that much. Employing energy-management tools with desktops and laptops shuts them down or puts them in low-power modes when they are not being used.  Plug load drops by an average of more than 29 percent when computer power-management comes into play, the study showed.

What impressed Plum is that all three approaches worked and that the difference in energy savings between them wasn’t huge. “We had three types of energy control and they all worked,” he said. “They saved from a quarter to a third of the amount of electricity going through outlets in an office. Doing anything is better than trying to do the best thing. … We couldn’t definitely say you should do one thing and not the other.”

Giving employees the power of choosing which technology they want — the pedal or the occupancy sensor — may contribute to a successful program, Plum said. The technology was installed in CEE’s own office, and people requested more foot pedals than were available. Having employees select what they want to use means the technology is more likely to be accepted, he said.

Employees who ended up with occupancy sensors, Plum noted, reported no major headaches using them. However, computer power management didn’t quite achieve the same hassle-free experience for the handful of companies in the pilot that employed it, he noted.

One of the companies that struggled a bit with computer management was Bloomington-based Donaldson Co. Bill Coldwell, facility development and asset manager, said employees overwhelmingly supported sensor and foot pedal solution, with 80 percent saying they were “painless” to use. But in post-pilot evaluation surveys, 70 percent saw computer management as “too aggressive” an approach, Coldwell said.

Still, it was effective for Donaldson. After the company’s information technology department worked with Seventhwave on computer management, it saw a 41 percent drop in plug load energy use. Coldwell believes the company could deploy computer power management to all employees while allowing those who find it challenging to opt out.

Another issue with computer management is the challenge of remote users getting into their work computers. If their work computers are not on when they are trying to access them from home, it can cause headaches. While a workaround was devised for companies in the pilot they may choose not to embrace the computer-management in the future, despite its advantages.

Carter sees the computer power-management issue as one of perception. “There is IT staff that think it hurts the computer to turn it off and on, which it doesn’t. There are people who think their computer needs to be on at night, for one reason or another … and it doesn’t.”

Hackel agrees computer management turned out to require “more effort than I thought we’d need” to not cause issues for users.

The key to a program to reduce plug load, he noted, was good communication with employees and IT staffers, who will buy into changes if they understand the goals.

To grease the wheels of energy reduction, the pilot project helped change behavior with posters, emails and the reward of coffee cards and candy. The communications strategy largely worked, said Wes Nelson, operations coordinator for Ackerberg Group in Minneapolis. He expected some staff members would find the technology and the power-management change “annoying and challenging but we found there were no issues.”

The company plans to install the technology next year and to encourage tenants in its buildings to reduce plug load. This is precisely what Carter and others want to see — companies sharing their success in the program and encouraging others to do the same.

“All we’re saying is turn stuff off when you’re not using it,” he said. “These are fancier ways to do that. There’s always the option of leaning over and turning things off.”

Link to online article by Frank Jossi, Finance & Commerce | January 3, 2017

+  Building Blocks: District Energy/Ever-Gr..., December 23, 2016

Building Blocks: District Energy/Ever-Green Energy Headquarters

December 23, 2016

Jemne15x_Bill_Klotz_Photographer_cropped

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Jemne Building is located in downtown St. Paul at the corner of Kellogg Boulevard and St. Peter Street. (Finance and Commerce photo: Bill Klotz)


Address: 305 St. Peter St., St. Paul, MN

Website: www.districtenergy.com

Renovation cost:  $1.2 million

Architect: LHB Inc.

Contractor: RJM Construction

Property description: After leasing an office in St. Paul’s Landmark Tower for nine years, District Energy and its growing subsidy, Ever-Green Energy, had no room left for expansion.

Jemne Building owner Wold Architects and Engineers had the same problem — employees were crowded into all available space.

Wold found a new home and sold the historic Jemne to District Energy for $1.7 million in 2015. The company brought in Minneapolis-based LHB Inc. to renovate the 25,500-square-foot, four-floor property.

The Jemne is on the National Register of Historic Places. While District Energy wanted to maintain the graceful art deco interior it also wanted to update the property. “We’re about innovation and we wanted to create space that blended the building’s historic and artistic components with our history of sustainability,” said Nina Axelson, District Energy’s public relations vice president.

LHB added LED lighting and created interior executive offices with floor-to-ceiling windows to capture natural light, updated the heating and cooling system and added a green wall. The building’s alley now boasts electric car charging stations.

Rooms took on a new look, too. A former theater with gold leaf walls became a 2,025-square-foot conference space called the “Energy Learning Center.” A board room with a bank of floor-to-ceiling windows sits on a former stage above the learning center, with a mural of the city’s downtown decorating the back wall.

Another highlight, the lobby, showcases historic photos and inlaid floor decorations. The company’s executive leadership and office staff are in the Jemne, she said.

Intriguing tidbits: Designed by Elsa and Magnus Jemne for the Women’s City Club, the building opened in 1931. In 1972 the club headed for the suburbs and the building was sold to the precursor of the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

It’s one of downtown’s most unusual buildings, tucked into an odd-shaped lot surrounded by CenturyLink’s offices. A curving staircase connects the floors, several of which have charming fireplaces that no longer function. The limestone façade, semi-circular windows and Art Deco-Streamline Moderne style looks like nothing else.

“We love the building,” Axelson said.

Link to online Finance & Commerce article

+  LHB Announces Recognitions and New Hires, December 15, 2016

LHB Announces Recognitions and New Hires

December 15, 2016

NLV_Nick_L_Vreeland_0296_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin; (December 15, 2016) – Nick Vreeland, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, BECxP, CxA+BE, Senior Architect, passed the Building Enclosure Commissioning Examination at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Engineering Professional Development and is certified as both a Building Enclosure Commissioning Process Provider (BECxP) and a Commissioning Authority with a Building Enclosure focus (CxA+BE). The four-day course and examination focuses on how to recognize and avoid building enclosure problems, as well as how to successfully implement the commissioning process for building enclosures to verify enclosure quality and performance. For more information, https://epd.wisc.edu/course/commissioning-building-enclosure-assemblies-and-systems/

 

 

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Elizabeth C. Mauban, CDT, LEED AP BD+C, Electrical Designer, has become a U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional in Building Design and Construction (LEED AP BD+C). She is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

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Benjamin Kobold, Mechanical Designer, passed the Minnesota Board of Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture, Geoscience and Interior Design’s Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. Ben graduated in 2015 from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree.

 

 

 

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Erica Christenson, PLA has been chosen to participate in the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce’s 2016-2017 Twin Cities Leadership Program. Leadership Twin Cities is a nine-month series that informs people about the critical issues facing the community. Its focus is to inform and inspire future leaders – and challenge them to make a difference through personal commitment and involvement. Erica, a Senior Landscape Architect at LHB, is an award winning designer that joined LHB in June 2015.

 

 

 

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Robert Downs III has been chosen to participate in the 2016-2017 Superior/Douglas County Leadership Program hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Superior. The program aims to identify and cultivate existing and emerging community leaders who want to be involved in improving the community and shaping its future. Participants represent a cross-section of the urban and rural communities of Douglas County. Rob is a Business Analyst who joined LHB in January of 2015.

 

 

 

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Andrew Madson, AIA, LEED AP has been chosen to participate in the 2017 American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) Leadership FORUM hosted by the American Institute of Architects Minnesota. The program was created to foster and develop leadership for AIA Minnesota member architects at the mid-point of their careers. The mission of the forum is to assist AIA members in understanding and strengthening their role in leadership in areas of community involvement, government, professional practice, business development, and mentorship. Andrew is a licensed Architect who joined LHB in February of 2002. http://www.aia-mn.org/events/leadership-forum/

 

 

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth, MN office:

L.Shelby.

 

 

Lacy Shelby joins LHB as a Landscape Designer. Lacy graduated from Cornell University with her Master’s Degree in Landscape Architecture. Lacy is a published author and was awarded the 2016 Innovative Transportation Solutions Award from the Minnesota Chapter of the Women’s Transportation Seminar (WTS). http://www.wtsinternational.org/minnesota//awards/

 

 

 

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Lexi Weihe joins LHB as a Scanning Technician. Lexi is currently pursuing Bachelor’s Degrees in Urban and Regional Studies and Geographic Information Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

+  Industry Outlook for Water Conservation, December 7, 2016

Industry Outlook for Water Conservation

December 7, 2016

Experts discuss government policies that help or hinder water conservation in the built environment, the role of water availability and consumption data in raising awareness and shaping behavior, strategies that developers should employ to reduce the waste of water, and other factors influencing water use.

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What are good strategies that state and/or municipal governments can implement to encourage water conservation?

Fred Merrill: Some local governments have differential pricing. The water authority knows how much you should use in your house, without being too wasteful, and they’ll give you a good deal on that amount of water, but as you start to use more than that, the price per gallon goes way up. People really pay attention to their monthly water bill. In hot weather, during the day, when you shouldn’t be watering your lawn, the water authority might charge businesses and residents a higher rate for water use to encourage people to water the lawn in the evenings and at night, when the water has a chance to soak in. If you’re in a water-restricted area—say, the Southwest—you might not even be allowed to water your lawn. In some cases, water companies will actually pay homeowners and businesses to rip up lawns and replace them with xeriscapes, which require minimal water. Also, in a lot of cities and towns, the municipal pipes that move water through the system are so leaky that sometimes 20 to 30 percent of [it] never makes it out to the consumers. So cities are doing a lot of work to find those leaks and stop them.

Rick Carter: At the municipal scale, it is best to take a holistic approach that integrates efficient water supply systems with demand-side conservation techniques and effective stormwater and wastewater practices. In Minnesota, we have a program called GreenStep Cities. There are 29 best practices that cities can follow to become a GreenStep City, and they range from energy-efficiency initiatives to measures for investing in better transportation systems to water-related actions such as demand-side conservation. GreenStep Cities is designed for cities that want to improve their environmental footprint, especially smaller cities that don’t necessarily have the resources themselves to create a plan of action. There are similar programs in other states that provide assistance and recognition.

Laura Bonich: California is leading the way. [It] has passed two landmark pieces of legislation in the past couple of years. The new green building code, CALGreen, limits what kind of plumbing fixtures can be put in homes in new developments. So instead of a 2.5-gallon-per-minute (9 liters) showerhead, for example, you’re only allowed a two-gallon-per-minute (8 liters) showerhead. As a result, all new development in California is using 50 percent of the water used by homes built before the legislation took effect. Another piece of legislation, which takes effect in 2017, will require that every time a home built before 1994 is sold, the indoor fixtures will have to be retrofitted to meet the CALGreen code. So our existing water infrastructure is going to be able to serve more new development than ever.

How do regulations and policies sometimes get in the way of water conservation?

Byron Stigge: When it comes to agricultural uses of water, the opportunities for savings are enormous. But most states in the West have water rights laws that are based on how long you have had the rights to use the water. And if you don’t use the water that you have allocated to your agricultural or industrial use, your allocation is reduced. So this incentivizes consumption of water regardless of the water supply. In regard to the built environment, my firm does a lot of work in developing countries like Mexico, India, and [those in] Africa. In these places, it is common practice to use recycled water, both from rainwater and treated wastewater. Singapore is even mixing small amounts of recycled water into its drinking water supply. The regulatory environment in the United States is not as open to these kinds of solutions. But for regions beginning to experience severe drought, these regulations may need to be rethought.

CARTER: Too many policies and laws actually encourage more water consumption. For example, until not that long ago, waterless urinals were not legal in Minnesota. This year, the state finally adopted a plumbing code that regulates rainwater harvesting for indoor use, but outdoor reuse for irrigation is still unregulated. Without clear and effective guidelines for proven systems, designers, building owners, and code officials struggle with effectively implementing them in projects. Also, some cities have rules for the built environment that require landscaping of a kind that can’t thrive without a significant amount of irrigation. That means the law is essentially requiring people to use more water than they should be.

Bonich: In the last five years, the technologies available for understanding how much water cities consume have gotten much better. But municipal and state governments haven’t necessarily taken into account the effect that conservation technologies have had on water use. A lot of the infrastructure that’s being designed and the master planning being done relies on ten years of historical water use data as an indicator of how much water a new development will use. But that’s not a good indicator anymore, because so much has changed in the last few years. So a lot of municipalities are still overplanning their future infrastructure requirements. We need to shift the investment in infrastructure. If we can build smaller potable water and wastewater systems, and instead spend those dollars building reclaimed water systems, that would make a big difference.
What are the best ways to use data about availability and use of water to encourage conservation?

Carter: To track the progress of cities involved in the GreenStep Cities program, we started the Regional Indicators Initiative in Minnesota. We gather data about energy, water, vehicle miles traveled, and waste. Then we analyze it and present it in a way that people can grasp. The way we present the data on the Regional Indicators website graphically shows the consumption of water and other resources. We’ve found that makes the biggest difference. You can look at spreadsheets all day long, but it doesn’t sink in until you see a bar chart showing that your city’s water use is two times higher than [that of] all the rest of them. We separate water data by residential and commercial/industrial uses so we can analyze trends, and that makes a real difference, too. It’s one thing to look at the total water consumption in a city and try and normalize it, and another to show what’s actually coming out of the tap per household or per capita.

Merrill: Most states have regulations based on engineering standards that estimate how many gallons of water per day will be used by a residential, commercial, or industrial development. For example, in Massachusetts, if you’re building a single-family home, the number is 110 gallons (416 liters) per bedroom per day. So if you have a three-bedroom house, they would estimate that your house might use 330 gallons (1,250 liters) of water per day. For commercial uses, when they’re doing the planning of new facilities, the proponent of the project uses similar standards to estimate how much water will be used daily. Project proponents can then go to the water authority and say, “We think we need X number of gallons a day” for the project. However, the new reality is that regulatory standards are often very conservative, and due to peak demand pricing and emerging water-saving and metering techniques that improve measuring of the time and volume of water use, homes and businesses are often using less water than they used to and lower levels than the standards estimate.

Stigge: Most states and regions in drought-prone areas have a tiered regulatory process whereby they grade the current level of drought, from no drought condition to severe drought. Depending on the level of drought, different degrees of water conservation are required. The key thing is to disseminate that information to the public as clearly as possible, but only as necessary. Just understanding groundwater-level aquifer depletion, or understanding the level of the reservoirs, can have a big impact on people’s water use when these levels are low. For example, Georgia was in a very severe drought situation some years ago, and in that case it made sense to encourage people to take shorter showers and limit lawn watering. But you don’t need to be hammering people about taking shorter showers in New York state, where the water supply is plentiful. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach. The best use of data responds to a region’s climate and varies over time, considering the season’s drought condition.

Completed in 2010, the Student Services Building at the University of Texas at Dallas has water-conserving features such as automatic sensors in faucets, dual-flush toilets, and low-flow urinals. Landscaping is drought-tolerant and uses indigenous plants. (© University of Texas at Dallas)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed in 2010, the Student Services Building at the University of Texas at Dallas has water-conserving features such as automatic sensors in faucets, dual-flush toilets, and low-flow urinals. Landscaping is drought-tolerant and uses indigenous plants. (© University of Texas at Dallas)

What water-saving strategies should individual private developers be embracing more?

Bonich: Because the amount of water infrastructure required for new development is often based on out-of-date historical data, the costs to build that infrastructure are higher than they need to be. Residual land value can be driven way down by infrastructure costs. If your new building will use only half as much water as the same building constructed ten years ago, the sewer pipe and the water pipe could be half as big. Developers could be more proactive and ask their design teams, “Is that the infrastructure we really need, or is that just the infrastructure [called for by] the city code created 40 years ago?” But time is money, and it would take a lot of time and effort for a developer to go to the city and ask the city to change those standards.

Merrill: For an urban developer constructing a high-rise or mixed-use building, installing highly efficient plumbing fixtures that meet LEED [the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design rating system] standards is probably the most important strategy. For a developer of a master-planned community, not only are the fixtures important, but also the policies that govern how homeowners can use water for their lawns and how water is disposed of after use. Many master-planned communities will now use treated wastewater and recaptured rainwater for irrigation.

Carter: [Private developers should embrace low-maintenance] drought-tolerant native landscapes that incorporate stormwater best management practices. In the Twin Cities, nearly one quarter of our drinking water is used for irrigation. Developers should embrace landscapes that conserve potable water by reducing irrigation requirements, protect drinking water sources from pollution associated with stormwater runoff, replenish groundwater through infiltration, and create a beautiful public realm that increases property values. Because they capture stormwater, these landscapes can drastically reduce irrigation costs and stormwater fees.

Stigge: The best developers I work with are very attuned to their customers, their climate, their region, and their local political situation. When you’re attuned to your climate, you naturally select plantings that require minimal watering, and you naturally select from the wide range of low-flow fixtures that are available. To my mind, the biggest savings are possible with discretionary water use in the landscaping. I work with developers in places like India and Africa, where projects require on-site wastewater treatment. And most projects in India are required by law to incorporate rainwater harvesting. So in a way, some developing countries are forced to be on the cutting edge because of the limitations of their cities’ sewer systems and drinking water networks. In the United States, the best projects have a responsible landscape plan that has the appropriate amount of irrigation.

What other issues related to water should more people know about?

Bonich: Electricity and natural gas are regulated by the federal government, but water and sewer systems are regulated locally. So I might convince a water district to adopt the right conservation standards and to project future water use based on the assumption that new homes really are going to use less water. But then in the next town, I have to start all over explaining these issues to the water district there. It would be great if we could get federal legislation that requires ultra-low-flow fixtures or limits outdoor landscape irrigation, but water is regulated by local municipal ordinance.

Stigge: I’ve studied water systems extensively around the world, and my assessment is that the use of potable water in buildings can be reduced by about 20 or 30 percent just by using water-saving technologies. But the total amount of water used for human activities in buildings, like drinking, bathing, and washing, is relatively small. We actually eat more water than we drink: according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, nearly 80 percent of water is used for agricultural uses across the United States. So to really conserve water, we have to address the agricultural sector.

Merrill: Many metropolitan water authorities are serving more people with less water than they ever have, because of all the water-saving technologies and strategies now available. If everybody in a community or region had low-flow toilets and low-flow showerheads, that would greatly reduce water consumption. The biggest impact comes from many people making a small change.

Ron Nyren is a freelance architecture and urban planning writer based in the San Francisco Bay area.

 

Article by Ron Nyren

December 2, 2016

Link to article http://urbanland.uli.org/sustainability/outlook-water-conservation-can-reshape-built-environment-use-less-water/

 

+  LHB Announces New Shareholders, December 2, 2016

LHB Announces New Shareholders

December 2, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (December 2, 2016) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce that Stacee Demmer, Ray Somrock, Todd Mell, Jason Wedel, Jean Farmakes, and Nick Vreeland were elected as LHB Shareholders. Incorporated in 1966, LHB continues to be a privately-held, employee-shareholder-owned company.

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Stacee Demmer, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C joined LHB in 2014 with a wide-ranging portfolio including commercial, recreational, government, and education design projects. Stacee, an architecture project manager at LHB, is a licensed architect in Minnesota with 15 years of experience.

Stacee is a graduate of Iowa State University where she earned her Bachelor of Architecture degree. She is certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) and has earned her U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional and Building Design and Construction Accreditations. Stacee is a member of the American Institute of Architects, Minnesota, and has served on the Coon Rapids City Office’s Sustainability Commission for seven years.

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Ray Somrock, a Senior Electrical Designer, has worked with LHB’s Pipeline Group for four years. His background includes electrical power and control design, including electrical building layouts, VFD and switchgear control, PLC layout, power distribution, and control schematics. One of Ray’s specialties is to provide our oil and gas customers with electrical engineering design and construction support on major pipeline projects.

Ray is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering degree. As a native of Duluth and avid outdoorsmen, he enjoys the benefits the Northland has to offer and looks forward to investing in the community through investment in the area’s commerce.

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Todd Mell, PE, QCXP, LEED AP BD+C joined LHB in 2013 with experience in the design and commissioning of mechanical systems. As a Certified Qualified Commissioning Process Provider (QCxP), Todd has specialized in commissioning and retro-commissioning of mechanical systems to enhance their performance in addition to HVAC design in a variety of building and project types.

Todd graduated from the University of Minnesota Institute of Technology with a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Design Minor. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Minnesota and has earned his U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional and Building Design and Construction accreditation (LEED AP BD+C).

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Jason Wedel, PE joined LHB in 2014 with a diverse background in both municipal engineering and land development. Jason previously served as the City Engineer for several Minnesota communities including Savage, Lino Lakes and Long Lake.  In addition to city engineering, Jason also has previous experience in land development working throughout the Twin Cities for a national home builder.  Jason, a licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota and North Dakota, is the Municipal Engineering Leader for LHB’s Public Works and Structures Group.

Jason is a graduate of the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering, was appointed to the Sensible Land Use Coalition Board in 2015, is a member of the American Public Works Association and the City Engineers Association of Minnesota, and is a recent graduate of the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce Leadership Twin Cities program.

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Jean Farmakes, JD, CDT joined LHB in 2014 as the firm’s General Counsel.  Jean is a graduate of St. Olaf College with a B. A. in Political Science and the University of Minnesota Law School, where she served on the Minnesota Law Review.  She was admitted to the Minnesota bar in 2002 and the Illinois bar in 2007.  Prior to joining LHB, Jean gained diverse legal experience through judicial clerkships, practicing product liability litigation for a Minnesota law firm, and serving as in-house counsel for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.  Her expertise and experience in state and federal law help LHB manage risks.

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Nick Vreeland, AIA, LEED AP BD+C is a licensed architect in LHB’s Minneapolis office with over 10 years of experience working on a variety of project types including public, commercial, higher education, and multi-family housing. Nick’s focus on high-quality design allows him to understand and incorporate the client’s needs while respecting the environmental and social context of the project.

Nick graduated from McGill University in Montreal with a Master’s of Architecture II, and holds Bachelor’s degrees in Architecture, Sociology, and Environmental Design from North Dakota State University.

+  LHB to Present at 2016 Midwest Facility ..., November 4, 2016

LHB to Present at 2016 Midwest Facility Masters Conference

November 4, 2016

KCH_Kevin_Holm_N2_mediumKrista Pascoe_0036_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin (November 4, 2016) – LHB’s Kevin Holm, AIA, LEED AP BD+C and Senior Marketing Coordinator, Krista Pascoe will present at the 2016 Midwest Facilities Masters Conference at the Kalahari Resort and Conference Center in Wisconsin Dells, WI on Monday, November 7th at 10:30a.m.

The presentation will describe how LHB supported the School District of Superior with their efforts to pass a $92.5 million district referendum in 2015 that would improve underperforming school facilities.

The Midwest Facility Masters Conference is for facility managers, buildings and grounds supervisors, school business managers and district administrators to gain a new perspective on technology, procedures, processes, and impacts of the facility and staffing decisions in their districts. For more conference information visit http://www.wasbo.com/facilitymasters

+  LHB Recognized by Architectural Record, ..., November 1, 2016

LHB Recognized by Architectural Record, Engineering News Record, and the Zweig Group

November 1, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin (November 1, 2016) – LHB ranked as one of the top architectural firms in the nation by Architectural Record placing No. 261. Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List ranks companies by revenue (in millions of dollars) for architectural services performed in 2015. For more information: http://www.architecturalrecord.com/Top300/2016-Top-300-Architecture-Firms-1

LHB ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural design firms in the nation by Engineering News-Record (ENR) at No. 344. The ENR list ranks the 500 largest U.S.-based designs firms, both publicly and privately held based on design-specific revenue.

More info at: http://www.enr.com/toplists/2016_Top_500_Design_Firms1

LHB received a 2016 Fast Growth Award from the Zweig Group. The Zweig Group recognizes fast growing architecture, engineering, planning, and environmental consulting firms in the United States and Canada. These firms have outperformed the economy and competitors to become leaders in their chosen fields.

More info at: https://zweiggroup.com/awards/the-zweig-letter-hot-firm-list/

+  Seward Co-op Friendship Store is LEED Ce..., October 21, 2016

Seward Co-op Friendship Store is LEED Certified

October 21, 2016

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Duluth, Minneapolis, and Cambridge, MN (October 21, 2016) –  Seward Co-op Friendship Store acquired LEED Certification.

As the second location of Seward Co-op, the Friendship Store was designed to be a full service grocery store with community amenities and a high degree of energy efficiency and environmental responsibility. Working together as a team striving for a sustainable and functional project, the Friendship Store involved collaboration between Seward Co-op management, the construction manager, and the architectural and engineering team working to include innovative and creative solutions. The team’s valuable perspective helped identify design and construction issues. Together, the team participated in solutions that balanced the design intent, initial cost, and the desire to minimize future operating costs.

LEED Certified projects are more efficient, use less water and energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Bottom line – LEED Certified projects save money! LHB has designed LEED certified projects ranging from Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Certification.

+  LHB’s Dan Stine to Attend Internat..., October 18, 2016

LHB’s Dan Stine to Attend International AutoDesk Event

October 18, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin (October 18, 2016) – LHB’s VDC/BIM Administrator, Daniel Stine has been invited to participate in Autodesk’s Inside the Factory: Live 2016 event in Shanghai, China October 25 – 28.

During the Inside the Factory: Live! event, customers will meet and work for 4 days with the development teams directly responsible for designing, developing, and testing Revit – the leading parametric building design software used by architects and engineers.

Stine, CSI, CDT, is an author, instructor, BIM Administrator, and Wisconsin-registered Architect with 23 years of experience. He has spoken at past Revit Technology Conference events since 2011, and was rated one of the Top 10 Speakers at the Revit Technology Conference North America 2012 and at the Revit Technology Conference Asia 2015 in Singapore. Working full-time at LHB, Stine provides training and support for all disciplines working in Autodesk® Revit® (Architecture, Structure and MEP), AutoCAD® Civil 3D®, and AutoCAD. Leveraging his professional experience, Stine has also written several textbooks on Revit, AutoCAD, Autodesk, and SketchUp.

+  New energy action plan offers roadmap to..., October 6, 2016

New energy action plan offers roadmap to reach Minnesota’s energy goals

October 6, 2016

SAINT PAUL – A newly-released 2025 Energy Action Plan lays a path for Minnesota to meet or exceed its renewable energy and energy efficiency goals, while boosting the state’s economy.

Minnesota currently imports 72 percent of the energy it consumes, mostly fossil fuels such as coal and oil. The new report recommends ways to leverage opportunities over the next decade to reduce this dependence and increase Minnesota’s use of clean, affordable, reliable and resilient energy.

“The bipartisan work of Governor Pawlenty and the Legislature in 2007 shows Minnesota can work across party lines to reduce carbon emissions and increase renewable energy use, without sacrificing reliability or cost effectiveness,” said Lt. Governor Tina Smith. “The 2025 Energy Action Plan continues this work, and outlines the path to meeting our long-term renewable energy and emission reduction goals. I look forward to working with stakeholders and the Legislature next year to build an energy future that is good for our environment, health, and economy.”

“Minnesota has long been a leader in innovative energy policies,” said Minnesota Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman, whose agency serves as the state energy office. “Our state is poised to extend that leadership, as the 2025 Action Plan provides a roadmap to continue moving forward on the state’s renewable energy and energy efficiency goals. It is a strategy that will create jobs, strengthen our economy and reduce pollution that threatens the environment and people’s health.”

The Action Plan is the result of a two-year project funded by a competitive grant awarded to the state by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Minnesota’s energy landscape has changed dramatically in the past decade. The state’s coal-fired electricity dropped to 44 percent in 2015 from 62 percent in 2005, while electricity generated from renewable energy increased to 21 percent in 2015, compared to just six percent a decade earlier. That puts Minnesota well on pace to exceed its Renewable Electricity Standard of generating 25 percent of the state’s electricity from renewables by 2025.

The 2025 Energy Action Plan charts strategies for continued clean energy growth over the next decade. Strategies are recommended under five categories:

  • Transportation. This sector shows the potential for increased use of electric and alternative-fuel vehicles, which will reduce oil dependence and carbon pollution as well as energy costs.
  • Energy supply and grid modernization. Modernizing the electric grid enables more two-way flows of electricity, allowing for increased large-scale use of wind and solar energy.
  • Efficient buildings and integrated energy systems. High-performance building designs unlock new opportunities for energy efficiency and savings, while more integrated energy systems such as combined heat and power increase power plant efficiency and reduce energy waste.
  • Industrial and agricultural processes. Minnesota’s industrial and agricultural sectors are well positioned for further energy leadership by advancing energy productivity, promoting clean energy and commercializing bioenergy resources such as advanced biofuels.
  • Local planning and action. Through their own energy planning, local governments and tribal nations will be key stakeholders in achieving progress toward cleaner, more resilient energy systems.

“What really sets the 2025 Energy Action Plan apart from other energy planning efforts is the stakeholder-driven approach that identifies actionable steps to enable key energy strategies and technologies over the next 10 years,” said Stephen Doig, Managing Director for the Rocky Mountain Institute, which prepared the report.

The project was coordinated by staff from the Rocky Mountain Institute, Minnesota Commerce Department, Minnesota Legislative Energy Commission, Great Plains Institute and LHB, Inc. The project team worked closely with a multidisciplinary group of more than 50 stakeholders across the state to collect input on energy technologies and strategies.

A webinar to provide an overview of the 2025 Energy Action Plan and discuss next steps will be held on Wednesday, October 12, 1:30-3:00 p.m. (CDT). Register for the webinar. Download the 2025 Energy Action Plan.

See what members of the Stakeholder Advisory Committee have to say about the 2025 Energy Action Plan.

Media Contact: Ross Corson Director of Communications Minnesota Department of Commerce
P: 651-539-1463 | C: 651-368-5050ross.corson@state.mn.us

Link to MN Department of Commerce Press Release: http://mn.gov/commerce/media/news/?id=259223

+  LHB to Present at 2016 Greenbuild Intern..., September 22, 2016

LHB to Present at 2016 Greenbuild International Conference

September 22, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin (September 22, 2016) – LHB’s Rick Carter, FAIA, LEED Fellow, and Becky Alexander, AIA, will present alongside Shannon Pinc, Environment and Sustainability Coordinator for the City of St. Louis Park, MN at the 2016 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo on “Scaling Up: Data Driven Design at a City Scale”. The presentation will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles, California on Thursday, October 6th at 2:00 p.m.

The presentation will describe how Minnesota cities are getting on track to meet their sustainability goals by leveraging performance data collected through the Regional Indicators Initiative. The Initiative tracks energy, water, travel, waste, and greenhouse gas emission metrics for over 20 Minnesota cities. Tracking these metrics is helping cities like St. Louis Park understand their baseline performance, strategically plan for the future, and track their progress. More information is available at – http://www.regionalindicatorsmn.com/.

Greenbuild is the world’s largest conference and expo dedicated to green building. Greenbuild brings together industry leaders, experts and frontline professionals dedicated to sustainable building in their everyday work, and a unique energy is sparked. For more conference information visit https://greenbuildexpo.com/Attendee/Home.

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognition, September 19, 2016

LHB Announces Professional Recognition

September 19, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin (September 19, 2016) – LHB Architect Elizabeth Turner, AIA, LEED Green Associate, has recently become a Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC®) through the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS). She is one of twelve CPHC® professionals in Minnesota.

Elizabeth graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Master of Architecture Degree and a Master of Science in Sustainable Design Degree. She has over eight years of architectural design, planning, teaching, and research experience in higher education and multi-family housing. Her work aims to balance the environmental and economic performance of buildings, creating beautiful places that foster community and engage occupants in learning.

Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) is a 501(c)3 organization with a mission to “develop and promote North American passive building standards, practices, and certifications for buildings, professionals, and products to create structures that are durable, resilient, comfortable, healthy, and super energy efficient.” Passive design lowers energy demand for heating and cooling buildings by improving the building envelope (air sealing, insulation, elimination of thermal bridging, solar orientation, and optimization of windows), reducing need for “active” systems that often have a higher cost (mechanical systems and renewable energy). For more information, visit http://www.phius.org/about/mission-history.

+  LHB Announces New Hire, September 15, 2016

LHB Announces New Hire

September 15, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin; (September 15, 2016) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employee to our Minneapolis, MN office:

Mark Kusnierek, AIA, CID, CDT joins the Minneapolis office as a Senior Architect. He has specialized in planning, programing, and project management for school districts across the Midwest for over 15 years. Mark is a licensed architect in Minnesota and Wisconsin and is certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). He is also a Certified Interior Designer (CID) in the state of Minnesota and a Certified Document Technician (CDT) with the Construction Specifications Institute. He is a graduate of North Dakota State University with Bachelor’s Degrees in Environmental Science and in Architecture. Mark’s passion for building performance, occupant comfort, and teaching and learning complement LHB’s commitment to Performance Driven Design.

+  LHB Recognized by the American Society o..., August 29, 2016

LHB Recognized by the American Society of Landscape Architects – Minnesota (ASLA-MN) and the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM)

August 29, 2016

Duluth, Cambridge, and Minneapolis, MN (August 29, 2016) – LHB was awarded the 2016 ASLA-MN Merit Award in Analysis and Planning for the Visual Quality Manual (VQM) for Trunk Highway 100. LHB collaborated with the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) – the project owner, the City of St. Louis Park, and Craig Churchward.

The Visual Quality Manual (VQM) for Trunk Highway 100 reestablishes the stature of this historically significant beltway while honoring the community-defining connection between travelers and neighbors. Although primarily used to guide the design of the reconstruction of TH 100 including bridges and noise walls, it also will serve as a reference for future work by any entity that would affect the public domain of the corridor. More info at: http://asla-mn.org/2016-honors-award-recipients

LHB was awarded an Honor Award from the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM) for the Sisu Heritage Seitaniemi Housebarn in Embarrass, MN. LHB was hired in the summer of 2014 to develop the phase III restoration documents and provide construction administration services to continue the preservation of the 1910 Finnish-style housebarn.

This year marks the 32nd year in which PAM has honored exemplary projects and individuals through the Minnesota Preservation Awards. The Minnesota Preservation Awards program is PAM’s way of recognizing exceptional preservation projects across the state of Minnesota.

More info at: http://www.mnpreservation.org/events/pam-gala-awards/

+  LHB Announces New Hires and Professional..., August 12, 2016

LHB Announces New Hires and Professional Recognition

August 12, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (August 12, 2016) – Emily Larson is now licensed in Minnesota as a Professional Engineer (Civil/Structural). Emily joined LHB in 2015 with her Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from Purdue University. She is working in LHB’s Industrial Group, focusing on structural engineering projects.

Chris Miller, PE, SE, a graduate of North Dakota State University, passed the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) SE Bridge Exam. This 16-hour exam is specifically designed to test an engineer’s ability to safely design buildings or bridges, particularly in areas of high seismicity and high wind. For more information, http://ncees.org/exams/se-exam/

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

Brian Glur, Assoc. AIA, joins the Minneapolis office as a Designer. Brian graduated from North Dakota State University with his Master of Architecture degree. He also logged 2,300 approved hours with the Intern Development Program run by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) and the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Mitch Rosendahl joins the Duluth office as a Civil Designer. He graduated from North Dakota State University with his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering degree. Mitch is a 2nd Lieutenant in the Minnesota Army National Guard and belongs to the 850th Horizontal Engineer Company based out of Cambridge, MN.

Raymond “Bud” Brasch, PE, LEED AP joins the Minneapolis office as a Mechanical Engineer. He has been a licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota since 1993. Bud has over 20 years of mechanical engineering experience. He is a member of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) – Minnesota Chapter.

Garett Henriksen joins the Duluth office as an Electrical Designer working with the pipeline group. Garett graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree.

Zitong Wang joins the Minneapolis office as an Intern. She is currently pursuing her Master’s in Landscape Architecture degree at the University of Minnesota, where she also earned her Bachelor of Environmental Design degree.

Scott Crawford returns to the Duluth office as an Intern. Scott is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Business of Administration degree at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Reilly Kedrowski returns to the Duluth office as an Intern. Reilly is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree at the University of North Dakota. Reilly is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

Zach Whitley joins the Duluth office as an Intern. Zach is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Kavwimba Mdumuka joins the Minneapolis office as an Intern. Kav is currently pursuing his Masters of Architecture degree at the University of Minnesota. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree from the University of Kentucky.

Nick Lemke joins the Minneapolis office as an Intern. Nick begins his freshmen year this fall at North Dakota State University. He is pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering.

Mauricio Leon joins the Minneapolis office as an Intern. Mauricio is currently pursuing his Master of Science in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy degree at the University of Minnesota.

Adam Giannini joins the Duluth office as an Intern. Adam is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Aaron Fine joins the Minneapolis office as an Intern. Aaron is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree from the University of Minnesota. Aaron is also a member and the Assistant Treasurer of the Sigma Alpha MU Fraternity.

 

 

 

+  LHB’s Stine and Carter to Speak at Con..., July 11, 2016

LHB’s Stine and Carter to Speak at Conferences

July 11, 2016

Dan Stine-0031_mediumRAC_Rick_Carter_mediumMinnesota and Wisconsin (July 11, 2016) – LHB BIM Administrator, Daniel Stine will present this week at the Revit Technology Conference North America (RTCNA) in Scottsdale, AZ, and LHB’s Senior Vice President, Rick Carter, FAIA, LEED Fellow, will present next week at the National Association of College and University Business Officers’ (NACUBO) 2016 Annual Meeting in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

At the Revit Technology Conference North America (RTCNA), Daniel will present: 1) Professional Lighting Design in Revit using ElumTools at 3:30pm Friday, July 15, and 2) Energy Simulation with Revit and Autodesk Insight 360 at 10:45am Saturday, July 16. For more information: http://www.rtcevents.com/2016/na/rtc/

LHB Senior Vice President, Rick Carter, FAIA, LEED Fellow will present at the National Association of College and University Business Officers’ (NACUBO) 2016 Annual Meeting on “Net-zero Tools for Building and Operations” at the Palais des congrès de Montréal in Montreal, Quebec on Monday, July 18th at 8:30 a.m. For more information on NACUBO visit http://www.nacuboannualmeeting.org/.

Carter is presenting alongside two University of Minnesota-Morris Vice Chancellors, Bryan Herrmann, Vice Chancellor of Finance and Facilities and Sandy Olson-Loy, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and Jason Steinbock, Principal with The Weidt Group. The presentation focuses on setting ambitious sustainability goals, strategies for working with a design team, plug load and peak load reductions, and a case study on the Green Prairie Living & Learning Community residence hall on the University of Minnesota – Morris campus that details the results of the post-occupancy evaluation regarding resident satisfaction, and how residents help achieve energy conservation. The project is LEED NC Gold Certified, and its design met the B3 Guidelines and the SB 2030 Energy Standard. This was one of the first projects to receive a Best of B3 Award from the State of Minnesota in the SB 2030 category for its predicted energy performance.

+  LHB Recognized by Illumination Engineeri..., July 5, 2016

LHB Recognized by Illumination Engineering Society

July 5, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin (July 5, 2016) – The Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College (WITC)-Superior Student Commons Remodel Project was awarded a section award in the Energy and Environmental Design Category from the Illumination Engineering Society (IES) Minneapolis-St. Paul Section. LHB provided architectural and engineering services for the remodel of WITC’s existing Student Commons Area, Library, Testing Rooms, Classroom, and Accessible Toilet Rooms.

LHB evaluated the current day functions within the spaces and created a design that focused on integrating technology and increasing student social interactions. The multi-use functions of the space accommodate an energetic gaming area, that is visible, yet separate from a quiet study area and lounge that can be used for dining and event presentations. The new atrium takes all of these functions into consideration while providing flexibility for the future.

The newly remodeled student commons area uses only LED lighting in place of the previously used fluorescent fixtures. Project designers used a networked lighting control system to help the campus monitor lighting energy use and allow different scene settings for special events. The system also utilizes daylight harvesting to dim the lights when adequate daylight is available, providing additional energy and cost savings. LHB helped WITC attain funding from the State of Wisconsin’s Focus on Energy program. The program provides financial incentives for reduced energy consumption by replacing fixtures with LED lights, and using daylight/occupancy censoring to reduce the use of fixtures during hours of operation.

The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) is the recognized technical authority on illumination. For over 100 years; its objective has been to communicate information on all aspects of good lighting practice to its members, to the lighting community, and to consumers, through a variety of programs, publications, and services. For more information: http://www.ies.org/

+  Star Tribune Names LHB a 2016 Top Workpl..., June 28, 2016

Star Tribune Names LHB a 2016 Top Workplace

June 28, 2016

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Duluth, Cambridge, and Minneapolis, MN (June 28, 2016) – LHB was named one of the Top Workplaces in Minnesota by the Star Tribune. The Top Workplaces special section was published in the Star Tribune on Sunday, June 26. http://www.topworkplaces.com/frontend.php/regional-list/company/startribune/lhb-inc

“We strive to provide our clients with highly talented staff who are motivated to help achieve their project goals. Participating in this survey was a helpful way to assess and identify priorities as we focus on retaining our valued staff and attracting talented new employees to our company,” noted LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, PE.

Star Tribune Publisher Michael J. Klingensmith said, “The companies in the Star Tribune Top Workplaces deserve high praise for creating the very best work environments in the state of Minnesota. My congratulations to each of these exceptional companies.”

Top Workplaces recognizes the most progressive companies in Minnesota based on employee opinions measuring engagement, organizational health and satisfaction. The analysis included responses from over 73,870 employees at Minnesota public, private and nonprofit organizations.

The results of the Star Tribune’s Top Workplaces are based on survey information collected by WorkplaceDynamics, an independent company specializing in employee engagement and retention.

+  LHB Recognized by Engineering News-Recor..., June 22, 2016

LHB Recognized by Engineering News-Record and the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal

June 22, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin (June 22, 2016) – LHB ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural design firms in the nation by Engineering News-Record (ENR) at No. 344. The ENR list ranks the 500 largest U.S.-based designs firms, both publicly and privately held based on design-specific revenue.

More info at: http://www.enr.com/toplists/2016_Top_500_Design_Firms1

LHB was also ranked as one of the Top 25 Architectural Firms located in the Twin Cities metro-area by the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal. The list ranks firms based on architectural billings.

More info at: http://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/datacenter/lists

 

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognitions ..., May 27, 2016

LHB Announces Professional Recognitions and New Hires

May 27, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin; (May 25, 2016) – Elizabeth K. Tomlinson, PE, EMP, QCXP, LEED AP BD+C, CDT, received her Energy Management Professional (EMP) certification from the Energy Management Association. Elizabeth, a Mechanical Project Manager at LHB, has 15 years of mechanical design and commissioning experience for government, education, and commercial clients. Elizabeth is a licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota, an Xcel Energy Recommissioning Service Provider, and a member of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Minnesota Chapter.

Mechanical Designers Dylan Mattson, Alec Ashton, and Chris Clements, and Mechanical Engineer, Todd Mell, PE, QCXP, LEED AP BD+C, all received their Construction Documents Technology (CDT) certifications from the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI). The CDT certification demonstrates a comprehensive level of competence for those who write, interpret, enforce, or manage construction documents. The mission of CSI is to advance building information management and education of project teams to improve facility performance. For more information see http://www.csinet.org/

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Integrative Design Team:

Laura Faucher, AIA, joins the Minneapolis office as an Architect focusing on historic and existing buildings. Laura holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture and Environmental Design from North Dakota State University and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Concordia College. Laura is the chair of the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission and served multiple volunteer roles with the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota for over six years.

Jim Muehlbauer, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, joins the Minneapolis office as a Senior Architect (WI only). Jim graduated from the University of Minnesota’s Architecture program with his Bachelor of Arts degree. He is actively involved with the Minnesota Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council.

Michael Madden, RA, LEED AP, joins the Minneapolis office as an Architect. Michael graduated from Iowa State University’s Architecture Program with his Bachelor’s degree. Michael has been licensed as an Architect in the State of Minnesota for over 10 years, has been a LEED Accredited Professional for eight years, and recently became certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards.

 

 

+  LHB’s Daniel Stine to Speak at 12th Au..., April 27, 2016

LHB’s Daniel Stine to Speak at 12th Australia Revit Technology Conference

April 27, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin (April 27, 2016) – LHB’s VDC/BIM Administrator, Daniel Stine will present May 12-14 in Australia at the 2016 Revit Technology Conference (RTC) Australasia.

Stine will speak at the twelfth RTC in Hunter Valley, Australia. An expert in virtual design and construction (VDC) and building information modeling (BIM) software, Daniel will be presenting three sessions at this international conference: 1) Interior Design Workflows, 2) Remodels and Alternates in MEP World – Part A and B, and 3) Mastering Materials; getting what you want from Revit.

Stine, CSI, CDT, is an author, instructor, BIM Administrator, and Wisconsin-registered Architect with 23 years of experience. He has spoken at past RTC events since 2011, and was rated one of the Top 10 Speakers at the RTC North America 2012 Conference and at the RTC Asia 2015 conference in Singapore. Working full-time at LHB, Stine provides training and support for all disciplines working in Autodesk® Revit® (Architecture, Structure and MEP), AutoCAD® Civil 3D®, and AutoCAD. Leveraging his professional experience, Stine has also written several textbooks on Revit, AutoCAD, Autodesk, and SketchUp.

RTC Australia will be held at the Crowne Plaza in Hunter Valley, Australia from 12 May – 14 May 2016. The conference provides attendees with the opportunity to learn from some of the world’s top instructors and industry experts, share ideas and insights with an international community of peers, and explore the latest trends and technologies. Revit is a parametric 3D modeling and information management software being widely adopted by AEC firms worldwide. For more information: http://rtcevents.cvent.com/events/rtc-australasia-2016/event-summary 9c6cd7c027bb40849aba860d2236a676.aspx

+  LHB CEO Awarded UMD Entrepreneurial Lead..., April 22, 2016

LHB CEO Awarded UMD Entrepreneurial Leadership Award

April 22, 2016

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Minnesota and Wisconsin; (April 21, 2016) – LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, was presented with the Entrepreneurial Leadership Award from the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) Center for Economic Development (CED) at the 24th Annual Joel Labovitz Entrepreneurial Success Awards luncheon ceremony on April 20.

Bennett was honored for his leadership at LHB and beyond. He has been actively engaged in economic development activities in Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin for 35 years, and is a strong supporter of higher education and workforce development. He has served on the boards of APEX, the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, Greater Downtown Council, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Council of Engineering Companies of Minnesota, and the Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce. He served as the initial chair of the Duluth Chamber’s Military Affairs Committee and in 2011 was named the Duluth Chamber’s Volunteer of the Year.

Bennett was Chair of the UMD Civil Engineering External Advisory Board, and a member of the UMD College of Engineering and Science External Advisory Board. He has been active in legislative advocacy for our region focusing on transportation, education, energy, and general business-related policy issues.  In addition to the business and professional related organizations, he has also served on the United Way of Greater Duluth Board, and Memorial Blood Centers and LISC Advisory Boards.

During his 15 years as CEO, LHB has received numerous state and national awards, including being named Firm of the Year by the American Council of Engineering Companies in Minnesota.

Bennett said in his acceptance comments, “It is a great honor to be recognized with an Entrepreneurial Leadership award at this year’s event. Our entrepreneurial spirit at LHB has driven our growth starting from our inception in 1966. Good staff and loyal clients have been the underlying foundation of our success through the years.”

Since 1993, the Joel Labovitz Entrepreneurial Success Awards have recognized small business owners who have dared to dream, taken risks and invested in the region. This year’s award recipients, honored as part of Small Business Week, were selected from 52 nominees from throughout the Twin Ports and Arrowhead Region. https://umdced.wp.d.umn.edu/workshops-events/joel-labovitz-entrepreneurial-success-awards/

+  LHB Joins Memorial Blood Centers’ ..., April 20, 2016

LHB Joins Memorial Blood Centers’ 100 Club

April 20, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (April 20, 2016) – LHB was recently inducted into Memorial Blood Centers’ 100 Club on April 19, 2016.

LHB has hosted blood drives with Memorial Blood Centers (MBC) for 20 years. In 2015, LHB joined efforts with Minnesota Power to host a blood drive. Collectively, the drive donated 126 units of blood, qualifying LHB to join the 100 Club.

“LHB is a very dedicated sponsor and supporter of our life-saving mission at Memorial Blood Centers. As a local non-profit organization, we rely on our local partners to host regular blood drives. This allows us to collect an adequate supply for patients in our local hospitals. Blood donors are truly special for giving of themselves so that others might live,” noted MBC Lead Donor Recruitment Representative, Michele Keil.

“All of us at LHB are very proud to be recognized for helping save lives with Memorial Blood Centers. It has been important to our company and staff to give back to the communities where we live and work. We know that the blood we are all donating is going to hospitals that support our family and friends,” noted LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, PE.

To schedule a blood donation appointment or blood drive, visit http://www.mbc.org/Home.

About Memorial Blood Centers

Memorial Blood Centers has been saving lives for over 65 years as an independent nonprofit supplying life-saving blood to area hospitals and other partners throughout the U.S. Operating 10 donor centers and conducting hundreds of blood drives each month, Memorial Blood Centers also provides comprehensive testing and expert technical services as a national leader in transfusion medicine. For more information, call 1-888-GIVE-BLD (1-888-448-3253) or visit MBC.ORG. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

+  LHB Announces New Hires, April 13, 2016

LHB Announces New Hires

April 13, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (April 13, 2016) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

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Jennifer Dagenais-Brunder joins the Duluth office as an Interior Designer. Jennifer graduated from Bemidji State University with a Bachelor of Science in Design Technology.

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Wendy Muench joins the Minneapolis office as a Lead Technician. Wendy earned her Architectural Technology Diploma from Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

+  Sustainable: ‘WELL Building Standa..., April 5, 2016

Sustainable: ‘WELL Building Standard’ offers breath of fresh air

April 5, 2016

Cleaner indoor air and more opportunities to reduce screen time to improve employee health have become the new frontier for the construction industry after years of focusing on energy and water.

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification, more commonly known as LEED, has propelled architects and builders to increase energy efficiency and reduce water consumption for years through a stringent point system created by the Washington, D.C.-based United States Green Building Council.

Now, that organization is helping with development of a similar certification program, the WELL Building Standard, the brainchild of the International WELL Building Institute in Washington, D.C.

It’s a big enough concern, in fact, that Mayo Clinic has teamed with New York City-based Delos Living LLC, which developed the standard, to build a first-in-the-world research laboratory in Rochester, Minnesota, to study indoor environment and human health.

“WELL is focused on getting the building occupants — the users — to be as high-performance as possible by looking at physical, mental and emotional well-being,” said Becky Alexander, a researcher and designer in Duluth-based LHB Inc.’s Minneapolis office.

In the past, companies have targeted design efforts to “maximize efficiency so you don’t have to get up from your desk and you can do everything from one spot,” she added. “But what we’re realizing is that sitting is the new smoking in that people are getting sick from sitting too much, which is related to a sedentary lifestyle.”

Dana Pillai, leader of Delos Labs and executive director of the Well Living Lab at Rochester, said the approach encourages the inclusion of health in building design and functionality.

“Buildings have an effect on [health] and sometimes those effects are negative, and sometimes positive,” he said. “By taking it to the next level we’re forcing participants in the whole process to think about what those effects might be.”

Paul Scialla, founder of the International WELL Building Institute and founder and CEO of Delos, said in an email that people spend 90 percent of their time indoors between their homes, offices, schools and stores.

The new standard “marries best practices in design and construction with evidence-based medical and scientific research — harnessing the built environment as a vehicle to support human health and well-being,” he said.

WELL offers the same systemic approach of LEED. Building performance metrics focus on seven issues involving health and wellness: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. Compliance levels are platinum, gold and silver. Professionals can get WELL accreditation.

The organization’s website reports more than 100 projects representing upward of 22 million square feet have already been registered or certified.

None is in the Twin Cities, but that likely will change soon. Alexander’s firm and Minneapolis-based HGA Architects and Engineers have clients interested in certification.

Peter Dahl, director of sustainability for HGA, pointed out that his “lunch and learn” talk in March drew 25 to 30 people interested in the WELL philosophy and certification process.

Why the emphasis on employee health?

“People are interested in it as they realize that employees are their greatest asset,” said Alexander. “The clients we’re working with feel like all the other things — energy and water, for example — will be taken care of as a matter of practice now. Employee health is something that hasn’t gotten that same attention.”

Her colleague, architect Rick Carter, offers some other comparisons. Employee costs per square foot are 10 times construction costs and 100 times energy costs.

“People are much more expensive than building and energy and materials,” he said.

A study released by Harvard University pointed out that cognitive levels of employees in green buildings were higher than those in a typical office, Dahl said. Indoor pollutants and carbon dioxide levels were lower, too, leading to higher performance, he noted.

Employees earning $65,000, for instance, could be 10 percent more productive in a healthy building, offering their employers a nice dividend for the investment in improved indoor air quality, Dahl said.

The challenges WELL faces include communicating how the benefits of an improved indoor environment give companies “a competitive edge” and convincing building owners that the investment will pay off in more satisfied — and perhaps higher paying — tenants.

As Dahl sees it, WELL and LEED have some similarities. About 13 of LEED’s 65 points deal with some aspect of indoor air quality, he said. In creating a WELL building, architects and designers will focus on “daylighting” and air ventilation to ensure clean, fresh air is available throughout the day.

Alexander notes office layouts might change and current trends will continue. Staircases, once ignored, are becoming front and center in many offices to encourage employees to walk between floors, she said.

Instead of placing printers an every desk, a central print station forces employees to leave their screens to gather materials, Alexander said. More access to natural sunlight and outdoor areas makes for happier employees. Treadmill desks are also beneficial.

One of the seven pillars that shows up in WELL’s 238-page standard — each with many subcategories — is nourishment.

Pillai believes decent food is an overlooked virtue. “We realized a lot of corporations are providing food to their employees and those employees are staying longer at work,” he said. “We wanted to make nutrition up front and center … with an emphasis on fruit and vegetables.”

At the 7,500-square-foot laboratory Pillai operates on the Mayo campus, building equipment has been installed to measure air flow and other factors. People with medical conditions are tested to see how they respond to the indoor environment, he said.

Of course, there is a cost to WELL. Becoming certified works out to around $60 per employee for a 250,000-square-foot building, Dahl said. That figure increases for smaller buildings but he firmly believes it will be money well-spent for improved productivity, retention and recruitment.

One of the next challenges, said Dahl, is getting multi-tenant building owners and developers interested in WELL.

Even so, Scialla pointed out that the first company in the world to achieve WELL certification was real estate company CBRE, which received it for its corporate headquarters in Los Angeles. CBRE also has agreed to seek certification in 100 buildings, he added, and certify 50 employees.

Owners of buildings seeking WELL certification can also feel a bit warm and fuzzy about their investment because 51 percent of net profits after taxes will go to charitable contributions in health, wellness and the built environment, said Scialla.

WELL’s founders have “a pioneering altruistic capitalism model that will address social responsibility and demonstrate a sustainable model for philanthropy,” he said.

By Frank Jossi, Finance & Commerce

April 5, 2016

 

Link to article http://finance-commerce.com/2016/04/sustainable-well-building-standard-offers-breath-of-fresh-air/

 

+  LHB Selected for Natural Harvest Food Co..., March 18, 2016

LHB Selected for Natural Harvest Food Co-op Project

March 18, 2016

NaturalHarvestCo-opImages 1 Minnesota and Wisconsin; (March 18, 2016) – LHB has been selected to provide architectural and engineering services for the relocation and expansion of Natural Harvest Food Co-op in Virginia, MN.

Natural Harvest Food Co-op is relocating to Silver Lake between the Carpenters Labor Union Hall and Virginia Family Dental. The new 9,000 GSF space will include a classroom, deli, and indoor and outdoor seating area. LHB is providing architectural, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering services. Construction is anticipated to begin near the end of 2016, with an expected opening in mid-2017.

LHB has been involved in several other co-op retail projects including Mississippi Market Natural Foods Co-op on East 7th Street and West 7th Street in St. Paul, the Seward Community Co-op Franklin Creamery Building and Friendship Store in Minneapolis, and Whole Foods Co-op’s Central Hillside and newly opened Denfeld stores in Duluth.

To learn more about this project: http://naturalharvest.coop/our-co-op/expansion-news/

+  LHB Announces Professional Recognitions ..., March 15, 2016

LHB Announces Professional Recognitions and New Hires

March 15, 2016

Minnesota and Wisconsin; (March 15, 2016) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following recognitions and new employees:

Recognitions

Paul Vogel Color_mediumPaul Vogel, PLS was appointed by Governor Mark Dayton to the Minnesota Board of Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture, Geoscience, and Interior Design (AELSLAGID) as a Land Surveyor Board Member effective March 9, 2016 to January 6, 2020. Paul has been with LHB for nine years, and has 26 years of surveying experience. A licensed land surveyor in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Alaska, Paul is also the President of the Minnesota Society of Professional Surveyors (MSPS), a member of the National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS) and Wisconsin Society of Land Surveyors (WSLS), and serves on the Technical Advisory Board of Lake Superior College. He received his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Minnesota Duluth. For more information: http://mn.gov/aelslagid/about.html  and http://mn.gov/governor/newsroom/index.jsp?id=1055-186672#/list/appId//filterType//filterValue//page/1/sort/Date/order/descending

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John Lawless, ASP has completed all requirements for a Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) certification. John joined LHB’s Corporate Office in 2014 as a Safety Specialist. John has over 15 years of experience in helping companies identify loss exposures by analyzing risks and recommending controls. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Master of Industrial Safety with an emphasis in Industrial Hygiene.

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Becky Alexander, AIA was recently appointed to the United States Green Building Council Minnesota Chapter 2016 Market Leader Advisory Board. Becky is an architect and researcher at LHB where she provides a combination of architectural design and performance services. Becky plays a key role in several significant state-wide initiatives to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Minnesota, including the Regional Indicators Initiative and Minnesota’s B3 and SB 2030 programs. Becky’s design and research is supported by a Bachelor of Arts from Carleton College and a Master of Architecture and Master of Science in Architecture – Sustainable Design from the University of Minnesota.

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Susan Gibson, PHR recently obtained her Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification. The certification demonstrates mastery of the technical and operational aspects of HR practices and US laws and regulations. Susan has been with LHB’s Corporate Human Resources Department since 2012.

 

 

 

New Hires

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Elizabeth Turner, AIA, LEED Green Associate rejoins the Minneapolis office as an Architect. Elizabeth graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Master of Architecture and Master of Science in Sustainable Design. She has over eight years of architectural design, teaching, and research experience that supports sustainability goals while improving human health and productivity.

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Zach Whitney joins the Minneapolis office as an Electrical Designer. Zach graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. He is also a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

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Betty Powell joins the Minneapolis office as an Administrative Assistant. Betty graduated from National American University in Brooklyn Center, MN with her Associate’s Degree in Paralegal Studies.

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Angie Martin joins the Minneapolis office as an Administrative Assistant. Angie graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and has a passion for acting and writing.

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Brandon Steffen rejoins the Duluth office as a Survey Technician.

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Ryan Kelly joins the Minneapolis office as a Technician College Intern. Ryan is currently pursuing his Associate’s Degree in Architectural Drafting and Design at Dunwoody College of Technology.

+  Minnesota Local Government Energy Planni..., March 1, 2016

Minnesota Local Government Energy Planning Project Receives State Energy Program Funding

March 1, 2016

Duluth, Minneapolis, and Cambridge, MN (March 1, 2016) – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) selected 11 states including Minnesota to receive a total of $5 million to advance innovative approaches for local clean energy development. This State Energy Program Award will fund the LHB-led Minnesota Local Government Energy Planning Project through 2018.

LHB is leading the Minnesota Local Government Energy Planning Project team that includes the Minnesota Department of Commerce, Energy Transition Lab at the University of Minnesota, Great Plains Institute, and the University of Minnesota’s Center for Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy. The project will create energy planning tools that local governments can use to support significant progress towards Minnesota’s sustainability, energy transition, and greenhouse gas reduction goals.

The State Energy Program Award, supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is granted to fund projects that will reduce energy bills for American families and businesses, protect the environment by reducing carbon emissions, and increase our nation’s energy security. http://energy.gov/eere/wipo/state-energy-program-2015-competitive-award-selections

+  McGregor School District reveals site ex..., February 26, 2016

McGregor School District reveals site expansion plan

February 26, 2016

The McGregor Public School District unveiled its site expansion plans during an informational public meeting held Feb. 16. The district had purchased a parcel of land north of the school in the spring of 2015. Last summer, the existing motel and trailer park were demolished and the site was cleared and has remained vacant.

This past fall, the school board began conceptualizing a site improvement plan for the newly acquired property along with the help of LHB, Inc., an engineering and architectural firm out of Duluth, in order to identify the project needs and budget.

During the course of three meetings, the school board and LHB identified the project goals as follows: creation of a new entrance drive from Hwy. 65 and 210, expansion of the parking lot areas, providing a new gateway for better visibility, improving site connectivity between the school and new parcel of land, increasing green space, enhancing the building appearance at the new entry with a facade and channel block lettering, developing a storm water strategy that addresses existing drainage and building a sense of community.

Heidi Bringman, LHB, Inc., landscape architect, presented an overview of the project during the public meeting. She explained that the site expansion plan will provide the school with a better presence within the community and the additional green space will allow for additional recreational field areas for student use. An improved drop-off/pick-up space near the auditorium doors will be expanded to allow for extended pedestrian space. While this expansion will eliminate approximately eight current parking spots, the new parking lot located on the east (rear) side of the school, will provide 62 new parking spaces for a total of 126. Additional lighting, accent lighting and a monument sign are also included in the plan.

Following her presentation, Bringman invited questions from the audience. One audience member inquired about drainage, since the grade of some of the surrounding property will be slightly elevated and there are a few houses between the current north parking lot and the new entrance. Ms. Bringman explained that new underground culverts will be installed to handle runoff and the nearby homes should not have any adverse effects from the new configuration.

Other audience members inquired about potential traffic issues involving the new gateway leading directly to First Ave. before continuing onto Hwy. 65 and 210 from the parking lot. Anthony Pierce, maintenance supervisor, and Superintendent Paul Grams explained that there would be stop signs for north and southbound traffic at the corner of the auditorium within the school lot. Traffic passing east and west would pass through and have the right-of-way.

At the main entrance on First Ave. near Hwy. 210, the district will recommend a three-way stop, which would stop vehicles coming out of the school entrance and both the east and westbound traffic. Vehicles coming off Hwy. 210 will have the right-of-way and may pass through in any direction. “This is due to the fact that there isn’t enough space for cars to stack in that location without them potentially getting backed up onto the highway,” explained Grams. “The intersection will be controlled by the city and they have the final say with regards to the signs.”

Bringman explained that a traffic study has not been done for the area but that might be warranted in the future if deemed necessary. “Anything beyond the main entrance and First Ave. (on the highway) would require the involvement of MnDOT.”

Another audience member inquired about handicapped parking. Bringman explained that for a parking lot of the proposed size, the district would be required to have five handicapped spaces. The current site has three handicapped parking spots. The location of these spaces will be determined at a later date.

The project will be advertised for bid within the next two weeks. LHB, Inc., will continue to work with the school board to help select a general contractor and award the contract in March. Mobilization and site preparation is anticipated to begin sometime between late-April and mid-May when road restrictions are lifted with construction scheduled to be complete by Aug. 1.

By Shari Horton, AitkinAge.com
February 26, 2016

link to online article

+  New National Guard facility aims to redu..., February 9, 2016

New National Guard facility aims to reduce energy costs

February 9, 2016

The Minnesota Army National Guard’s new $17 million training and maintenance facility in Arden Hills is designed to reduce energy consumption, consolidate previously scattered operations and help prepare soldiers for their missions.

The Guard also sees the federally funded 64,500-square-foot Ben Franklin Readiness Center, which opened last month at 1536 Ben Franklin St., as a valuable recruiting tool and a highly visible link to the community.

“This facility is the face of the National Guard in Arden Hills,” said Capt. Nathan Burr of the Guard’s 834th Aviation Support Battalion, which operates out of the new readiness center.

The center is within the Arden Hills Army Training Site, part of the former Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant land, at the northwest corner of Highway 96 and Lexington Avenue North.

It’s also the latest in a series of military construction projects in Minnesota, with more to come.

Recent projects of note include a $19.5 million education center completed last March at Camp Ripley near Little Falls and a $25 million maintenance shop completed in 2013 at the Arden Hills Army Training site.

In its 2016 state bonding request, the Minnesota Department of Military Affairs says its armory facilities are more than 48 years old on average, with a $107 million backlog of maintenance and renovation needs.

Even so, Gov. Mark Dayton’s 2016 bonding proposal seeks $10.5 million for military projects, including an armory renovation in West St. Paul ($4.5 million), a renovation and expansion of the St. Cloud Readiness Center ($3.5 million), and asset preservation at the Rochester and Willmar readiness centers ($2.5 million combined).

Designed by the Bloomington office of Burns & McDonnell and constructed by St. Paul-based LS Black Constructors, the Ben Franklin Readiness Center offers space for training, maintenance and storage.

The building houses about 25 full-time workers on a day-to-day basis, but up to 400 people will be there on drill weekends. Burr said it consolidates operations that previously took place within multiple buildings.

But the new building isn’t just for National Guard drills. Portions of the building will be open for public functions at times, even as other areas are reserved for everything from training to vehicle maintenance.

Gene Sieve, office manager of Burns & McDonnell’s local office, said the design team worked with the National Guard to optimize workflow and flexibility, taking into consideration the building’s wide range of uses.

Part of the challenge from a layout standpoint was to ensure that a large portion of the building would be secure during the week when only a portion of the building is occupied, Sieve said.

The building’s interior design “physically and visually separates public spaces from organizational use spaces,” including training simulation areas and weapons vaults, according to Burns & McDonnell.

The building was designed to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver specifications. The center is expected to take it easy on energy consumption with help from a geothermal energy system, optimal use of natural light, a highly efficient building envelope and other green building strategies.

Specifically, the National Guard expects the building to have annual energy costs of about 52 cents per square foot — less than half the Minnesota National Guard average of $1.08 per square foot.

LHB, a design firm with offices in Minneapolis, Duluth, Cambridge, and Superior, Wisconsin, provided commissioning services for the project.

Burr said the 834th Aviation Support Battalion had been looking for a new home for years. But the project had to navigate through a long process of approvals and get in line for funding.

The project took about 10 years to become reality from inception to construction.

“It has taken a while, but it’s been worth the wait,” Burr said.

Finance and Commerce | By: Brian Johnson | February 9, 2016

link to full article

+  LHB’s Roosevelt Bridge Rehabilitation ..., February 3, 2016

LHB’s Roosevelt Bridge Rehabilitation Wins ACEC/MN Grand Award

February 3, 2016

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Duluth and Minneapolis, MN, and Superior, WI (February 3, 2016) – LHB’s Roosevelt Bridge Rehabilitation in Austin, MN received an Engineering Excellence Grand Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies of Minnesota (ACEC/MN) and is continuing on to compete at the national competition. This 49th annual competition recognizes engineering achievements that exhibit the highest degree of merit and ingenuity. Entries are judged on the basis of originality and innovation; future value to the engineering profession; social, economic and sustainable design considerations; complexity; and meeting the client’s needs.

The Roosevelt Bridge in the City of Austin was built in 1933 and 1934. Recognizing its historic importance, Mower County, assisted by LHB, the Engineer of Record, and Mead and Hunt, the project’s Historian, achieved a complete rehabilitation of the historic, two span, concrete arch structure which features massive stone headwalls, arch voussior “ring” stones, and stone masonry railings and pilasters. To maintain historic integrity, rehabilitative and replacement work to stone masonry and concrete elements had to be carefully detailed, and replacement materials had to be carefully selected. Current safety standards also required use of a unique structural concrete railing core which was carefully detailed and constructed with stone veneer to ensure it was consistent with the original railing detail and geometrics, further ensuring the Secretary of the Interior’s historic preservation standards were met.

Project partners include Mead & Hunt, MnDOT State Aid and Cultural Resources, Global Specialty, and Mower County.

The American Council of Engineering Companies of Minnesota (ACEC/MN) is the leading business practice and policy advocate for consulting engineering firms in Minnesota. http://acecmn.org/

+  Metropolitan Council Selects LHB to Desi..., January 26, 2016

Metropolitan Council Selects LHB to Design Metro Transit – Heywood II Bus Facility

January 26, 2016

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN, and Superior, WI (January 26, 2016) – Metropolitan Council recently selected LHB to design the Heywood II Bus Operations and Maintenance Facility in Minneapolis, MN. Joining LHB’s team on the project are Maintenance Design Group, RNL, HNTB, Hallberg Engineering, Braun Intertec, Fuel Solutions, and Stanley Consulting.

LHB will lead this highly experienced team to design a new state-of-the-art 350,000 square foot facility at 7th Street N and Lyndale Ave near the existing Metro Transit Headquarters and Heywood Garage in the North Loop District. The new facility will house up to 220 buses, maintenance, fueling, washing, operations, and rooftop parking. The project will focus on function, cost-effectiveness, and aesthetics while achieving a high degree of environmental sustainability. In addition to meeting the State of MN – B3 Sustainability Guidelines and incorporating the Xcel Energy/ CenterPoint Energy EEDA program the Metropolitan Council seeks to pursue a Net Zero Energy ready facility through the design outcomes.

+  Duluth Council OK’s $1.63 M Superi..., January 26, 2016

Duluth Council OK’s $1.63 M Superior Street Re-design Contract

January 26, 2016

As of Monday night, a Duluth-based company is now charged with designing Downtown Superior Street’s new look.

The Duluth City Council on Monday night authorized an agreement of up to $1.63 million with LHB Inc. to engineer the design for Superior Street’s reconstruction.

The project will tackle 11 blocks of underground utilities including sewer mains and steam lines as well as more visible improvements above ground.

Sidewalks, lighting, pavement, traffic signals and more are set to get an overhaul and the corridor will see some modifications for parking and other public amenities.

The city said it’s hiring the firm because of the scope and complexity of the project.

Construction is slated to start in the spring of 2017 and take three years to complete.

Heidi Enninga
Updated: 01/25/2016 9:51 PM
Created: 01/25/2016 9:47 PM

Link to Article

+  Virtual reality brings architect’s..., January 25, 2016

Virtual reality brings architect’s blueprints to life

January 25, 2016

Virtual reality used to be the domain of fantastical video games or frontier-pushing researchers in multimillion dollar labs. But as the technology gets less expensive, VR could transform the architectural world

Construction on the ReMax Results building in Andover won’t begin until spring, but already Douglas J. Boser has walked through rooms and turned on light switches.

Sitting in a comfortable chair in the Minneapolis office of design firm LHB Corp., Boser strapped on an Oculus Rift headset, and toured the two-story office building in living, virtual-reality color.

“This brings a whole other level of depth and detail to anything we’ve been using,” said Boser, a St. Cloud-based real estate developer. “You can stand in the middle of the lobby and say, we’ve got to bring that sun shading out 6 inches. And you can literally see the shading change inside the model.”

Virtual reality used to be the domain of fantastical video games or frontier-pushing researchers in multimillion dollar labs. But relatively inexpensive new tools like the Rift and Google Cardboard viewers have made the 3-D experiences more accessible.

LHB has become one of the nation’s first design firms to incorporate virtual reality, or VR, across the sweep of its in-house teams of architects, planners, engineers and landscapers. In the inherently complex world of construction, the firm’s leaders say virtual reality can streamline the cumbersome process of creating plans, reduce costly on-site mistakes and changes, and save money in the process.

“The future is where software and tools are merging,” said LHB senior vice president and architect Mike Fischer, who predicts an explosion in virtual reality in the field of architecture in the coming years. “The owner can see what they’re getting and the contractor can see what they’re building.”

Virtual reality simulations are a step above animations and fly-throughs now used by some architects. With VR, drawings come to life before workers raise the first hammer.

Users experience the space at eye level — with the flexibility to change the view from that of a 6-foot man to an 8-year old child. Look up, and you might notice that the ceiling lights are hung too low. Look down, and you might rethink that shag carpet. You can test whether the morning sun will cast a glare on your computer screen or whether putting a window in front of that giant evergreen will wreck a million-dollar view of the lake.

Beyond aesthetics, contractors can walk down a flight of stairs, and make sure the headroom is within code. A virtual tour of a manufacturing plant can verify that eye-washing stations conform to OSHA standards.

“With VR, you can inhabit the space in full scale,” said Aaron Westre, a researcher at the University of Minnesota’s Virtual Reality Design Lab, which uses a large-scale motion-capture system in a 5,000-square-foot courtyard. “You get a far more physical sense of what that space is going to be.”

Jim Heilig got a taste of the power of virtual reality as project manager for the Duluth Transit Authority’s $30-million multimodal hub, which is set to open in early February.

“We looked at the flat blueprint and saw our grand stairway, and tried to visualize the ceiling and the lighting and the walls in this area,” he said. “With this tool, you get an idea of the spaciousness much more than you would ever get on the line drawing and even off a model.”

Getting a look at the virtual world helped “work out the kinks” in the real world, Heilig said. After seeing how the natural light changed during the day, his team decided to add lighter wood in some areas. Virtual reality simulations also gave him confidence that people sitting at the information desk would have a clear view of the waiting area and hallways, for security reasons.

“It puts you right in those locations,” Heilig said. “You can see where a person’s going to sit and what they’re going to see when they’re sitting there. A blueprint can give you an idea, but this cements it for you.”

For now, virtual reality technology is being used mostly by large firms and projects with budgets big enough to absorb the costs.

The U’s tracking system, for instance, cost about $250,000, Westre said. And the earliest head-mounted displays when the lab opened four years ago cost about $25,000.

But as the technology becomes available to consumers, the cost is coming down. Google Cardboard viewers, which work with a smartphone, cost less than $20 and turn computer graphics into a 3-D virtual experience. The Oculus Rift, available in retail stores by late March, is a head-mounted system that costs about $600.

It will be years before virtual reality tools will supplant the humble floor plan. But VR can allow designers and clients to design on the fly, easily making changes with the click of a mouse rather than the inefficient back-and-forth volleys and multiple redrafting of plans that happens now.

Virtual reality also has potential to be “the great equalizer,” LHB’s Fischer noted. A middle-school maintenance worker can put on a VR headset and notice design flaws that might go unnoticed by project managers. When debates arise over expensive public projects, elected officials and citizens alike can use a Google Cardboard viewer to step inside of the proposed building ahead of public meetings or voter referendums.

“For many projects, you’ve got clients located all over the place,” said Dan Stine, an LHB architect, who trains building designers around the world on computer-based modeling and virtual reality software. “You have periodic meetings, but when we update the design, they can go to their website and get the latest version. It becomes a single source of truth. That’s the beauty of this.”

The software and technology remain expensive. But builders and developers such as Boser believe investing in VR at the front end, will pay off with greater certainty and cost savings as a project progresses.

“All projects have what we call, ‘conflicts’ — things that don’t conform or need changing,” he said. “We can blow through $100,000 in a major problem in about 5 minutes.

“If all of a sudden you have a change order to add a light fixture, and you only find out after the drywall is up and everything is finished, that’s a costly add. With this? You want a light fixture? It probably won’t cost you as much because it’ll be incorporated into the bid.”

By Jackie Crosby, Star Tribune January 24, 2016 — 4:42pm

Link to Article

+  LHB Expands Services with Location in Ca..., January 20, 2016

LHB Expands Services with Location in Cambridge

January 20, 2016

Duluth, Minneapolis, and Cambridge, MN, and Superior, WI (January 20, 2016) – LHB is pleased to announce the transition of survey staff from APA Consulting Engineers and Surveyors to LHB’s new office in Cambridge, MN. The new staff are located in APA’s former office at 200 3rd Avenue Northeast, Suite 100, Cambridge, MN 55008.

“The opening of a Cambridge office allows us to better serve our clients in Central and Southern Minnesota, including the Twin Cities metro area. The addition of surveying staff there lets us quickly react to our clients’ needs,” said Bill Bennett, LHB’s Chief Executive Officer.

The Cambridge location will initially consist of the following employees transitioning from APA to LHB:

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Kyle Roddy is an LHB Survey Lead. Kyle brings 17 years of surveying experience consisting of ALTA/ACSM Land Title Surveys, Boundary and Topographic Surveys, Construction Staking, FEMA Floodplain Surveys, final plats, and easement surveys. He has been a licensed Professional Land Surveyor since 2003 in Minnesota, and since 2008 in Wisconsin. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota.

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Jon Boklep is a Senior Survey Crew Chief. Jon has over 20 years of experience in the field; primarily in the areas of boundary, topographic, and ALTA/ACSM Land Title surveys, as well as construction staking and FEMA flood plain surveys. He has a good working knowledge of the use of a Trimble R10 GPS system and Trimble TSC3 data collector.

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Ernie Overby is an Intermediate Survey Technician. Prior to transitioning, Ernie was an Architectural Drafter for the past seven years. He is knowledgeable in CAD, and survey standards and methods. He specializes in drafting certificates of survey, preliminary and final plats, and ALTA/ACSM Land Title surveys.

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Wes Pallo is a Field Survey Technician. Wes brings a broad range of field surveying knowledge to LHB’s Survey Group. He has experience in topographic surveys, ALTA surveys, and construction staking.

+  Vegetables shine at the new Co-op Creame..., January 20, 2016

Vegetables shine at the new Co-op Creamery

January 20, 2016

The Seward Co-op branches out and blossoms as it broadens the notion of sustainability.

 

When the Seward Co-op entered the restaurant business last year, the store’s leadership wisely entrusted their high-profile project to a pair of well-chosen recruits: general manager Chad Snelson, and chef Lucas Almendinger.

I’d follow these two anywhere. Snelson was one of the masterminds behind Fika, the American Swedish Institute’s genre-bending cafe, and Almendinger, a Tilia vet, has more than proved his cooking chops by launching the Third Bird and the former Union Fish Market.

The duo has not disappointed, forging a restaurant that adheres to the co-op’s sustainability principles — right down to its livable-wages policy, which eliminates tipping — while simultaneously nudging the neighborhood cafe model into exciting new directions.

The Co-op Creamery gets its name from its address, a sturdy redbrick reminder of the 1920s that was originally home to a busy dairy production plant. Seward purchased the building to expand its baking, deli and sausage-making production facilities, and open a restaurant.

Since the doors opened in mid-August, it’s been fascinating to watch the menu evolve (prices have fallen in the evening, for example), as Almendinger both gauges his audience and immerses himself in the co-op’s remarkable, decades-in-the-making supply chain infrastructure.

This place is ground zero in the local-seasonal movement. Two words of advice: Steer clear of the seitan-on-a-steam-table caricature of a restaurant operated by a natural foods co-op. And whatever you do, don’t hang the tired, narrow, ill-defined label of “vegetarian restaurant” on Co-op Creamery.

Almendinger is certainly in favor of a terminology switch-up.

“You do that, and everyone is a lot more receptive,” he said. “If I tell cooks that we’re going to “Cook vegetarian,” I get an eye roll. But if I say, ‘We’re going to cook with vegetables,’ I get a ‘Yes!’ ”

For inspiration, he’s become a disciple of chef Amanda Cohen of New York City’s acclaimed, vegetable-focused Dirt Candy restaurant.

“You can do so much more with a carrot than a rib-eye,” he said. “You lose that mind-set that meat has to be at the center, and it changes the way you approach flavor. We’re here to make vegetables shine, and use meat to support that.”

Case in point: thick, cut-like-a-porterhouse cauliflower, caramelized to sweetness on the stove, slow-roasted to coax out a nearly fork-tender texture and glazed with a vegan approximation of a spicy, funky XO sauce. For contrast, it’s paired with a cauliflower purée and shaved raw cauliflower, with bright lime and crunchy peanut flourishes, a combination that’s as substantial — and as satisfying — as a well-grilled New York strip.

I’ll go into mourning when Brussels sprouts season comes to an end, because Almendinger and his crew — led by sous chefs Lindsay Owens and Cara Grand — are transforming thumbnail-sized versions by deep-frying them in canola oil to gentle crispiness and unlocking their inherent nuttiness. From there, magic happens.

Hot out of the fryer, they’re tossed in peanut butter, the heat melting it and evenly spreading it. From there, more heat — this time, spice-fueled — with a rambunctious house- fermented sambal, with golden raisins sneaking in a counterbalancing sweetness. The menu labels them “snacks,” but such a toss-off doesn’t do them justice.

The daytime menu practically reads as the kitchen’s egg-worshiping manifesto. It’s easy to see why, given the general gorgeousness of the beauties coming from Dancing Hen Farm in Weyerhaeuser, Wis.

They poach like a dream, with vivid sunburst-yellow yolks and creamy whites. They’re a key player in three appealing day-starters: a rice bowl (seasoned with a rich, gluten-free soy sauce) topped with pungent kimchi and tender chicken, a roasted butternut squash filled with wild rice and crunchy toasted pumpkin seeds, and a colorful, rib-sticking plate of biscuits and chorizo gravy.

They’re also a treat to see sunny side up, crowning a gotta-have grilled Cheddar cheese sandwich on dark rye, or as part of a first-rate, well-garnished chilaquiles. They make for superb scrambles (get it with the insanely good brined lamb shoulder) and even better omelets, each airy bite redolent of butter, just as it should be.

Or pretend you’re in a diner and order two of them, any style, with crisp bacon (or a decent house-made vegan sausage), ultra-crisp hash browns and buttery toast.

For vegans, there’s a credible egg salad (made with tofu) and a flavorful barbecue that enlists shredded jackfruit for pork. My favorite soup of the moment is the essence of winter squash, so lusciously velvety it is surely infused with cream. But it’s not.

Vegetarian dishes also impress. All dinners should commence with creamy barley dressed with crisped sage and a nose-tickling hint of truffle. If there’s a savory crêpe on the menu, order it. Oh, and don’t miss the fritters, their delicate, golden pastry surrounding some puréed (and richly seasoned) vegetable of the moment.

Meat, fish and poultry eaters also have a place at the table. At lunch, Almendinger crafts a humdinger of a burger, its overt Germanic overtones (caraway-flecked sauerkraut, a boldly rye bun) a welcome foil to the double-patty American cheeseburgers that are currently all the rage. The aforementioned lamb is the backbone of a wildly decadent Reuben.

At dinner, the co-op’s excellent house-made sausages find their way onto a well-garnished snack plate. Lake Superior-caught whitefish, a mellow local treasure that unfortunately gets too little play on Twin Cities menus, has disappeared for the season. That makes dinner’s best dish a juicy bone-in pork loin, deftly finished with bright pineapple-tomatillo-black mole accents that more than pull the chill off a frigid winter’s night.

Oh, and sweetbreads. Animal offal (skillfully prepared, by the way) are about the last item you’d expect to find at a vegetable-centric restaurant, but not here. For Almendinger, it’s a sustainability issue, and finding a place for frequently discarded animal parts is as important as making full use of vegetable scraps.

The straightforward bakery case goodies — cupcakes, cookies, éclairs — more than satisfy (as do the a.m. bagels), and pastry chef Laura LaVille’s inventive, wonderfully not-too-sweet desserts show plenty of promise.

Pared-down setting

The L-shaped, all-white interior quietly recalls the pristine cleanliness of the building’s original use as a dairy, and enormous windows flood the inherently cheery space with sunlight.

It’s an appealing effort from LHB, the Minneapolis architectural firm, with a graphics assist from Replace, the Minneapolis branding firm. One (un-green, admittedly) quibble, given the recent spate of subzero temperatures: Would it kill someone to please turn up the heat?

A word on prices. Quickly peruse the menu, and a slight case of sticker shock is a reasonable outcome.

But do the math. Higher prices support the operation’s equitable salary structure, so after mentally subtracting the 15 to 25 percent tip that you won’t be leaving — remember, Co-op Creamery is a gratuity-free zone — shelling out $14 for a burger seems downright reasonable.

Factor in Almendinger’s detail-driven handiwork, and the word “value” applies. It’s a model that more restaurants should emulate.

+  LHB 2015 Food Drive: Minnesota Consultin..., January 8, 2016

LHB 2015 Food Drive: Minnesota Consulting Firms Unite to Benefit Local Communities

January 8, 2016

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN, and Superior, WI (January 8, 2016) – LHB was part of a group of 11 Minnesota engineering and environmental consulting firms who used the spirit of competition to fuel their fourth annual food drive that yielded nearly $220,000 and almost four tons of food and clothing for local food shelves and charities.

“LHB is proud to participate in the Food Drive Challenge. With our industry friends, LHB’s combined corporation and staff donations will benefit Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank serving the Twin Ports area and Second Harvest Heartland serving the Twin Cities,” noted LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, PE.

Donations to food shelves and charities statewide included: 360 Communities (Burnsville), Bloomington Food Shelf, Buffalo Food Shelf, Catholic Charities (St. Cloud), Channel One Food Shelf (Rochester), Christian Cupboard Emergency Food Shelf (Woodbury), Eagan Food Shelf, Emergency Food Network, Feed My Starving Children, Helping Hands Food Shelf (Delano), Hibbing Food Shelf, Hunger Solutions Minnesota, ICA Food Shelf (Minnetonka), Keystone Community Services, Mankato Echo Food Shelf, Minnesota FoodShare, Neighborhood House Food Shelf, Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank (Duluth location serving Northeastern MN and Northwestern WI), PROP (People Reaching out to Other People), Salvation Army Martin County Food Shelf, Second Harvest Heartland (St. Paul and Golden Valley locations serving 59 counties in MN and western WI) , Sharing and Caring Hands, Sleepy Eye Area Food Shelf, The Food Group, The Pet Project, United Way, and VEAP (Volunteers Enlisted to Assist People).

Link to WDIO Article: http://www.wdio.com/article/stories/s3705926.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

+  LHB Announces Licensure and New Staff, December 9, 2015

LHB Announces Licensure and New Staff

December 9, 2015

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Duluth and Minneapolis, MN; and Superior, WI (December 9, 2015) – Becky Alexander received her Professional Architect license from the State of Minnesota. Becky holds three degrees: a Master of Architecture and a Master of Science in Architecture – Sustainable Design from the University of Minnesota, and a Bachelor of Arts from Carleton College. Becky joined LHB in 2012 and is based in the Minneapolis office, where she engages in a combination of sustainable building research and architectural design. Becky was recently named to Midwest Energy News’ “40 Under 40” List and is a member of the Minneapolis Living Building Challenge Collaborative.

 

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees:

 

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Benjamin Kobold joins the Minneapolis Office as a Mechanical Designer. Benjamin recently graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. Benjamin is also an Eagle Scout with Boy Scouts of America and was involved with the national organization for 12 years.

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Julie Samuelson joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative Assistant. Julie has over 23 years of experience in administrative positions and has her notary commission. She is a member of the Minnesota National Guard Enlisted Association, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Criminology from the University of Minnesota Duluth.

+  LHB Announces New Shareholders, December 3, 2015

LHB Announces New Shareholders

December 3, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (December 3, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce that Aaron Kelly, Sara G. Phillips, and Philip Waugh have been elected as LHB Shareholders.

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Aaron Kelly, AIA, LEED AP joined LHB in early 2013 with a diverse portfolio of architecture and planning project experience across 14 states, Canada, and the United Arab Emirates. He leads LHB’s Government Focus with a background in public projects serving clients in transit, community, and public agencies. Civic improvement and sustainable design are at the heart of Aaron’s practice, which most recently includes the Duluth Transit Authority Multimodal Facility, Metro Transit Master Contract for Construction Support, Essentia Health Regional Wellness Center, and Giants Ridge Event Center.

Aaron is a graduate of North Dakota State University’s Bachelor of Architecture program and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Design. He is his alma mater’s Past-Chair of the Alumni Advisory Board and the President-Elect for the AIA Northern Minnesota Chapter. His accomplishments in the design of public transportation projects include the 2010 AIA Los Angeles – Next LA Design Citation Award, selection for the Mass Transit Magazine – Top 40 Under 40 List in 2012, and the 2013 ENR California Transit Award of Merit. He has served on the Sustainability Committee and Maintenance Committee of the American Public Transportation Association and is an active member of the Minnesota Public Transportation Association.

 

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Sara G. Phillips, AIA, LEED AP has been an architect with LHB for the past nine years. Her devotion to LHB’s high performance design initiatives, quality project delivery, and client satisfaction is evident in all of her projects, from campus master plans to delivering construction administration services. Sara’s most recent notable projects include the Ridgewater College Technical Instruction and Student Services Renovation, Seward Community Co-op Friendship Store, and Chatfield Center for the Arts.

Sara graduated from Iowa State University with a Bachelor of Architecture degree. She became a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional in 2006 and has continued her membership with the U.S. Green Building Council. Sara is also a member of the American Institute of Architects, and will be the 2016 Architect in the Schools Committee Chair for AIA Minnesota. A past winner of the Designing Tomorrow’s Architect Essay Competition, Sara is passionate about mentoring less experienced staff on their path towards licensure.

 

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Philip Waugh, Associate AIA, LEEP AP joined LHB in 2013 with an extensive portfolio of Historic Preservation project experience. Philip co-leads our Performance Services Group and is well versed in building investigation, facility assessment, material research, and historic construction methods.  Philip provides LHB’s clients with passion for and professional expertise in preserving historic structures. Philip’s notable projects include the Historic Duluth Armory Restoration, Split Rock Lighthouse Humidity Study, and the H. Alden Smith House Reuse Study.

Philip holds his Master of Science degree in Historic Preservation from the University of Oregon, and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Skidmore College. Philip meets the Secretary of the Interior’s Professional Qualification Standards for Architectural History, and is a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional through the U.S. Green Building Council. He is an Adjunct Instructor at the University of Minnesota School of Architecture College of Design and an Associate Member of the American Institute of Architects Minnesota.

+  Tool tracks energy performance in state..., November 27, 2015

Tool tracks energy performance in state’s public buildings

November 27, 2015

Minnesota’s “B3” sustainable building program is intended to make the state’s building stock greener and more energy efficient, but it’s not just about constructing to a certain standard and then moving on to the next project.

Tracking performance in Minnesota’s new and existing public buildings is a big part of the program’s mission, which is where the second “B” in its name — “Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond” – comes in.

Richard Graves, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Sustainable Building Research program, said at a recent AIA Minnesota event in Minneapolis that benchmarking was “an integral part” of B3 “from day one.”

“It’s not just about making promises that the buildings are going to perform,” Graves said. “We are going to design these things, make predictive models on how they are going to perform, and [go back] after they are completed to see how they are doing so that we can all learn and get better.”

A new tool on the B3 website (mn.b3benchmarking.com) is part of that effort. More than 8,000 buildings are included in the database, which shows how buildings are performing. They can be sorted in multiple ways.

For example, energy use in a building is typically measured in thousands of BTU per square foot per year, or kBTU/ft2/yr.

According to the B3 benchmarking database, the Bielenberg Sports Center in Woodbury is consuming 77.86 kBTU per square foot per year, which is far better than the minimum requirements under the building code.

Graves said it’s one of the largest databases of its kind in the world.

Rick Carter, senior vice president in the Minneapolis office of design and engineering firm LHB, said website users can even create their own energy consumption target for a building.

“I equate this to having a construction cost budget,” Carter said at the AIA Minnesota event. “We all start with a construction costs budget; now we are starting with an energy budget.”

LHB, the U of M’s Center for Sustainable Building Research and the Weidt Group in Minnetonka collaborated on the B3 program.

Becky Alexander, a designer and associate with LHB, pointed to the Silver Creek Corner supportive housing project in Rochester as an example of why benchmarking is important.

Completed in December 2011, Silver Creek provides support services and 40 housing units for people who have struggled with addiction and homelessness. LHB designed it to meet state standards for efficiency and performance.

But a couple of years after it opened, the project team learned that the building was consuming more energy than expected. Steam consumption was twice as high as predicted.

As it turns out, the building was being used in ways that the designers didn’t foresee.

For example, each resident’s room had a TV and refrigerator, so the plug loads were greater than anticipated, Alexander said.

And besides cooking for residents, the kitchen staff was preparing food for the local Meals on Wheels program, which resulted in higher propane and steam use.

“They are cooking twice as many meals as they expected they would be,” Alexander said.

But open windows were the biggest culprit. Windows were being opened year-around because people were smoking indoors, “so there are big holes in the envelope on the hottest and coldest days of the year,” Alexander said.

With that type of information, the design team came up with ways improve performance by using everything from fan controls to changes in the ventilation system, Alexander said.

LHB has since done a couple of projects for similar clients and has applied those lessons, Carter said.

“We have been able to know those things in advance and deal with them very cost effectively upfront,” he said, though he cautioned that it’s much more expensive to make changes in a completed building.

According to its website, Minnesota’s B3 guidelines help design teams meet sustainability goals related to site, energy, indoor environment, materials and waste. All projects that receive state bonding money are required to follow the guidelines.

Recent examples include the new $89.5 million Senate Office Building, which is expected to open in December, the $307 million State Capitol renovation, and the University of Minnesota’s new $84.5 million Physics and Nanotechnology Building.

B3 benchmarking’s history dates to 2001, when state lawmakers enacted legislation requiring the state to track the performance of all public buildings in Minnesota for a period of 12 months.

The benchmarking application, developed by the Weidt Group, is “one of the most robust tools for tracking and managing energy use in public buildings,” according to the B3 Benchmarking website.

Buildings in the database include state, city, county and education facilities. Roughly $23 million in potential energy savings have been identified in 1,500 of those buildings, according to the website.

Finance & Commerce – By: Brian Johnson November 25, 2015 10:47 am

Link to online article

+  LHB’s Jim Tiggelaar to Speak at AP..., November 13, 2015

LHB’s Jim Tiggelaar to Speak at APWA-MN Conference

November 13, 2015

LHB’s Jim Tiggelaar to Speak at APWA-MN Conference

 

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Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (November 13, 2015) – LHB’s Jim Tiggelaar will speak at the American Public Works Association Minnesota Chapter (APWA-MN) Fall Conference in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on November 19th at 1:00 p.m., at the Earle Brown Heritage Center. Jim will present on the Promenade of Wayzata and how the project overcame extreme challenges to transform a declining mall into a dense mixed-use development mimicking native wetland conditions.

LHB worked with the Wayzata Bay Redevelopment Company to plan a unique senior housing community that extends the traditional forms of downtown Wayzata across the site. LHB designed storm water management strategies that accompany several other sustainable and energy efficient efforts included in the project. Storm water systems replicate runoff conditions to Lake Minnetonka that existed in the site’s native condition.

APWA-MN’s membership includes over 900 public works professionals throughout the State of Minnesota. Members represent both the public and private industries who collectively work together to advance the public works profession. Their mission is to advance the theory and practice of the design, construction, maintenance, administration, and operation of public works facilities and services. For more information: http://www.apwa-mn.org/events-education/Fall-Conference/2015

Jim Tiggelaar, PE, CCS, LEED AP, is a Civil Project Manager for the Public Works Group involved in a variety of building site work and municipal engineering projects. Jim’s extensive experience includes pre-design investigations, feasibility and master planning studies, cost estimating, and compilation of construction plans and specifications. He has designed numerous sites, roadways, and sewer, storm and water main systems for several high profile building and infrastructure projects in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

+  Duluth design firm offers new virtual re..., November 11, 2015

Duluth design firm offers new virtual reality experience

November 11, 2015

Imagine getting to go inside a new building or facility before ground has even been broken.

That’s what one company has just started doing for their clients thanks to new virtual technology.

“So the 2-D drawings that the contractor is looking at in the field is produced from this 3-D model,” said Dan Stine, LHB’s BIM Administrator.

Building Information Modeling, or BIM, allows architects to see their designs in 3-D and get better insight into how their designs will function in the real world.

LHB, a multi-disciplinary architecture, engineering and planning firm with offices in Duluth and Superior, has been using this technology for about 15 years.

Now they’re introducing even more advanced technology.

“The newest opportunity that we are taking advantage of here is the virtual reality aspect. This is a virtual tour of a 3-D model. It has gravity and physics involved,” said Stine.

Whether it is through the Oculus Rift, or Google Cardboard. This new technology gives LHB’s clients a virtual experience.

“With the Oculus and the Google Cardboard, the user is able to control what they are looking at. You’ve got a little bit more video game experience when you are in the model. When people have their own control of where they’re going, within that model, they can look and get there questions answered really quickly,” said Aaron Kelly, LHB’s Architectural Project Manager.

The virtual technology is fairly new, with LHB only using it a handful of times on projects including the DTA Multimodal Transportation Center.

Architects are able to pay more attention to the smaller details, and virtual tour goers are left amazed.

“Usually wow, people have seen this on tv but to actually experience this first hand is pretty exciting,” said Stine.

Now, LHB is hoping even more clients can experience a building before it’s even built.

The DTA Multimodal Transportation Center, one of the facilities for which LHB has created a virtual reality experience, is expected to open in January.

 

Duluth, MN(NNCNow.com)–by Mackenzie Scott | November 10. 2015 7:42 PM CST

link to online article

 

+  LHB Creates Virtual Reality (VR) Experie..., November 10, 2015

LHB Creates Virtual Reality (VR) Experiences in Designs

November 10, 2015

LHB is creating virtual reality (VR) experiences for architectural, engineering, and planning designs. Virtual reality is primarily known for its applications in gaming and military fields. LHB is using VR as a method to further engage clients in the design process, and to manage project budgets by improving plans prior to construction. Clients are immersed into their spaces by viewing LHB’s designs with the firm’s Oculus Rift VR headsets. LHB also uses rendered stereo panoramas to create VR experiences that can be viewed on a computer, phone, or Google Cardboard VR viewing tool.

 

“VR allows our clients to experience their projects through a simulated physical presence in their space,” noted LHB Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett. “Unlike a two-dimensional drawing or three-dimensional model, VR allows our clients to ‘feel’ what the space will be like.”

 

The company will work with clients to determine when a project, or parts of a project should be rendered into a VR experience. “We know that some projects will benefit from VR more than others,” commented Bennett. “For example, clients are seeing that VR may be helpful in attracting investors for their development. Other applications might be for public clients to showcase a new facility to attract voter support, or ensure that the design is meeting everyone’s expectations.”

Watch this KBJR6 Interview: http://www.northlandsnewscenter.com/news/local/Duluth-design-firm-offers-new-virtual-reality-experience-345285342.html

To learn more about LHB’s VR capabilities, visit: http://www.lhbcorp.com/vr/

 

Virtual Reality Experience

LHB’s BIM Administrator, Dan Stine, demonstrates the DTA Multimodal virtual reality (VR) experience.

For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

 

+  LHB New Hires and Recognitions, November 6, 2015

LHB New Hires and Recognitions

November 6, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (November 6, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees and current employee recognitions to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI offices:

 

Recognitions

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Jason Wedel was recently appointed to the Board of the Sensible Land Use Coalition (SLUC). Jason, a licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota and North Dakota, is the Municipal Engineering Lead for the Public Works and Structures Group at LHB. Jason has also served as the City Engineer for a number of communities including Savage, Lino Lakes and Long Lake, Minnesota as well as working in land development for a national home builder.

The Sensible Land Use Coalition, a 35-year-old non-profit organization is the only organization of its kind in the region that brings together stakeholders from all facets of development to learn and discuss land use issues, and build relationships that work toward a successful outcome. For more information: http://www.sensibleland.org/

New Hires

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Kyle Michela joins the Duluth office as an Accountant working with the Finance Group. Kyle graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Bachelor of Arts degree in Accounting. In addition to having 5 years of experience in finance, Kyle is certified in 2013 COSO Framework and Excel III.

 

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Nathan Wriedt joins the Minneapolis Office as an Electrical Project Manager. A licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota and Iowa, Nathan has over 13 years of electrical engineering experience designing lighting, load calculation, power systems, integrated technology systems (telecommunications, security/mass notification systems, and audio visual systems), fire and emergency communication systems, and lightning protection. Nathan has designed electrical and special systems across the country for a variety of markets including aviation, commercial, healthcare, government, and education. Nathan is a U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP), and Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). Nathan is a member of North Central Electrical League (NCEL), Minnesota State Chief Engineers Guild (MnCEG), and a graduate of South Dakota State University.

+  Kirby’s New Look, October 21, 2015

Kirby’s New Look

October 21, 2015

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University of Minnesota Duluth students and staff gathered on Tuesday to celebrate newly finished renovations at Kirby Student Center.

The ribbon-cutting marked the official completion of the second phase of renovations at the nearly-60-year-old gathering place for UMD students. The latest work added office and meeting space to the center, following the updating and expansion of the lounge area in 2013.

The work was funded by Student Service Fees allocated in support of the renovations, UMD reported.

Planning started three years ago as it became clear that the facility needed upgrades in technology, efficiency and other areas. The footprint of the building had to stay the same, so architects designed the new interior spaces to maximize room for students. UMD reported that the two phases of the renovation have added 4,300 square feet of space open for all students to use.

“I feel like we have a lot more opportunities to connect with students,” Nathan Ernst, president of the UMD Student Association, said in a news release. “It’s such a welcome and open space.”

Designers used a UMD-appropriate maroon-and-gold color scheme throughout the renovated spaces.

+  LHB New Hires and Recognitions, October 19, 2015

LHB New Hires and Recognitions

October 19, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (October 19, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new and recognized employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

New Hires
 
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Keenan Hayes joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative College Intern. Keenan is pursuing his Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Sustainability at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He is also in the process of earning his Geographical Information Systems (GIS) certificate through UMD’s Geography Department.

Recognitions
 
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Becky Alexander, was named to Midwest Energy News’ 2015 40 Under 40 List. The award program highlights emerging leaders throughout the region and their work to accelerate America’s transition to a clean energy economy. Becky is a researcher and designer at LHB where she provides a combination of sustainable building research and architectural design services. Her sustainable building research involves collecting, analyzing, visualizing, and synthesizing data for building, organization, and city-wide scales. Becky holds a Master of Architecture Degree and a Master of Science in Architecture, Sustainable Design Degree from the University of Minnesota, and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Carleton College.

Midwest Energy News is a non-profit news site dedicated to keeping stakeholders, policymakers, and citizens informed of the important changes taking place as the Midwest shifts from fossil fuels to a clean energy system. For more information see: http://midwestenergynews.com/4040day1/ .

+  Sustainable energy firm remakes the Jemn..., October 16, 2015

Sustainable energy firm remakes the Jemne Building, an art-deco gem, in St. Paul

October 16, 2015

The Jemne Building, a snug little art deco structure in downtown St. Paul, has had a variety of identities since it was built by the Women’s City Club in 1931.

It’s been a focal point for St. Paul’s female elite, an art museum and the office of an architecture firm.

Now, work is underway for its latest and perhaps most fitting incarnation: Headquarters for District Energy St. Paul and its subsidiary, Ever-Green Energy.

The entities are leaders in the sustainable energy movement and they have been seeking a permanent new home that would reflect their growing national reputation.

District Energy purchased the Jemne, 305 St. Peter St., in March for $1.7 million. This month, it is carrying out a $1.2 million retrofitting effort led by the Minneapolis office of Duluth-based LHB Architects and RJM Construction.

The commitment of buying its own office building was a big step for nonprofit District Energy, which in recent years has been working out of offices in the high-rise Landmark Towers just down the block.

As the builder and operator of St. Paul’s downtown district heating and cooling system, it saw a rare opportunity in the Jemne Building, which was already on its system and, since 1998, had housed the office of Wold Architects and Engineers.

“Not only does the purchase make sense in a purely real estate investment way — with its great location and Mississippi River views along a quickly redeveloping stretch of Kellogg Boulevard — but it really fits who we are as an organization,” Nina Axelson, a spokeswoman for District Energy, said. “What we’re doing here is taking an old building and giving it a new life as a hallmark to energy efficiency and education about sustainable energy use. In that way, it’s very fitting to what we’re all about.”

District Energy St. Paul was a pioneer in sustainable energy, established by Mayor George Latimer in 1983 as a response to the 1970s energy crisis. Sixty percent of the heating it provides to downtown buildings is derived from renewable sources.

In 1998, it launched Ever-Green, a for-profit subsidiary dedicated to expanding the St. Paul model to other places through consulting and management services. It’s that growing part of the organization that prompted the search for a permanent home for around 35 office employees, Axelson said.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982, the Jemne Building’s irregular, zigzagging shape; smooth, curving facade of Mankato Kasota limestone, meticulously executed terrazzo floor patterns and elements of dark polished granite designed by the husband-and-wife team of Magnus and Elsa Jemne all powerfully evoke the early-1930s heyday of art deco.

But District Energy President and CEO Ken Smith envisions the Jemne as a modern showcase for advanced energy technologies. This, he reasoned, could be accomplished not only by retrofitting the building with latest efficiency techniques, but also by re-purposing one of its most interesting features, a large ground-floor auditorium, as an education and training hub for energy sustainability.

The room, which can seat 120, offers some of the clearest interior examples of the Jemnes’ “Moderne” style. Its 30-foot ceiling is adorned with a striking light fixture by Minneapolis interior designer Frank Post. Its stage is framed by streamlined columns.

But overall, the current work is not a full-blown historical restoration but more of a “surgical renovation,” LHB architect R. Bruce Cornwall said during a tour of the building this week.

“There are parts of the building we’re choosing not to restore, either because they are too far gone or the return value on the investment makes it not worthwhile,” he said. “The wooden floors are a good example of what we are doing. In some cases, such as in the auditorium, we discovered when we removed some of the newer flooring that original wood beneath was in really good shape and could be refinished.”

Don Jacobson is a freelance writer based in St. Paul. He is the former editor of the Minneapolis/St. Paul Real Estate Journal.

Link to online article


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With some green updates, it will be the new home of District Energy.

 

 

+  LHB’s Minneapolis Office is Third ..., October 14, 2015

LHB’s Minneapolis Office is Third LEED-CI Platinum Certified Project in MN

October 14, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (October 14, 2015) – LHB’s Minneapolis Office was recently awarded LEED® Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). This is the third LEED-Commercial Interiors (CI) Platinum certified project in Minnesota.

LHB’s Minneapolis Office located inside the Loose Wiles Building at 701 Washington Avenue North was designed by LHB with the goal of reaching LEED Platinum Certification. Recently, the goal was met with the USGBC certifying the 9,500-square-foot commercial office space with the highest level of LEED certification attainable.

LHB designed a playful space with pops of color while incorporating high performance sustainable strategies. Designed to feature natural daylighting and views to the outdoors from all seated spaces, LHB incorporated several additional high performance elements including 35% water use reduction, use of high-recycled content, regional and low-VOC materials, sustainable harvest-certified wood, and the use of 100% LED light fixtures with daylight or occupancy controls.

 

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+  LHB Bridge Rehabilitation Project Receiv..., October 6, 2015

LHB Bridge Rehabilitation Project Receives Impact Award from Preservation Alliance of Minnesota

October 6, 2015

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Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (October 6, 2015) – The Mower County Roosevelt Bridge Rehabilitation project designed by LHB was selected to receive the Impact Award by the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM). LHB and other team members will accept this award at PAM’s Preservation Alliance Benefit Gala on October 8, 2015 in St. Paul, MN. The Impact Award recognizes projects for their undeniable impact, quality, and vision in the field of preservation.

Wishing to preserve a historic structure in the City of Austin, MN, Mower County began the quest to rehabilitate the Roosevelt Bridge in 2010. The rehabilitation project was broken into two phases with a combined construction cost in excess of $3,000,000. LHB was the Engineer of Record and worked with Mead and Hunt as the Historian to complete the rehabilitation in the spring of 2014.

The Preservation Alliance of Minnesota (PAM) believes that preserving old buildings and sites is a beautiful, economically sound, and sustainable way to improve our communities and make the most of unique assets that are in our communities. Through their programs, PAM unites people, businesses, and neighborhoods, and decisions-makers to enhance communities by protecting and promoting old buildings and sites. For more information about this year’s awards and PAM visit http://www.mnpreservation.org/minnesota-preservation-award-winners/.

+  School District of Superior Referendum V..., October 1, 2015

School District of Superior Referendum Vision and Numbers

October 1, 2015

Vision for Superior High School

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Vision for Cooper Elementary School

 

Vision Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax impact

 

+  Multiple LHB Grocery Co-op Projects Open..., September 30, 2015

Multiple LHB Grocery Co-op Projects Opening This Fall

September 30, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (September 30, 2015) – Several grocery cooperative projects designed by LHB are opening within the next few months. Many of the cooperatives were formed by community members to develop economic opportunities, improve access to healthy local produce, and strengthen their surrounding neighborhoods.

Mississippi Market Natural Foods Co-op East 7th, St. Paul
Mississippi Market, a consumer-owned natural foods co-op store, recently opened its third location in St. Paul’s East Side. The 26,000 square foot building features a wide selection of local and organic foods, a full-service meat and seafood counter, deli with juice bar, cheese island, and pizza bar. The mezzanine contains offices, open work space, and an employee break room all with views across the retail floor below.

LHB designed an energetic and well day-lit retail environment that reinforces connections to the historic Dayton’s Bluff neighborhood of St. Paul through an abundance of windows in nearly all spaces of the building. The project strived to incorporate a broad spectrum of environmentally appropriate and energy efficient strategies including storm water management, reduced interior and exterior water use and a healthy indoor environment.

Seward Community Co-op Franklin Creamery Building and Friendship Store, Minneapolis
Built in 1920, the Seward Franklin Creamery Building was first home to a co-op that processed and delivered dairy products. Today this historic building has transformed back to its original purpose of being a food production facility and will provide the Seward Community Co-op space to expand their bakery and meat production capabilities.

LHB designed the two-phase renovation project of the creamery building. The project included an elevator addition to access the second floor office space, and created a first floor café and production kitchen. LHB also assisted with site work improvements and loading dock revisions. The café opened to the public in mid-August, and soon after, the Creamery launched food production and delivery to the Co-Op’s Franklin Avenue retail grocery store.

The Seward Community Co-op’s Friendship Store will be opening this October on the corner of 38th Street and 3rd Avenue South in Minneapolis, MN. This is the second retail grocery location for the 43-year-old community cooperative. The over 20,000 square foot space includes a grocery retail space, support areas including a kitchen, storage space, and receiving area, deli seating area, and a community classroom. The second floor contains offices, open work space, and an employee break room which includes access to a rooftop deck.

Whole Foods Co-op Denfeld, Duluth
LHB designed a second location for Whole Foods Co-op in Duluth’s Denfeld neighborhood. The 14,500 square foot retail grocery space features a take-out seating area, cooking classroom, deli, back store preparation area, storage space, offices, and additional refrigeration space. The project was designed with the goal of attaining the US Green Building Council’s LEED certification. The site also includes parking, service access, and a loading dock. The store is anticipated to open in the spring of 2016.

Mississippi_Market_0018_medium

+  LHB’s Bergman and Fournier Published i..., September 10, 2015

LHB’s Bergman and Fournier Published in American Society of Civil Engineers’ Journal

September 10, 2015

JBB_Jay_B_Bergman_byJeffFrey_PRMAF_Matt_Fournier_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (September 9, 2015) – LHB’s Jay Bergman and Matthew Fournier presented at the American Society of Civil Engineers’ (ASCE) 16th International Conference on Cold Regions Engineering in Salt Lake City, UT with Robert J. Schoneberger, of United Piping Inc. Their presentation focused on their recently published abstract, “Cold Weather Integrity Dig on a Scenic River, Northern Michigan,” in the ASCE Cold Regions Engineering 2015 Journal. For more information, see http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/9780784479315.049

LHB recently completed engineering and survey work for a pipeline integrity dig project in the upper Midwest during the winter of 2013 when temperatures ranged from -18 to 42 degrees Fahrenheit. A nine foot deep by 16 foot long excavation was required to expose a section of 30 inch pipeline used for crude oil transportation. Two-thirds of the excavation was into the river, requiring several design considerations and extensive environmental permitting to safeguard the environment. Highlighted in their paper, hydraulic engineering including river modeling of varying storm events with Aquadam design was provided by LHB along with survey and drafting services.

Jay Bergman has over 32 years of design, construction, and management experience in all facets of civil engineering projects.

Matthew provides civil engineering, permitting, and project management support for pipeline integrity projects.

+  Mississippi Market Opens Third Location ..., September 2, 2015

Mississippi Market Opens Third Location in St. Paul

September 2, 2015

Mississippi Market, a consumer-owned natural foods co-op store recently opened its third location in St. Paul’s East Side. The 26,000 square foot building features a wide selection of organic foods, full-service meat counter, cheese island, and pizza bar. LHB, and our consultants, provided architecture, landscape architecture, civil engineering, and structural engineering for the project. The scope of work included site design and design of the core and shell of the building. The intent was to design an energetic and well lit retail environment that reinforced connections to the visually attractive and historic Dayton’s Bluff neighborhood of St. Paul through an abundance of windows in nearly all spaces of the building. The scale, massing, and exterior materials were mindfully considered during the design process to create a neighborhood store that acknowledges the history of the community and works to set a high-quality precedent for future development in the area. LHB’s work, along with a large team of others, helped Mississippi Market realize their vision for a dynamic and high-quality co-op grocery for an area of St. Paul that had been underserved for years.

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+  LHB Employees Presenting at Internationa..., August 27, 2015

LHB Employees Presenting at International and Minnesota Conferences

August 27, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (August 27, 2015) – This September, LHB’s BIM Administrator Daniel Stine will be presenting at the first Asian Revit Technology Conference (RTC), and Historic Preservation Project Manager Philip Waugh will be presenting at Minnesota’s 35th Annual Statewide Historic Preservation Conference.

 

Daniel Stine will speak at the first Asian Revit Technology Conference (RTC) in Sentosa, Singapore. An expert in 3D building information modeling (BIM) software and CADD Administrator at LHB, Daniel will be presenting three sessions at this international conference: 1) Interior Design Workflows, 2) Managing Bidding and Construction Phase Revisions with Revit and 3) Mastering Materials; getting what you want from Revit.

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Daniel Stine, CSI, CDT is an author, instructor, BIM manager, and Wisconsin-registered Architect with 23 years of experience. He has spoken at past RTC events since 2011, and was rated one of the Top 10 Speakers at the RTC USA 2012 Conference. Working full-time at LHB, Daniel provides training and support for all disciplines of Autodesk® Revit® (Architecture, Structure and MEP), AutoCAD® Civil 3D®, and AutoCAD. Leveraging his professional experience, Daniel has also written the several textbooks on Revit, AutoCAD, Autodesk, and SketchUp.

 

The first Asian Revit Technology Conference will be held at the Equarius Hotel, Resorts World in Sentosa, Singapore from 10 September – 12 September 2015. The conference provides attendees with the opportunity to learn from some of the world’s top instructors and industry experts, share ideas and insights with an international community of peers, and explore the latest trends and technologies. Revit is a parametric 3D modeling and information management software being widely adopted by AEC firms worldwide. For more information see http://rtcevents.cvent.com/events/rtc-asia-2015/event-summary-1d6d1134472a40159e3e3438cd3d8632.aspx

 

LHB Historic Preservationist and Project Manager, Philip Waugh will present at the 35th Annual Statewide Historic Preservation Conference on “How to Hire the Right Contractor/Consultant for a Project” at the Franciscan Sisters Campus in Little Falls, Minnesota on Friday, September 18th at 8:30 a.m.

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Philip’s presentation is part of a panel discussion that will focus on the how organizations can hire the right personnel for their projects. Attendees will learn helpful tips and tools from the panel on contracting with architects, consultants, general contractors, and tradespeople. Preserve Minnesota, The 35th Annual Statewide Historic Preservation Conference is put on by the Minnesota Historical Society’s (MNHS) State Historic Preservation Office. The MNHS is a dynamic and widely recognized educational organization that is a trusted resource for history. It is highly valued for its historical resources, educational impact, service, advocacy and leadership.

 

For more information: http://www.mnhs.org/shpo/conference/

+  LHB August New Hires and Employee Recogn..., August 25, 2015

LHB August New Hires and Employee Recognitions

August 25, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (August 25, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees and current employee recognitions to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI offices:

 

Recognitions

Jason Wedel has been chosen to participate in the 2015-2016 Twin Cities Leadership Program. Leadership Twin Cities is a nine-month series that informs people about the critical issues facing our community. Its focus is to inform and inspire future leaders – and challenge them to make a difference through personal commitment and involvement. Jason, Principal Engineering Manager at LHB, is a licensed professional engineer and joined LHB in June 2014.

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Anne Porter, Interior Design Project Manager, has been chosen to participate in the 2015-2016 Superior/Douglas County Leadership Program hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Superior. The program aims to identify and cultivate existing and emerging community leaders who want to be involved in improving the community and shaping its future. Participants represent a cross-section of the urban and rural communities of Douglas County. Anne is a Certified Interior Designer that has been with LHB for over 11 years and is based out of the Superior, WI office.

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Mike French has been chosen to participate in the 2015-2016 Leadership Duluth Program hosted by the Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce. Leadership Duluth is designed to identify, orient, develop, and network existing and emerging leaders to take an active role in ensuring the health and prosperity of our area. Mike, a Civil Engineering Lead at LHB, is a licensed professional engineer in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Michigan, and Illinois.

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New Hire’s

Michele Ellis joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative Assistant. Michelle earned her Office Support Specialist Technical Degree from Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College in Superior, WI. She is currently working towards her Administrative Professional Associates Degree.

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Patrick Bowen joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Patrick graduated from the University of Minnesota with his Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, with a concentration in Sociology. Previously, Patrick served as a National Service Member with True North AmeriCorps.

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Shayne Benjamin joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Shayne graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Geography.

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Taylor Schmidt joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative College Intern. Taylor currently attends Lake Superior College and is a member of the Society of Women Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers.

TJS_Taylor_Schmidt_PR

+  LHB Providing Verifications in MN Energy..., August 25, 2015

LHB Providing Verifications in MN Energy Star Challenge

August 25, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (August 21, 2015) – LHB will verify all commercial building certification applications through the City of Minneapolis’ ENERGY STAR Certification grant program funded by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA).

 

LHB engineers will provide the third-party verification of the ENERGY STAR certifications in the City of Minneapolis’s grant program by providing visual inspections of the facilities.  Site visits will verify application information and assess indoor environmental quality such as minimum ventilation rates, occupant comfort and lighting levels. The effort is part of the city’s effort to encourage building owners to decrease energy consumption.

 

LHB continues to assist the City of Minneapolis and commercial building owners on a multitude of sustainability and performance projects.

+  LHB Recognized by Architectural Record a..., July 30, 2015

LHB Recognized by Architectural Record and The Zweig Group

July 30, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN, and Superior, WI (July 30, 2015) – LHB was ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural firms in the nation by Architectural Record and as a 2015 Hot Firm by Zweig Group.

LHB placed No. 215 on Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List and No. 83 on The Zweig Group Hot Firm List. This is LHB’s fourth time on the Top 300 list, and the third time on the Hot Firm List.

LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett noted, “We were able to weather the recession due to long term relationships with great clients and our talented staff. Our success since the recession continues to be attributed to these two factors.”

Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List ranks companies by revenue (in millions of dollars) for architectural services performed in 2014. For more information: http://archrecord.construction.com/practice/top300/2015/top300-architecture-firms-1.asp

In an industry comprised of over 100,000 firms, LHB was recognized on The Zweig Group Hot Firm List as one of the 100 fastest-growing architecture, engineering, planning and environmental consulting firms in the United States and Canada. Placement is based on a firm’s percentage of revenue growth and dollar revenue growth over a three-year period. For more information: https://zweiggroup.com/awards/the-zweig-letter-hot-firm-list/2015_winners.php

+  LHB Welcomes New Interns, July 22, 2015

LHB Welcomes New Interns

July 22, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (July 22, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new interns to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

Reilly Kedrowski rejoins the Duluth Office working with the Pipeline Group. Reilly is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering with a Biomedical Engineering focus at the University of North Dakota.

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Zach Thompson rejoins the Duluth Office working with the Pipeline Group. He is pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology.

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Mark Nahorniak joins the Duluth Office working with the Public Works and Structures Group. Mark is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Playing outside linebacker for the University of Minnesota Duluth Football Team, Mark will enter his final season with the Bulldogs this coming fall.

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Emerson Smith joins the Duluth Office working with the Integrative Design Team. Emerson is currently pursuing his Master of Architecture degree at North Dakota State University. He is an active student member of the American Institute of Architects Students (AIAS) and the United States Green Building Council (USGBC).

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William Sell joins the Duluth Office working with the Integrative Design Team. He is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth and minoring in Math and Statistics.

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Lindsey Kieffaber joins the Minneapolis Office working with the Integrative Design Team. Lindsey is currently pursuing her Masters of Architecture at the University of Minnesota. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Growth and Structure of Cities and a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Bryn Mawr College.

 

 

 

 

 

Corey Schlosser joins the Duluth Office working with the Public Works and Structures Group. He is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota Duluth. Corey is an active member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

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Scott Crawford joins the Duluth Office working with the Pipeline Group. Scott is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance and Investment Banking from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Throughout the academic year, Scott serves the University Wellness Foundation in Madison, WI as Treasurer.

SRC_Scott_Crawford_PR

+  LHB New Hires and Department Changes, July 16, 2015

LHB New Hires and Department Changes

July 16, 2015

Duluth, Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (July 16, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees and department changes in our offices:

 

New Hire’s

Erica Christenson joins the Minneapolis Office as a Landscape Architect Project Manager. She received her Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Minnesota and her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Erica has been an Adjunct Professor at the University of Minnesota’s College of Design and Humphrey School for the last 2 years. A licensed Landscape Architect in Minnesota, she is an experienced Lead Designer and Project Manager for cultural, higher education, regional park, and commercial projects.

 

 

 

 

 

Emily Larson joins the Minneapolis Office as a Structural Designer. Emily graduated from Purdue University with her Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Rozenbergs joins the Minneapolis Office as a Designer. Jonathan received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Certificate of Metropolitan Design, and Master of Architecture all from the University of Minnesota’s College of Design. Previously, Jonathan worked as a Research Fellow and Junior Designer at the Metropolitan Design Center.

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Benson joins the Duluth Office as Senior Survey Crew Chief working with the Survey Group. Donald has over 17 years of survey experience on pipeline and utility projects.

DJB_Don_Benson_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Murphy joins the Duluth Office as an Intermediate Survey Crew Chief working with the Survey Group. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies and Certificate in Geographical Information Systems from the University of Minnesota Duluth.

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Paul Vartmann joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Paul received his Associate of Applied Science Degree and Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology from Lake Superior College.

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Rhonda Ozzello is now a Finance Coordinator working with the Corporate Group in the Duluth Office. Rhonda received her Associates Degree in Accounting from WITC-Superior, and has been with LHB since 2012.

RJO_Rhonda_Ozzello_PR

+  LHB Carter and Stine Presenting at Natio..., July 2, 2015

LHB Carter and Stine Presenting at National Conferences

July 2, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (July 2, 2015) – LHB Senior Vice President, Rick Carter will present at the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) Annual Meeting on “Leading with LEED: Why We Certify (Or Not)” at the Gaylord Opryland Convention Center in Nashville, Tennessee on Sunday, July 19th at 10:30 a.m.

Rick’s presentation focuses on the concerns campuses have with building and maintaining energy efficient buildings and how the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) guidelines compare to the Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines and SB 2030 Energy Program.

The National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) is a membership organization representing more than 2,500 colleges, universities, and higher education service providers across the country and around the world. For more information on NACUBO visit http://www.nacuboannualmeeting.org/.

LHB’s BIM Administrator, Dan Stine will be presenting twice at the Fifth North American Revit Technology Conference (RTC) at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Washington, DC. His first presentation on “Interior Design Workflows” takes place on Friday, July 24, 2015 at 2:30 p.m. This presentation will cover several concepts important to interior designers including keynoting, tagging materials, and program schedules. Dan’s second presentation on “JavaScript in Revit: For the Non-Programmer (Like Me)” will occur on Saturday, July 25, 2015 at 1:00 pm and will take a look at an exciting new add-in for Revit; namely ParmJS by Lazcad Technology. Users are able to populate Revit parameters using JavaScript expressions.

The Fifth North American Revit Technology Conference provides professionals opportunities to learn from the world’s top instructors and industry experts, and explore recent trends and technology. For more conference information visit http://www.cvent.com/events/rtc-north-america-2015/event-summary-a115ad5f3cb846638b8b3e8ae4c618bb.aspx.


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+  LHB Working with the School Districts of..., June 25, 2015

LHB Working with the School Districts of Superior and Hutchinson Public Schools

June 25, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (June 25, 2015) – LHB was selected to work with the School District of Superior in Wisconsin and Hutchinson Public Schools of Minnesota, to develop  concepts for public support to pass district referendums.

The School District of Superior recently worked with LHB to conduct a facility assessment of the district. Upon completion of the assessment, various opportunities were identified including the replacement of Cooper Elementary School and major educational improvements to the high school, enhanced safety, security, and energy efficiency improvements, along with the return on investment for maintenance, repair, and replacement projects. LHB is now providing referendum consulting, communication, design, and utilizing Kraus-Anderson to assist with construction management services for the district. The School District of Superior currently consists of eight buildings housing administration, staff, and 4,982 students. The School District of Superior covers the City of Superior, the Towns of Oakland, Parkland, Summit, and Superior, as well as the Villages of Oliver and Superior. The vote for the referendum is anticipated for April of 2016.

Q:13Proj130135600 DrawingsAImages130135 - Superior Schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hutchinson Public Schools selected LHB to work on their Bond Referendum Election. LHB and Hutchinson Public Schools’ administration, staff, and community members have been collaboratively working to develop a plan for the best solutions to improve the educational efficiency and functionality of the facilities. Several pre-design options have been reviewed to provide the Hutchinson team with a variety of options to consider. Upon the passage of a referendum, LHB will continue to provide various services throughout the design and construction phases of the project. The vote for the Bond Referendum Election is scheduled for November 3, 2015.

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+  Duluth looks to nix bricks, June 22, 2015

Duluth looks to nix bricks

June 22, 2015

130417_4th Ave W Streetscape


This past weekend will likely go down as one of the final times that Grandma’s runners pound the bricks through downtown Duluth.

Plans now in development would replace the bricked streets and walkways of Superior Street, probably with a mix of decorative concrete surfaces.

“The entire design will be different. For instance, now it has the red bricks and that historic feel. I think the design that we’re aiming for is something that is pretty timeless — that fits into the historic context of the downtown but is not going to be red bricks,” said Jennifer Reed Moses, a planner for the city of Duluth.

Whatever surfaces are chosen, she said the appearance should be anything but monolithic.

“They may be different materials or different colors, but there will be differentiation in the pavement just to avoid that look of having one big sea of concrete,” Reed Moses said.

The emerging vision for the reconstruction of downtown Duluth’s main thoroughfare will take center stage at a community meeting Tuesday night (see below for details).

Competing desires

The city has had to consider competing interests for the 80-foot wide right-of-way, including parking, pedestrian use, motorized traffic and bicyclists visiting downtown Duluth.

“Parking has been a primary concern for our downtown businesses. While we want the street to look different, it’s so important to retain the parking we have on Superior,” said Kristi Stokes, president of the Greater Downtown Council. She called Superior Street “the heart of the city” and an “economic engine” for the downtown.

The preferred layout now advancing actually would increase Superior’s parking inventory by two slots between Fourth Avenue East and Sixth Avenue West, said Brad Scott, a project engineer with LHB.

Current plans call for diagonal parking on the upper side of Superior and parallel parking on the lower side.

“The importance of pedestrian space on Superior Street is in the forefront of our minds,” Reed Moses said.

To make the streetscape more inviting for people strolling by, the city has looked to provide space for outdoor dining, trees, shrubs, flowers, benches and public art.

What got squeezed out of the picture, however, was a dedicated bicycle corridor.

“We looked at whether we could do bike lanes on Superior Street, but we just didn’t have enough room,” said Keith Hamre, Duluth’s director of planning and construction services.

He said the city is looking at the feasibility of channeling bicycle traffic into dedicated lanes on neighboring Michigan Street and First Street.

“We know that as we bring the Superior Street project forward, we also will need an answer on how to accommodate bicycles,” Hamre said, explaining that the city will strive to make Duluth’s downtown a more inviting place for people to ride.

Reed Moses noted that bicyclists will be able to use Superior Street, too, as some do today already, but the diagonal parking could make the road less inviting than others.

Public Input

Barry Warner of SRF Consulting has helped orchestrate public involvement in the discussion over Superior Street and gave the community high marks for engagement with well over 100 people attending each meeting to date.

“We’ve had a very robust participation to date,” he said, noting that there have been strong showings at each of the public meetings, despite sometimes-challenging weather, including sub-zero temperatures.”

Six public forums on the project are planned before a final plan emerges.

“This fifth public meeting is meant to be the debut of the preferred streetscape layout,” Scott said.

So far, civility has generally prevailed, according to Warner.

“I would say people have been very cordial to one another even when they had differences of opinion,” he said.

Meeting participants have provided valuable guidance, he said.

“They’ve told us they want something that is durable but functional. They want something that is attractive, and they’ve used the phrase: ‘Be Duluth.’ They also want something that is flexible and that has the opportunity to be programmed for different events. They want to celebrate the four seasons and integrate public art. But they also want us to be very mindful of maintenance and snow removal and some of the other challenges that the city faces.”

That’s a lot to juggle, and as the city works to develop a thoughtful plan, the anticipated start date for the project has been pushed back from 2016 to 2017 at the earliest, Reed Moses said.

Shifting start

The timeline could be pushed back even further depending on the city’s success in obtaining state bonding money to help swap out old steam pipes under Superior with a more efficient closed-loop system using recirculating hot water.

“It could definitely be a driver of the timeline,” said Hamre of the bond funding.

“You get one chance with a project like this,” he said. “You don’t want to dig up Superior Street twice.”

Not including the expense of the steam line conversion, Scott said replacing Superior Street plus upgrading the other utility infrastructure below it could easily cost $15 million to $20 million.

The street will be built in sections from west to east over the course of three years, with an eye toward minimizing the disruption to downtown commerce.

Stakeholders want the street to be distinctive and show the personality of Duluth, according to Stokes.

“I feel confident it will not look like a cookie cutter streetscape. Even if it’s not full of bricks, we can still create a signature look for our downtown,” Stokes said.

The city’s decisions on the design of Superior Street will set the stage for other improvements, Reed Moses predicted.

“Whatever design we end up developing on Superior Street will feed into the rest of downtown as we redo the rest of the streets,” she said.

If you go

WHAT: Community meeting to discuss pending reconstruction of Duluth’s Superior Street

WHERE: Great Hall, Radisson Hotel, 505 W. Superior St.

WHEN: 4:30 p.m. Tuesday

Duluth Tribune News

link to online article

+  LHB Employee Licensure and Certification..., June 19, 2015

LHB Employee Licensure and Certifications

June 19, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (June 19, 2015) – Adam Besse received his Professional Engineer license in Civil Engineering from the State of Minnesota. Adam joined LHB in 2012 and works with the Public Works Group in the Duluth Office. Adam provides analysis, design, plan production, and construction administration for site design including water, sewer, grading, and drainage projects.  He graduated from the University of North Dakota with his Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering.

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Mary Keefe recently became a certified Envision Sustainability Professional (ENV SP) from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI). ISI is a not-for-profit organization structured to develop and maintain a sustainability rating system for civil infrastructure. Attaining this certification allows Mary to work with project teams to use the Envision sustainable infrastructure rating system as a guide to address sustainability issues in the design, construction, and operation of infrastructure projects. In addition to Mary becoming certified, LHB is a sustaining member of ISI and an Envision Qualified Company. Mary graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with her Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. She joined LHB’s Superior, WI Office in 2013 as a Civil Designer. For more information see http://sustainableinfrastructure.org/index.cfm

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Jean Farmakes, John Lawless, Laura Heck, and Linda Kerr received their Construction Documents Technology (CDT) certification from the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI). The CDT certification demonstrates a comprehensive level of competence for those who write, interpret, enforce, or manage construction documents. The mission of CSI is to advance building information management and education of project teams to improve facility performance. For more information see http://www.csinet.org/

 

Jean Farmakes, J.D. joined LHB’s Corporate Office in 2014 as General Counsel working out of the Duluth Office. Jean’s expertise in state and federal law aids LHB in managing risk, and ensuring compliance. She attended the University of Minnesota Law School graduating with her Juris Doctorate.

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John Lawless joined LHB’s Corporate Office in 2014 as a Safety Specialist working in the Duluth Office. John has over 15 years of experience in helping companies identify loss exposures by analyzing risks and recommending controls. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with his Master of Industrial Safety with an emphasis in Industrial Hygiene.

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Laura Heck joined LHB’s Minneapolis Office in 2014 as an Administrative Assistant. Laura graduated from the Harrington College of Design in Chicago, IL with her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Interior Design.

 

 

 

 

 

Linda Kerr joined LHB’s Duluth Office in 2013 as an Administrative Assistant. Linda attended Washington Technical Institute in Seattle, WA where she received her Electronics Technician Certification.

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+  LHB New Staff and Promotions, June 15, 2015

LHB New Staff and Promotions

June 15, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (June 15, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees and promotions to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

 

NEW STAFF

Megan Goplin joins the Duluth Office as a Civil Project Engineer for the Civil Group. Megan graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering. She brings over seven years of site, stormwater, utility, roadway and intersection design experience to LHB.

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Nasir Sakandar joins the Minneapolis Office as a Senior Marketing Coordinator. Nasir received his Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Minnesota and brings over seven years of professional writing and creative management experience with him. His work has been published in online and print media.

 

 

 

 

 

Tara Anderson joins the Duluth Office as an Architectural Designer with the Integrative Design Team. She recently graduated from North Dakota State University with a Master of Architecture degree. Throughout her academic career Tara volunteered with the American Institute of Architects Student (AIAS) led community service program, Freedom by Design (FBD).

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Alec Ashton joins the Duluth Office as a Mechanical Designer working with the Integrative Design Team. He recently graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Throughout his academic career Alec was actively involved with UMD’s Bulldog Rocketry Club and the Formula-Society of Automotive Engineers (FSAE) Team.

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Tyler Niemann joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group. He is pursuing his Bachelor of Accounting at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Tyler has previously worked as a survey crew member in Golden Valley, MN.

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Conor Schultz joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group. Conor graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Arts in Geography. He currently serves the Minnesota Army National Guard as a Firefinder Radar Operator.

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Jared Harger joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group.

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Brock Anderson joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group. He is currently pursuing his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering focusing in geo-technical engineering at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

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Joseph Flanagan joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group. He is currently enrolled at Lake Superior College.

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William Redding joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group. William currently serves as an infantryman in the Army National Guard.

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PROMOTIONS

Sarah Crook joined the Minneapolis Office in 2010 and is now working as an Architectural Designer with the Integrative Design Team. Sarah received her Bachelor of Science and Master of Architecture from North Dakota State University (NDSU) and is a U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED Green Associate. Throughout her academic career Sarah volunteered with the NDSU chapter of Habitat for Humanity and USGBC.

 

 

 

 

 

Travis Floren joined the Minneapolis Office in 2014 and is now working as a Mechanical Designer with the Pipeline Group. Travis recently received his Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Throughout his academic career, Travis was an active member of the University of Minnesota Navigators and Engineers Without Boarders.

+  Whole Foods store construction delay in ..., June 15, 2015

Whole Foods store construction delay in West Duluth saved money

June 15, 2015

3D View of North and East sides WF_6pm_Final with Sky


After a nine-month delay, construction finally started last week in West Duluth on Whole Foods Co-op’s new store.

But before the member-owned co-op announced the milestone for the $3.8 million construction project, General Manager Sharon Murphy wanted to make sure it actually would happen.

“It’s very exciting, but it will feel more real when I see activity on the site,” she said on Tuesday.

She got her wish.

On Wednesday, fences started going up at the one-acre site at 45th Avenue West and Grand Avenue, below Denfeld High School. Heavy equipment arrived, and a big excavator soon was digging in. It’ll be the long-anticipated second location for Whole Foods Co-op, which has a store at 610 E. Fourth St.

If all goes well, construction led by Johnson-Wilson Constructors will wrap up in mid-February with the store opening in early March.

That’s nearly a year later than the previous timeline, which had construction starting last fall and the store opening this spring.

So why the delay?

“We decided not to do winter construction,” Murphy explained. “We didn’t want to spend the extra costs it would take. It takes money to keep the site warm enough, not for the people, but for the equipment. And the ground has to be warm enough to work in.”

She estimated the co-op saved about $200,000 by waiting. She said another holdup came in securing two loans for different aspects of the construction. That eventually was worked out with $3.8 million in financing through Members Cooperative Credit Union.

But with the hillside store doing well — membership is up to 8,400 and annual revenue rose to $16.6 million in the past year — Whole Foods didn’t need to open the new store sooner.

“Our history is not to move quickly on expansion,” she said. “Last time, it took us six years to find our other location and another 1½ years to get it opened. This feels to me that it’s moving at normal speed.”

Still, it has left many wondering what the holdup was after the September groundbreaking.

“Lots of people are quite anxious to find out when this store opens,” Murphy said. “They say they will become a member then. Lots are looking forward to it.”

Two stores, similar features

The one-story, 12,500-square-foot building will have an additional 1,500 square feet of basement space. Its 7,500 square feet of retail space will be roughly the same as the hillside store but with wider aisles.

Designed by LHB architects, the new store will have a brick facade, numerous windows and 18-foot-high ceilings, giving it an open look and feel. Like the hillside store, it will have a deli, hot bar, salad bar, a teaching kitchen for cooking classes, a large bulk-food section, locally grown and organic produce and sustainably sourced products. The store will have 60 jobs to fill.

The project’s total cost is actually $6.4 million. That includes $3.8 million for construction that meets Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification standards, store equipment and inventory, consultants’ fees and the $1.05 million purchase price for the former Jefferson Lines bus station site. That building was torn down in recent months.

The delay will result in some unexpected benefits. The store will open after construction work underway on the Bong Bridge is completed, affecting customers coming from Superior.

“That’ll be done when we open, and that’ll be great,” Murphy said.

And when the store opens in 2016, major reconstruction will be starting in front of the hillside store on East Fourth Street.

“So it’s very important to have the other store up and running before that happens,” she said.

Link to article

 

 

+  LHB Recognized by Engineering News-Recor..., June 10, 2015

LHB Recognized by Engineering News-Record and American Society of Landscape Architects

June 10, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (June 10, 2015) – LHB ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural design firms in the nation by Engineering News-Record (ENR) at No. 328. This is LHB’s fourth time on the ENR Top 500 Design Firms List. The ENR list ranks the 500 largest U.S.-based designs firms, both publicly and privately held based on design-specific revenue.

More info at: http://enr.construction.com/toplists/Top-Design-Firms/001-100.asp

 

ASLA-MN PLANNING AND ANALYSIS HONOR AWARD

CMRRP_aerial_PRThe Mississippi Central Riverfront Regional Master Plan was awarded the Professional Design Honor Award for Planning and Analysis from the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Minnesota. Working with our partner and lead consultant, SRF Consulting, and completed in March 2015, LHB offered landscape architecture, planning, community engagement and design services on this project.

LHB facilitated stakeholder and design charrette activities to engage community members in the design process. Sarah Weeks, an LHB Landscape Designer and Lydia Major, an LHB Landscape Architect Project Manager were both very involved in the design and community engagement processes, including assisting with public meetings and design charrettes. The community process generated a strong sense of ownership among participants that continues to build momentum for implementation and development.

The Mississippi Central Riverfront Regional Park is comprised of park lands, open spaces, and trails. The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board focused on updating the nine riverfront focus areas that the regional park encompasses. In order to serve the active population surrounding the park, a variety of vibrant outdoor spaces and amenities were required, within the unique environmental, historical, and social contexts of the area. Each focus area was defined and addressed by designers and architects on the team independently and as part of the whole regional park system.

More info at: http://asla-mn.org/2015-awards

+  Pathways To Places – Sharing Downt..., June 9, 2015

Pathways To Places – Sharing Downtown Together

June 9, 2015

 

ptplogo-final_webjpgThe Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board and the City of Minneapolis are looking for the public’s input on the use of parks and public spaces in downtown Minneapolis. They have created an interactive map questionnaire that is mobile-friendly allowing you to share ideas about a specific park or place, the path you take to get there, and how you’d improve the experience right from your smartphone, tablet, or computer. LHB, and our partner on this project, MIG, would like to encourage you to share this with your friends, neighbors, coworkers or associations to collect the best ideas and information about downtown’s parks and public spaces. Click here or copy and paste the URL below to participate in their short questionnaire.

http://bit.ly/pathwaystoplaces

 

+  LHB’s Thea Holmberg-Johnson to Spe..., June 1, 2015

LHB’s Thea Holmberg-Johnson to Speak at UMACS Conference

June 1, 2015

TCH_Thea_Holberg_Johnson_PR

 

 

 

 

 

LHB’s Thea Holmberg-Johnson will speak at the Upper Midwest Association for Campus Sustainability (UMACS) Conference in Bemidji, Minnesota on “Measureable Outcomes: Tracking Actual Energy and Water Use at 54 Campuses” on June 19th at 10:15 a.m., on the Bemidji State University Campus.

The Measurable Outcomes project tracks the actual energy and water consumption of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) System’s 54 campuses, which includes over 300 million square feet of building area. To meet MnSCU’s goals of reducing resource consumption and operating costs, this project provides a tracking system of baseline and benchmark comparisons between buildings and campuses. Five campuses that reduced their energy by greater than 25% were selected for case studies that reviewed how campuses achieved energy reductions, what they invested, and how much was saved in resources and money as a result.

The 2015 UMACS Conference will be held at Bemidji State University in Bemidji, MN from June 17-19th. Established in 2005, UMACS is a volunteer-run organization that works to share information and resources on campus sustainability, to encourage campuses to establish and share information from ongoing environmental audits to evaluate campus performance against real-world benchmarks, and to break down barriers to collaboration between and within campuses. For more information see http://umacs.org/conference/.

Thea Holmberg-Johnson, Assoc. AIA, is a designer and researcher involved in a variety of sustainable building research and architectural projects. Thea’s building research involves collecting, analyzing, visualizing, and synthesizing data at building, organization, and city-wide scales. She received her Master of Architecture from the University of Minnesota and continues to pursue her Master of Science in Sustainable Design there as well.

+  LHB Welcomes New Staff, May 28, 2015

LHB Welcomes New Staff

May 28, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (May 28, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN offices:

 

Karin Stuber joins the Minneapolis Office as an Architect. Karin holds a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design from North Dakota State University. Previously, Karin served as project manager and architect on several K-12 school projects in the Duluth and Twin Cities, MN areas and Denver, CO.

 

 

 

 

 

Ross Conklin joins the Corporate Office as an Application Developer and will be stationed in Minneapolis. Ross has over seven years of experience as an IT applications administrator and workstation support technician. He received his Bachelor of Science in Cell and Molecular Biology from Winona State University.

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Liebelt joins the Minneapolis Office as a Technician College Intern. He is currently pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Applied Science at Dunwoody College of Technology. He is a student member of Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and the American Institute of Architects Students (AIAS) group at Dunwoody.

 

 

 

 

 

James Matthes joins the Minneapolis Office as a Technician College Intern. He is currently pursuing his Associate in Applied Science and Bachelor of Architecture Degrees at Dunwoody College of Technology. He is a student member of Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) and serves as the Executive Manager of the American Institute of Architects Students (AIAS) group at Dunwoody.

 

 

 

 

 

Shawn Aljoe joins the Minneapolis Office as a Technician College Intern working with the Architecture Group. Shawn currently attends Shakopee High School in Shakopee, MN.

SCA_Shawn_Aljoe_PR

+  LHB Promotions, May 22, 2015

LHB Promotions

May 22, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI (May 22, 2015) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following promotions in our Duluth, Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI offices:

 

Terza Kurki has been promoted to Senior Marketing Coordinator in the Minneapolis Office. Terza has been with LHB for 12 years. She is an active member of the Twin Cities Chapter of the Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS-TC) and has been involved with various committees over the course of 10 years.

Terza Kurki_0102_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Phil Fisher joined LHB in 2014 and has accepted a position as a Project Coordinator of Communications working with the Integrative Design Team.

Phil Fisher_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Matt von Mosch is now working as a Technician for the Pipeline group after participating in LHB’s On-The-Job CAD Training Program.

matthewvonmosch_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Megan Rippberger is now working in the Integrative Design Team as a Technician after completing LHB’s On-The-Job CAD Training Program. Megan received her Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts from the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

MSR_Megan_Rippberger_PR

 

 

 

 

David Strand is now working in the Superior office as a Technician after participating in LHB’s On-The-Job CAD Training Program.

davidstrand_PR

 

 

 

 

Thomas Pavick is now working as a Survey Coordinator out of the Duluth Office. Tom has over 12 years of construction and field surveying, civil engineering design, and CAD drafting experience.

TAP_Tom_Pavick_PR

 

 

 

 

Derek Morse is now working as a Senior Crew Chief for the Survey Group out of the Duluth Office. Derek has over 16 years of experience in surveying, inspecting, and drafting.

DMM_Derek_Morse_PR

 

 

 

 

Tony Hanson has been promoted to Senior Crew Chief for the Survey group out of the Duluth Office. Tony has over 15 years of surveying and computer aided drafting experience.

tonyhanson_PR

 

 

 

 

Doug Freitag is now working as a Senior Crew Chief for the Survey group out of the Duluth Office.

DJF_Douglas_J_Freitag_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Carson is now working as an Intermediate Crew Chief for the Survey Group in the Duluth Office. Lee graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with degrees in Geographic Information Systems and Geography in May of 2013.

LBC_Lee_Carson_PR

 

 

 

 

 

Charlie Thannum joined the Duluth Office in 2013 and is now working as an Intermediate Crew Chief for the Survey Group.

CRT_Charles_Thannum_PR

 

 

 

 

Adam Erkkila is now working as a Survey Technician for the Survey group out of the Duluth Office.

ARE_Adam_Erkkila_PR

 

 

 

 

Laurel Johnston joined LHB in 2013 and is now working as an Architectural Designer in the Minneapolis Office.

+  2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competi..., May 5, 2015

2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition

May 5, 2015

LHB’s Laurel Johnston and her team (Team Opti-MN – University of Minnesota-Minneapolis) competed in the Department of Energy (DOE) Race to Zero Competition which took place in April. The competition was nation-wide and involved 33 teams from 27 U.S. and Canadian universities competing to design cost-effective, zero energy homes for mainstream builders. Team Opti-MN was the Grand Winner of the competition. 

For more information about the competition and the results, please see the following links

http://energy.gov/eere/buildings/2015-results

http://energy.gov/articles/race-zero-student-design-competition-inspiring-next-generation-building-scientists

http://energy.gov/eere/buildings/downloads/2015-race-zero-competition-grand-winner-and-grand-winner-finalist-team

http://finance-commerce.com/2015/06/sustainable-u-of-m-team-wins-home-design-competition/

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/green-building-news/minnesota-students-win-race-zero-title

 

+  LHB’s Cheryl Rouse Named to SDA To..., April 29, 2015

LHB’s Cheryl Rouse Named to SDA Today’s “A List”

April 29, 2015

LHB’s Cheryl Rouse was featured in the Society of Design Administration’s (SDA) March issue of SDA Today and named to their “A List.” Rouse, a Senior Administrative Assistant, has been with LHB for over 25 years.

Rouse’s goal is to “be a better mentor to the administrative staff, by encouraging them to grow and to help them to achieve their goals.” Her role at LHB includes contract administration, project management assistance, project team and client communication coordination, and developing administrative document standards and procedures for the company. The “A List” is comprised of chapter members and members-at-large nominated for their outstanding commitment to the bettering of themselves and their peers in the A/E/C industry. Rouse is a graduate of Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College (WITC), and a Certified Construction Documents Technologist (CDT).

SDA is a nonprofit organization comprised of management and administrative personnel engaged in administrative services at architecture/engineering/construction (A/E/C) firms and related fields. Their goal is to advance management and administrative personnel in the A/E/C industry through education, networking, leadership and resources.

CKR-1

+  LHB Welcomes New Staff, April 29, 2015

LHB Welcomes New Staff

April 29, 2015

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees and promotions in our Duluth and Minneapolis, MN and Superior, WI offices:

 

New Employees

Thomas Fennessey joins the Superior, WI office as an Owner’s Representative in LHB’s Integrative Design Team. Tom holds a Master’s Degree in Project Management from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. He recently retired from his position as the Director of Facilities Management from the University of Wisconsin-Superior and also currently serves as a City Councilor for the 2nd District of the City of Superior, WI.

TDF_Tom_D_FennesseyPR

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deborah Zimmerman joins the Minneapolis Office as an Engineering Specialist in the Integrative Design Team. Deb graduated from the University of Kansas with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Interior Design and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Architectural Engineering with an area of specialty in building electrical systems. She has over 20 years of electrical engineering experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Pettigrew joins the Minneapolis Office as an Architect for the Integrative Design Team. Jonathan received his Master’s Degree in Architecture from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA.


 

 

 

 

 

Daniel Weatherly joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Daniel served in the US Army, 173rd Airborne Brigade as a Motor Transport Operator.

DJW_Daniel_Weatherly_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joby Davidsavor joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Joby graduated with an Associate of Applied Science Degree from Lake Superior College in the Civil Engineering Technology Program.

 JLD_Joby_Davidsavor_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucas Kirby joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Survey Group.

LRK_Lucas_Kirby_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riley Lender joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Riley is also a current Airman in the Air National Guard.

REL_Riley_Lender_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Wolbert joins the Minneapolis Office as an Architectural Specialist. A graduate of Princeton University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering with Architectural Certificate, Sarah also holds a Master of Science Degree in Sustainable Design and a Master of Architecture Degree both from the University of Minnesota, College of Design and has been a LEED Accredited Professional since 2004.

SAW_Sarah_Wolbert_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janessa Lott joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative College Intern. Janessa is pursuing a degree in Health Information Management from the College of Saint Scholastica.

JCL_Janessa_Lott_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michelle Bredin joins the Duluth Office as a Marketing College Intern. Michelle graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Writing Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Gainor joins the Duluth Office as a Lead Crew Chief for the Survey Group. John has over 15 years of experience in construction and land surveying.

Kyle Keelan joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician. Kyle received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Physics from Allegheny College in Meadville, PA.

 

Promotions

­­Joshua Mayfield joined LHB in 2012 while pursuing a degree at Lake Superior College. Josh has accepted a regular position in the Duluth Office as an Intermediate Technician working with the Public Works/Structures Group.

JRM_Josh_Mayfield_PR 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Ronning joined LHB in 2012 and is now a Technician for the Pipeline Group in the Duluth Office.

MGR_Mark_Ronning_PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Tuffield in the Duluth Office began as a Technician College Intern in 2014 while pursuing a degree in Computer Aided Design Engineering at Lake Superior College. He is now a Technician working with the Pipeline Group.

JRT_John_Tuffield_PR

+  Featured in Land and Water Magazine: The..., April 1, 2015

Featured in Land and Water Magazine: The Promenade of Wayzata

April 1, 2015

Civil engineering mimicks native wetland conditions for this mixed use development of an old mall site. Click here to read the full article on page 19 in the new issue of Land and Water Magazine. A summary of the innovative design can be found on our website.

+  Local Engineering Firm/Project Earns Nat..., March 20, 2015

Local Engineering Firm/Project Earns National Honor for Excellence

March 20, 2015

MINNESOTA REGIONAL INDICATORS INITIATIVE CITED IN NATIONAL ENGINEERING COMPETITION

Duluth Firm’s Cutting-Edge Study Tracks Future Environmental Impacts of Growth

WASHINGTON, DC (March 10, 2015)–LHB, Inc., of Duluth, Minn., has earned a National Recognition Award for exemplary engineering achievement in the American Council of Engineering Companies’ (ACEC) 49th annual Engineering Excellence Awards for developing the Regional Indicators Initiative (RII) for the Urban Land Institute Minnesota in Minneapolis.

The RII collected seven years of publicly available energy, water, travel, and waste data for 28 Minnesota cities, with the results aggregated into annual cost and greenhouse gas inventories.  This “deep dive” into regional metrics is already being used by city planners as they assess future development and associated infrastructure needs, highlighting opportunities for innovative engineering to save resources and money.

Originating as a pilot to determine the feasibility of tracking citywide metrics, RII has evolved into the largest research project of its kind in the world, involving partnerships with cities, state agencies, private utility companies, waste and wastewater facilities, and non-profit organizations.

The project is among 170 engineering projects throughout the nation and around the world recognized by ACEC as preeminent engineering achievements and eligible for one of the top 2015 Engineering Excellence Awards. Judging for the Engineering Excellence Awards—known industry-wide as the “Academy Awards of the engineering industry”—took place in February and was conducted by a panel of more than 30 engineers, architects, government officials, media members, and academics. Awards criteria include uniqueness and originality, technical innovation, social and economic value, complexity, and success in meeting goals.

Final winners, including 16 Honor Awards, eight Grand Awards and the prestigious “Grand Conceptor Award” for the year’s most outstanding overall engineering achievement, will be announced at the Engineering Excellence Awards Gala, a black-tie event to be held Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at The Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C.

The American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) is the business association of America’s engineering industry, representing more than 5,000 independent engineering firms and more than 325,000 professionals throughout the United States engaged in the development of America’s transportation, water and energy infrastructure, along with environmental, industrial and other public and private facilities.   Founded in 1909 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., ACEC is a national federation of 51 state and regional organizations.

###

Theresia Christanti
American Council of Engineering Companies
Manager, Awards Programs
1015 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC  20005-2605
Phone: 202-347-7474
Fax      : 202-682-4360
E-Mail: tchrist@acec.org

+  LHB 2014 Food Drive Challenge Again Unit..., February 12, 2015

LHB 2014 Food Drive Challenge Again Unites Minnesota Consulting Firms, Benefits Local Communities

February 12, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (February 12, 2015) – LHB was part of a group of 13 Minnesota engineering and environmental consulting firms who used the spirit of competition to fuel a contribution drive that yielded over $175,000 and over eight tons of food and clothing for food shelves around the state.

The effort was the third annual collaboration between firms that are friendly competitors in business and included Alliant Engineering, American Engineering Testing, Barr Engineering, Bolton & Menk, Braun Intertec, LHB, MBJ, SEH, SRF, TKDA, Wenck, WSB, and WSN. The level of competition is good as it raises funds for an important cause.

“LHB is proud to participate in the Food Drive Challenge with our industry friends. LHB’s combined corporation and staff donations contributed $2,840 to Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank serving the Twin Ports area and $1,149 to Second Harvest Heartland serving the Twin Cities,” according to Bill Bennett, CEO.

Donations were made to food shelves and charities statewide, including 360 Communities (Burnsville), Bloomington Food Shelf, Buffalo Food Shelf, Catholic Charities (St. Cloud), Channel One Food Shelf (Rochester), Christian Cupboard Emergency Food Shelf (Woodbury), Eagan Food Shelf, Emergency Food Network, Feed My Starving Children, Helping Hands Food Shelf (Delano), Hibbing Food Shelf, Hunger Solutions Minnesota, ICA Food Shelf (Minnetonka), Keystone Community Services, Mankato Echo Food Shelf, Minnesota FoodShare, Neighborhood House Food Shelf, Second Harvest Northern Lakes Food Bank (Duluth), PROP (People Reaching out to Other People), Salvation Army Martin County Food Shelf, Second Harvest Heartland East (St. Paul), Second Harvest Heartland West (Golden Valley), Sharing and Caring Hands, Sleepy Eye Area Food Shelf, The Food Group, The Pet Project, United Way, and VEAP (Volunteers Enlisted to Assist People).

+  United Properties gets city nod for hote..., February 9, 2015

United Properties gets city nod for hotel block

February 9, 2015

 

United Properties is proposing The Gateway, a 36-story tower with 300 residential units and a 182-room Hilton hotel, for the vacant city block at 30 Third St. S. in Minneapolis. (Submitted rendering: LHB Inc.)

With a key Minneapolis vote of confidence in hand, Bloomington-based United Properties is ready to press on with its plan to bring a 36-story hotel and apartment tower to a block once described as the “sexiest” parcel in downtown Minneapolis.

And the developer says that maybe — just maybe — the ultimate project on the site could grow taller.
The city announced Friday morning that a review team will recommend that United Properties be selected as developer for the vacant city site at 30 Third St. S., commonly referred to as the Nicollet Hotel Block.

The city said United’s “Gateway” project – with a 182-room full-service Hilton hotel called The Canopy and 300 apartments – distinguished itself because it had the highest-density hotel and residential uses, it included a large public gathering space and the developer’s offer for the city-owned property was the highest on the table. Financial details of the project will be released at a later date, Mayor Betsy Hodges said at a press conference at Marquette Plaza.

After the press conference, United executive Bill Katter told Finance & Commerce that the developer has been asked about “whether we would add condos.”

If the company decided to include the for-sale units, it would either displace some apartments in the 36-story design or put them atop the tower, increasing the building’s height anywhere from eight to 12 stories, said Katter, United’s executive vice president of investments and development.

The development comes as downtown Minneapolis is going through an apartment building boom and a hotel boomlet, but Katter isn’t worried about the competition.

“If you deliver product with an unmet demand, I think there’s plenty of runway,” he said, adding that the apartments will be about a third larger than a standard luxury unit downtown. He went on to say that the Canopy won’t “compete with anybody” because of its unique nature and top-end location.

Four developers responded to a city request for proposals in October. One response included an 80-story tower, which was eliminated from consideration earlier this month.

“The result of great urban design is similar to a great party – you linger longer, lose track of time, and stumble home way later than planned,” said City Council Member Jacob Frey, who represents the area and has described as the block the “sexiest” parcel in downtown. “By delivering on our promise of growth, facilitating a connection to the river, and seriously activating the public realm, the new Nicollet Hotel Block could be one of the best parties of the decade.”

Plans will remain fluid until a development contract between the city and developer is finalized later this year. That means there’s room for the project to shrink or grow.

Despite the fact that the block was at one point the target of a developer proposing an 80-story tower – ultimately rejected by city planners for incomplete application information – United Properties didn’t feel any pressure from the public to go higher, Katter said.

“Every project has to be rooted in feasibility,” he said. “…We didn’t think that 80 stories was feasible.”

The proposed tower would rise at the northeast corner of Hennepin Avenue and Third Street South, with space for a streetcar line planned for Nicollet and Central avenues to make its way through the site. The site is also two blocks from the Nicollet Mall light rail station.

The streetcar stop would be surrounded by a public plaza, which would include a “broad staircase” leading to the skyway level, said project architect R. Bruce Cornwall of LHB Inc., the project’s design firm, at the press conference.

At night, one side of the building will be illuminated in LED displays that will mimic the movement of the Mississippi River and could be lit for other celebrations, such as the Fourth of July.

The project will also include a pair of two-story buildings along Third Street, meant to primarily offer retail space, some hotel rooms, a rooftop amenity deck and a potential charter school.

United Properties’ project partners include Stuart Development Corp., Aimbridge Hospitality and FRM Associates, which owns the neighboring Marquette Plaza tower.

The city’s original request for proposals sought an iconic project with no less than 20 active floors. United Properties will present its full plan Feb. 16 to the Downtown Minneapolis Neighborhood Association.

A City Council committee will consider the recommendation in either late March or early April before a full council vote. The city staff would then negotiate a term sheet with United Properties and seek council authorization in late summer to sell the land and execute a redevelopment contract.

Other projects considered for the city block included Bloomington-based Doran Cos.’ 30-story residential tower and six-story hotel and Golden Valley-based Mortenson Development’s 31-story project with 273 apartments, a 171-room hotel, five stories of office, ground floor retail and other public space.

Minneapolis-based Marquette Advisors estimated earlier this year that 2,556 new apartments have opened downtown since late 2012. In the third quarter of 2014, the downtown vacancy rate was 3.1 percent.

Existing or under construction projects within a few blocks of the Nicollet Hotel block include Ryan Cos.’ 286-unit 222 Hennepin, the Opus Group’s 253-unit Nic on Fifth and Mortenson Development’s 30-story, 262-unit 4Marq, set to open late this year.

Residential projects with similar timing to The Gateway include two potential high-rise residential towers on what Opus refers to as the Ritz Block, Alatus LLC’s planned 40-story, 325-unit residential tower in northeast Minneapolis (which could be condos), Schafer Richardson’s planned 29-story residential tower on the Nye’s Polonaise site and Ryan’s planned 25- to 35-story, 360-unit residential tower in the Downtown East neighborhood.

On the hotel front, Mortenson is working to finish a Hampton Inn & Suites on Eighth Street North and will soon start work on an AC Hotel by Marriott on Fourth Street and Hennepin Avenue downtown.

New hotel adaptations have also been pitched for the Jackson Building about three blocks west of the Nicollet Hotel Block and the Plymouth Building about three blocks south.

The Nicollet Hotel block has been vacant since 1991, when crews demolished the 18-story Nicollet Hotel. The city of Minneapolis acquired the property in 1993 with federal transit funds, with plans for a transit terminal there. RFPs for a terminal were unsuccessful in 2002, 2004 and 2005, and the city was released from obligations related to the transit funds in 2013.

“If this site was easy to develop, it would have been done already,” said City Council Member Lisa Goodman, whose ward used to include the site. “…Thankfully, waiting was to our benefit.”

Construction is anticipated to begin in early or mid-2016.

By: Adam Voge February 6, 2015 8:59 am | Finance & Commerce

+  Brooklyn Park first Twin Cities suburb t..., February 2, 2015

Brooklyn Park first Twin Cities suburb to open teen shelter

February 2, 2015

On severely cold winter nights, homeless teens and young adults often are left with few options.

If they can’t couch hop at friends’ houses, they may have to turn to strangers for help.

To address the need, the city of Brooklyn Park spent $950,000 to build a teen shelter, and brought in the Minneapolis nonprofit Avenues for Homeless Youth to run it. Community leaders will celebrate its opening today and hold an open house on Saturday.

That makes the city the first Twin Cities suburb to open a shelter designed for young people. The new 12-bed shelter, called Brooklyn Avenues, will serve young people ages 16 through 20 who have been kicked out of their homes or run away and have no safe place to go.

The shelter, which opens next week, went up in the northwest suburb without a fight. Supporters say people in the community recognized a need and came together.

“Every time we have these severe cold winter nights, I’m always concerned about those people who have nowhere to be out of the cold, and here I am in a nice, warm house,” said Barb Dahlquist, a volunteer for the Prince of Peace Lutheran Church.

Dahlquist, a retired teacher, felt drawn to help collect donations for shelter.

As workmen put the finishing touches on the building, the shelter is getting ready for the teenagers, stocking up on alarm clocks, fleece blankets and body wash.

“We’ve gotten 12 bars of soap, 12 lip balm, 36 toothbrushes, 24 tubes of toothpaste,” said Linda Forkey, another volunteer from Prince of Peace.

The new shelter will fill a void in Brooklyn Park, where police officers encounter teens who have run away from group homes or adoptive parents and are easy prey for predators, said Lt. Toni Weinbeck, who commands the overnight shift.

“Within 24 to 48 hours, somebody had stopped, some adult had stopped, pulled them into an apartment and made them feel wanted, welcome,” she said. “And they grab onto them and they victimize them.”

One sex trafficking ring Weinbeck investigated in 2011 involved 11 victims. She turned to Brooklyn Park Mayor Jeff Lunde for help.

“I was so passionate about it, I was pounding tables,” Weinbeck said. “I was telling him we just don’t have the resources for those victims, for those runaways. And he took that and ran with it.”

The new shelter has tidy bedrooms that look like single dorm rooms, furnished with twin beds, desks and armoires. Staff and residents at Avenues for Homeless Youth shelter in north Minneapolis named the bedrooms after social justice and civil rights leaders, and popular entertainers.

“We have the Muhammad Ali room and the Selena room and the Nelson Mandela room and Obama,” Executive Director Deb Loon said.

Downstairs are large common areas, where teens will share three meals a day.

“When a young person moves in here, they’ll get all their basic needs met which is the first and most important thing for us to do: provide a safe place, meet all their basic needs so they can stop worrying about that,” Loon said. “Then they can start to think about what they want for themselves and what their future might look like.”

Most residents will stay an average of three to four months while gaining skills to live on their own, she said.

Loon says faith and civic organizations, foundations and government pushed to create Brooklyn Avenues. She hopes the model will catch on in other Twin Cities suburbs.

“Their collective goal is to create a safe place for their kids so that they can stay in their community, continue to go to school, get the support they need and remain community members here instead of having to leave and go to the city to get their help,” she said.

Reported by Sasha Aslanian / MPR News / January 30, 2015

Link to online article

+  LHB Licensure and New Staff, January 20, 2015

LHB Licensure and New Staff

January 20, 2015

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (January 20, 2015) – Jordan Cabak received his Professional Engineer license in Civil Engineering from the State of Minnesota. Jordan joined LHB in 2013 and offices out of Minneapolis. He is currently involved with the Knollwood Mall Central Mall Redevelopment project in St. Louis Park and the Firemen’s Park project in Chaska.

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LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth, Minneapolis, and Superior, WI offices:

Troy Miller joins the Minneapolis Office as an Education Focus Leader for the Integrated Building Design Group. Troy is an architect and Registered Education Facility Planner Professional (REFP) with over 31 years of experience. Prior to joining LHB, Troy established the multi-discipline design firm Vedi Design Group, PLLC which provided architecture and engineering (mechanical, electrical, and structural) services.

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Dylan Mattson joins the Duluth Office as a Mechanical Designer for the Pipeline Group. Dylan is currently attending the University of Minnesota – Duluth pursing a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and has worked as an intern at LHB since 2012.

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Rob Downs III joins as a Contract Administrator for the Pipeline Group and will office from LHB’s Duluth and Superior locations. Rob has extensive experience in scheduling and managing the construction of pipelines. He graduated from The College of St. Scholastica with a degree in Business Management. Since 2002, Rob has been coaching the Superior High School Varsity Hockey team.

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Ashley Norman joins the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Ashley graduated from Lake Superior College with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Civil Engineering Technology. Ashley gives back to the community as a Head Coach for the Duluth East JV Softball team.

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Michael Koberstein joins the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Michael is a graduate of Lake Superior College with a Power Limited Certificate and multiple Associate of Applied Science degrees in Electronic Engineering Technology – Industrial Controls; Electronic Engineering Technology-Wireless Communications; and Commercial and Residential Wiring.

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Dirk Gaynor was hired in November 2014 as an intern and accepted a full time position with the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Dirk graduated from Dakota County Technical College in December with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Civil Engineering Technology.

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Brandon Skaudis joins the Duluth Office LLC. Brandon will be a Technician at the Minnesota Power Herbert Service Center. He has a Diploma in Electrical Industrial Automation Technology from Mesabi Range Technical & Community College.

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+  Minnesota’s Sustainable Building 2030 ..., January 14, 2015

Minnesota’s Sustainable Building 2030 Carbon Reduction Goal is 70% as of January 1, 2015

January 14, 2015

Minnesota’s Sustainable Building 2030 Carbon Reduction Goal is 70% as of January 1, 2015

The state of Minnesota is leading the nation in requiring 70% more energy efficient state buildings in an effort to have all state construction carbon neutral by 2030. Designed to increase energy efficiency and sustainability, the State of Minnesota’s Buildings, Benchmarks, and Beyond (B3) programs were developed for and are required on State-funded projects in Minnesota. Minnesota’s Sustainable Building 2030 (SB 2030) Energy Standard is a progressive energy conservation program within B3 that sets specific performance targets for energy use in buildings. Every five years, the total carbon emissions target from building energy is reduced so that in 2030 the goal of 100% reduction (net zero carbon) is achieved. The program began with the requirement for SB 2030 buildings to be designed and operated with a 60% carbon reduction compared to representative buildings in existence in 2003. State-funded projects that begin schematic design on or after January 1, 2015 will now achieve an even greater energy and carbon reduction of 70%.

The SB 2030 program has established cost-effective energy-efficiency performance standards for new and substantially reconstructed commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by lowering energy use.

Major accomplishments of the SB2030 initiative include:

  • 78 buildings designed to the SB 2030 Energy Standard (60%) are predicted to save approximately 490 million kBtus/year;
  • Buildings designed to the SB 2030 Energy Standard (60%) are predicted to save approximately $7.04 million per year assuming an average cost of $14.35 per kBtu;
  • Buildings designed to the SB 2030 Energy Standard (60%) anticipate a reduction in carbon emissions of 53,000 tons of CO2e annually.

For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Richard Graves or visit www.b3mn.org.

Press release posted by SB 2030

Contact: Richard Graves
Director and Associate Professor
Center for Sustainable Building Research
University of Minnesota
612.626.8783
rmgraves@umn.edu

 

# # #

+  LHB Announces New Shareholder, January 8, 2015

LHB Announces New Shareholder

January 8, 2015

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce that Maureen Colburn, Architectural Project Manager has been elected as an LHB Shareholder.

Maureen Colburn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CDT, has contributed significantly to LHB’s high performance design initiatives in the 11 years she has been with the company. She has over 16 years of architectural experience managing and designing a variety of projects ranging from supportive housing and residence halls to innovative research studies. Maureen’s notable projects include the LEED Gold Certified Cassat and James Student Residences at Carleton College, Center City Housing’s San Marco Apartments, UofM Morris’s Green Prairie Living & Learning Center, and Aeon’s historic LEED Gold Certified Renaissance Box Housing which also received a 2013 AIA Affordable Housing Design Award.

Maureen’s sustainable policy and research work includes the State of Minnesota Sustainable Buildings 2030 (SB2030) guidelines, Regional Indicators Initiative (RII), and LHB’s Performance MetricsTM. She has specific expertise in leading project teams, LEED/B3 documentation, and specification writing Maureen received a 2011 AIA Minnesota Young Architect Award for her exceptional leadership in service to the profession, the community, design, planning, and educating others. She also received the 2004 AIA Minnesota Presidential Award for her work on Climate Change Policy. Maureen is a past chair of the AIA Minnesota Committee on the Environment and Architecture for Humanity Minnesota. She currently co-chairs the AIA Minnesota Women in Architecture Committee and facilitates the Minneapolis-St. Paul Living Building Challenge Collaborative.


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+  Nicollet block developers roll out new d..., December 31, 2014

Nicollet block developers roll out new depictions

December 31, 2014

A drab parking lot in downtown Minneapolis has been thrust under the runway spotlight.

Firms bidding to develop the old Nicollet Hotel block are working through the holiday season to produce new renderings that depict their ideas for transforming it. They hope to influence public opinion for an ambitious makeover of a site now owned by the city of Minneapolis.

The block, named after the Nicollet Hotel that stood there until 1991, is situated between 3rd Street, Washington Avenue N., Hennepin Avenue S. and Nicollet Mall. When city officials closed the bidding period for the site earlier this month, four private developers released their plans, creating a windfall of responses from the community.

“Most developments you hear about involve a developer who already owns the property. So once the original news comes out, they just get busy,” said Herb Tousley, head of the real estate programs at the University of St. Thomas. “But when there’s a selection process involved, you tend to hear more about it in advance because people are trying to position themselves to get picked.”

Bloomington-based United Properties on Monday released two new images of the 36-story, mixed-use tower it proposes for the block.

Its initial rendering showed a white outline in the general shape of two conjoined buildings, slightly off-center from each other. The new images depict a glassy structure as seen from the street on Hennepin as well as an aerial view providing textures, colors and integration of a proposed streetcar system.

“The architects really wanted to give more emphasis and enhance the streetscape,” said Jessie Timmerman, spokeswoman for United. “It’s not just about the tower. Of course that’s the excitement, but [the new drawings show] how this relates to the average person as they approach it and how that will feel on the ground.”

Golden Valley-based Mortenson on Monday also released new images of its proposal for a 31-story tower. The new depictions focus on street-level activity that the firm believes its design would facilitate.

The lower, glass atrium-like office building as well as public programming are further imagined from a pedestrian’s vantage. But perhaps most unique is the prominence of a floating, ethereal art installment that’s seen in close-up and faraway shots.

Duval Development, based in Minneapolis, seized public attention by proposing an 80-story tower that would be 100 feet taller than the IDS Center, Minnesota’s tallest structure. Duval released another image last week showcasing the reflective nature of the building’s exterior and weaving footpaths among the tower’s public spaces.

Minneapolis-based Doran Development has not released new images since the initial news hit, but did publish three detailed images at the time of its cylindrical, 30-story tower and surrounding public space.

If city leaders are right and they get their way, the site is poised to be transformed into a bustling interchange.

City staff will review the four plans and conduct community outreach. The City Council is expected to select one of the developers by April and sell the property by late summer 2015. Construction would begin in early to mid-2016.

Developers “want to get their vision out in the public because it sounds like it’s going to be a somewhat public process,” Tousley said.

Article by: KRISTEN LEIGH PAINTER , Star Tribune

Updated: December 30, 2014 – 8:45 AM


South HennepinRevised_lowres

 

+  LHB’s David Booth Receives AIA-St. Pau..., December 11, 2014

LHB’s David Booth Receives AIA-St. Paul Honorable Mention

December 11, 2014

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (December 11, 2014) – LHB’s David Booth, Assoc. AIA, received an honorable mention from the St. Paul chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) for The St. Paul Prize Design Competition. The annual competition is for emerging professionals to develop innovative ideas for programming, designing, occupying, and perceiving public space.

For more information on the competition http://www.aia-mn.org/2014-st-paul-prize-design-competition/.

David teamed with Samantha Schultz, Assoc. AIA (Meyer Group) to create an Outdoor Education and Community Space for an existing site in the Midway District of St. Paul. The 2.44 acre site is located in a nondescript urban area with a mix of retail, warehouse, office, and parking lot spaces.

David is an Architectural Designer in the Integrated Building Design Group out of the Duluth office. His work focuses primarily on commercial and government projects. He is a graduate of North Dakota State University with a Master of Architecture Degree, and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Environmental Design. David has been with LHB since 2013 and has four years of experience.


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+  LHB New Staff and Promotions, December 2, 2014

LHB New Staff and Promotions

December 2, 2014

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (December 2, 2014) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

John Lawless joins the Corporate Office as a Safety Specialist with over 15 years of experience helping companies identify loss exposures by analyzing risks and recommending controls. He received his Master of Industrial Safety Degree with an emphasis in Industrial Hygiene from the University of Minnesota Duluth. A licensed Firefighter and Certified Emergency Medical Technician in Minnesota, John is also the Deputy Chief with the Hermantown Volunteer Fire Department.

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Chris Bach joins the Minneapolis Office as an Architectural Designer for the Integrated Building Design Group. Chris is an accredited LEED Green Associate with nine years of experience. Chris received his Master’s Degree in Architecture from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

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Megan Atkinson joins the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Megan is a recent graduate from Lake Superior College with a degree in Civil Engineering Technology.

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Dirk Gaynor joins the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Dirk is currently attending Dakota County Technical College for Civil Engineering Technology.

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Benjamin Youngren joins the Corporate Office as an Accountant with the Finance Group. Benjamin brings over five years of experience and received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance from Northwestern College in St. Paul, MN, and completed the US Army, Officer Candidate School and Armor Basic Officer Leadership Course. Benjamin serves as a 2nd Lieutenant and Scout Platoon Leader for the U.S. Army, MnARNG out of Cloquet, Minnesota.

BKY_Ben_K_Youngren_PR


TSD_Tony_Derrick_PRCNF_Cassie_FuldaTony Derrick and Cassie Fulda were both promoted to the role of Permit Specialist. Cassie and Tony are certified Right of Way Agents with the International Right of Way Association (IRWA). The IRWA is a non-profit association who provides its 10,000 members with professional development, and promotes strong ethics and improved service to employers and the public, along with advancements within the right of way profession.

 

+  LHB Recognized by Architectural Record a..., October 24, 2014

LHB Recognized by Architectural Record and The Zweig Group Hot Firm List

October 24, 2014

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN, and Superior, WI (October 24, 2014) – LHB ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural firms in the nation by Architectural Record and as a 2014 Hot Firm by Zweig Group.

LHB placed No. 221 on Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List and No. 50 on The Zweig Group Hot Firm List.

Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List ranks companies by revenue (in millions of dollars) for architectural services only. http://archrecord.construction.com/practice/top300/2014/top300-architecture-firms-5.asp

In an industry comprised of over 100,000 firms, LHB was recognized on The Zweig Group Hot Firm List as one of the 100 fastest-growing firms in the United States and Canada. Placement is based on a firm’s percentage of revenue growth and dollar revenue growth over a three-year period. https://zweiggroup.com/awards/the-zweig-letter-hot-firm-list/2014_winners.php


Bill Bennett receiving the 2014 Hot Firm Award

Bill Bennett receiving the 2014 Hot Firm Award

+  LHB’s Stine Presenting at Internationa..., October 17, 2014

LHB’s Stine Presenting at International Revit® Technology Conference

October 17, 2014

LHB’s Daniel Stine will speak at the Revit Technology Conference (RTC) in Dublin, Ireland. An expert in 3D building information modeling (BIM) software, Daniel will be presenting three sessions at this international conference: 1) Lighting Analysis in Autodesk® Revit, 2) Managing Remodels and Alternates in Autodesk® Revit and 3) Design Validation and Animations using Autodesk® Showcase. Daniel Stine has presented multiple sessions at each of the four RTC North America events.

The second European Revit Technology Conference will be held at the Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland from 30 October – 1 November 2014. The conference provides attendees with the opportunity to learn from some of the world’s top instructors and industry experts, share ideas and insights with an international community of peers, and explore the latest trends and technologies. Revit is a parametric 3D modeling and information management software being widely adopted by AEC firms worldwide. For more information see http://rtcevents.cvent.com/events/rtc-europe-2014/event-summary-aea0d509120549508f87d75e683774cb.aspx.

Daniel Stine, CSI, CDT is an author, instructor, BIM manager, and architect with 23 years of experience. He has spoken at past RTC events since 2011, and was rated one of the Top 10 Speakers at the RTC USA 2012 Conference. Working full-time at LHB, Daniel provides training and support for all disciplines of Autodesk® Revit® (Architecture, Structure and MEP), AutoCAD® Civil 3D®, and AutoCAD. Daniel is a member of the Autodesk Developer Network and an Autodesk Revit Architecture 2011 Certified Professional. He has taught AutoCAD and Revit classes for 12 years at Lake Superior College (LSC), and currently teaches BIM to architecture and interior design students at North Dakota State University (NDSU). Leveraging his professional experience, Daniel has also written the following textbooks: Interior Design using Autodesk® Revit 2015, Design Integration using Autodesk® Revit 2015 (Architecture, Structure and MEP), Architectural Commercial Design using Autodesk® Revit 2015, Residential Design using Autodesk® Revit 2015, Residential Design using Autodesk® AutoCAD 2015, Commercial Design using AutoCAD 2013, Chapters in Architectural Drawing; Hand Sketching in a Digital World, Hand Sketching, Adobe Photoshop and Google SketchUp for Interior Designers and SketchUp 2013 for Interior Designers.

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+  LHB Announces New Staff, October 16, 2014

LHB Announces New Staff

October 16, 2014

LHB, Inc. is also pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Nathan Fox joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Project Manager for the Public Works Group. Nathan has over 15 years of experience as a project manager and estimator with extensive multi-industry experience with a proven track record of completing multi-million dollar construction projects safely, on time, and under budget.

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Mike Koberstein joins the Duluth Office as a Technician for the Pipeline Group. Mike has over three years of experience as a drafting technician. Mike is currently enrolled at Lake Superior College in the Drafting Program.

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+  New Performance section on LHB’s websi..., October 15, 2014

New Performance section on LHB’s website!

October 15, 2014

+  Performance By Design, October 7, 2014

Performance By Design

October 7, 2014

With a New Superior Office and Growing Wisconsin Workforce,  LHB Continues Building With its Longtime Entrepreneurial Spirit

It is a theme that resonates with all LHB team members – “Always maintain an entrepreneurial spirit.”

That very philosophy has kept Chief Executive Officer Bill Bennett at the award-winning engineering, architecture and planning firm for decades.

“It’s easy to be proud of LHB’s story,” Bennett said. “We have organically grown, adding new disciplines along the way. If one of our team members has an idea or an area they want to explore and it’s grounded and well thought out, we encourage it 100 percent. We don’t hover.”

Because of this willingness to think outside the corporate box, the company has grown from one person in 1966 to seven people in 1980 to more than 250 today. Recognizing the importance of future workforce for continued growth, it has also brought on about 15 interns each year. Providing challenging, rewarding careers helps the Twin Ports area attract educated – and motivated – young professionals. With this growth, LHB (which has offices in Duluth and Minneapolis) recently opened a new office in Superior at 63 E. Second St., Suite 150.

“This is kind of coming home for us. LHB has designed numerous buildings and infrastructure in Wisconsin.”
– Chief Executive Officer Bill Bennett

“We opened the office in Superior to accommodate our expanding client base and staff in Wisconsin,” Bennett said. He noted that 15 percent of LHB’s staff resides in Wisconsin and many of its clients are based in Wisconsin.

“This is kind of coming home for us,” he said. “LHB has designed numerous buildings and infrastructure in Wisconsin and we even chose an office space in the same neighborhood as the Richard I. Bong Memorial Center, of which LHB was a part of the design team. We used to have an office in Superior and we have done a lot of work here. We have a rich history here.”

Indeed, Mike Fischer, senior vice president of the Minneapolis branch, worked in the Superior office in the ’90s and credits the city’s business leaders and residents with helping to form his career. He was involved in the Bong Heritage Center project, Barker’s Island master plan, City of Superior/Douglas County Metro Center, various Superior Housing Authority projects, early planning of the Tower Avenue redevelopment project and UW-Superior’s Ross and Hawkes residence halls. He also served as a city councilor.

“It was huge part of my life,” he said. “I was the city council president at one time and I went through the Superior-Douglas County Leadership Program and learned so much there. Superior is an incredible community with people who will roll up their sleeves and get to work. It is this experience and history that has led me to where I am today.”

“Superior is an incredible community with people who will roll up their sleeves and get to work.”
– Senior Vice President Mike Fischer, Minneapolis office

LHB was founded in Duluth in 1966 as Larsen, Harvala and Berquist (hence the LHB). One of its first projects was led by the company’s founder, Lauren Larsen, who worked on the Duluth Arena (now the Duluth Entertainment and Convention Center). Almost 50 years later, LHB still works with that client.

“From its inception, we have focused on good partnerships, long relationships and growing our disciplines,” Bennett said. This, he noted, has led to the company’s unique balance between engineering and architecture.

Although founded as a structural engineering firm, LHB quickly expanded to include civil, mechanical and electrical engineers and architects. In addition, the company brought in landscape architects, interior designers and land surveyors. The team is made up of experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, health care, government, education and commercial design and is also dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long-term operating costs and improving the quality of life for its clients.

“As a company, we choose to define ‘sustainable design’ in a more detailed way that is more meaningful to our employees and clients by using the term ‘high performance.’ Because of our diversity, we can be design leaders and push the envelope on implementing high-performance design,” Bennett said. “Sustainability means different things to different people, and we endeavor to determine what it means to that specific client early on in the project design process. Are operating costs and performance more important that initial capital cost? How important are environmental considerations? What payback period is acceptable to them in making decisions on high performance? We attempt to clearly understand the individual company’s desires before we begin a project.”

With energy costs always increasing, efficient energy management can drive a client’s ability to invest in and expand facilities, Bennett said. While the end result should save clients energy and lower costs, having clear, time-saving project management is imperative to the overall budget as well. LHB project managers have an average of 20 years of real world experience. “We know that great projects are built on comprehensive, realistic designs, attention to detail and a commitment to doing it right the first time,” Bennett said.

That sentiment is seconded by Director of Facilities Tom Fennessey of the University of Wisconsin-Superior, who said LHB clearly understands the university’s goals when working on its projects.

“UW-Superior has used the services of LHB for numerous campus improvement projects for well over 20 years,” he said. “Projects consisted of master planning, pedestrian and vehicle traffic improvements, classroom upgrades, new building designs, utility upgrades, landscaping designs and others. Their multi-disciplined services of architecture, engineering and construction management have been a nice one-stop shop for needed services.

“LHB’s familiarity with UW-Superior, their desire to understand us and our unique needs and their commitment to the region has been an asset to the campus,” Fennessey said. “Their experience and understanding of the needs of higher education has allowed UW-Superior to plan, design and complete projects that meet the needs of the student today and well into the future.”

“UW-Superior has used the services of LHB for numerous campus improvement projects for well over 20 years.”
– Director of Facilities Tom Fennessey, University of Wisconsin-Superior

Along with working with UW-Superior, LHB has been involved with many other educational projects, including: planning with the Superior School District; Maple School District’s Elementary, Middle and Northwestern High School additions and renovations; Carleton College’s residence halls; Normandale Community College’s Kopp Student Union renovation; Lake Superior College’s Academic Student Center and Health & Science Center; University of Minnesota Duluth’s Life Science Building renovation; Duluth School District’s Lincoln Park Middle School and Ordean East Middle School; Lake Superior School District’s Two Harbors High School; and Mahtomedi School District’s Wildwood Elementary School.

According to Education Focus Leader Kevin Holm, LHB strives to create optimal learning environments first and foremost when working on all educational projects. He is currently working with the Superior School District, UW-Superior and the Maple School District. He also opened his own business in Superior called Superior Sands.

“Education design is about creating ideal places where young people grow, learn and become who they want to be,” Holm said. “Education has changed for the better over the years and technology has changed the playing field. Collaboration in small groups and student presentations are replacing memorization and lecture-style delivery. Education facilities must be designed for those changes, while providing safe social interaction and giving students an inspirational setting in which to learn and imagine.”

LHB also applies that same philosophy when creating high-performance workplaces. The firm understands that the environment where businesses plan, produce, store, distribute or sell their products is critical to their success. LHB designs allow teams to work efficiently and effectively by creating engaging, healthy and safe workplaces that will attract and retain quality employees and clearly state the business’s brand, while using the client’s dollars wisely.

LHB applies this principle when working on government projects and health care as well. Some of these projects include: Essentia Health-St. Mary’s Hospital of Superior pain medicine, cardiac and chapel rooms; Superior/Douglas County Metro Center; Superior Public Library; Fairlawn Mansion and Museum restoration; the City of Duluth Police Headquarters; Duluth Transit Authority Multimodal Transportation Center; the St. Louis County Sheriff’s Department/911 facility; Brainerd Lakes Heart and Vascular Center; Duluth Children’s Hospital; Duluth Clinic Eye Department; and St. Mary’s Medical Center pharmacy.

“We make wise use of public dollars,” Bennett said. “We explore what a client currently has and where they’re going in order to create a facility that improves workflow now and adapts for future growth.”

LHB recognizes the importance of working with physicians, hospital staff and administrators when designing health care projects. The firm consults with user groups, staff and facility committees to determine the vision for the project and the needs of the individuals who will be using it. This approach can minimize costly changes late in the project and ensures that all options have been considered.

LHB has also partnered with for-profit and nonprofit housing developers on renovation or new construction projects. The more than 3,000 of these projects on its resume add up to a total of  $170 million in the region and represents a broad range of projects including townhomes, condominiums, apartment buildings, supportive housing, senior living, student residence halls and mixed-use developments.

“Our structure is such that we can provide architectural services specializing in housing design with the benefits of a consistent team of in-house landscape architects and civil and structural engineers,” Bennett said. “Through this integrated design approach, we can offer our clients opportunities to incorporate elements of high-performance design into each project.”

LHB’s housing team was awarded the 2013 Affordable Housing Design Award from AIA Minnesota and The McKnight Foundation for the Renaissance Box project in St. Paul.

LHB is also highly in demand for its pipeline engineering services, according to Pipeline Focus Leader Dan Heldt, who oversaw the establishment of LHB’s Superior office and is in charge of its daily operations. Currently, he is working with Enbridge.

“We recognized the demand for this niche in the 1990s, and again, LHB was willing to have an entrepreneurial spirit and let us put together an A-team for our region,” Heldt said. “Prior to that, people would hire firms from as far away as Tulsa and Houston. Now, clients here can call us and we can meet with them in person that day or the next day and get moving, instead of waiting in line to work with a company from out of state.”

“We provide good jobs to area graduates who already know and love this region.”
– Pipeline Focus Leader Dan Heldt

LHB also provides promising employment for students from area educational institutions, according to Heldt.

“Not every engineer from areas like Tulsa or Houston would want to relocate to this climate,” he said. “We provide good jobs to area graduates who already know and love this region.”

LHB pipeline and utility projects include: the American Transmission Co.’s 220-mile Arrowhead-Weston power line connecting Duluth with Wausau, Wis., designed to accommodate electric load growth in northern Wisconsin; Enbridge’s pipeline system expansion from Superior to Mokena, Ill.; the Southern Lights Streator to Manhattan pipeline project from Manhattan, Ill., to Streator, Ill., and Southern Access Pipeline expansion projects; the City of Duluth’s West Leg gas main; and the Indianapolis-to-Chicago Williams Fiber Optic Cable project.

The firm works hard to stay ahead of the learning curve on developments in oil, water and gas pipelines, pump houses and switchgear buildings, maps and surveys and fiber optic lines. Its engineers and survey teams are committed to understanding their clients’ industries and being resources to answer questions.

LHB is known in the industry for its public works projects as well, including analyses and design work on: the Blatnik Bridge; Barker’s Island master planning upgrades; Center City Park; City of Superior gateway signage; Second Street reconstruction in Duluth; City of Duluth Seven Bridges and Road reconstructions; the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center’s parking structure; the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ Gitchi-Gami State Trail from Schroeder to Tofte, Minn.; the Sturgeon Lake Wastewater Treatment Facility sanitary collection ponds and water tower; and the Highway 53/Piedmont Avenue reconstruction.

Bennett said the firm is well aware that successful infrastructure and site development projects should fit their communities and function well within the surrounding environment. LHB team members consider all of the technical aspects of a client’s project and bring cost-effective solutions to improve the quality of life in the entire community. The firm also understands the regulatory aspect of construction and can handle the permitting process that goes along with it. By having civil and structural engineers, surveyors and landscape architects all in-house, the firm assigns clients a single point of contact to coordinate the progress of a project, so clients do not need to make multiple phone calls.

“We recognize the importance of working with the community and stakeholders in our projects,” Bennett said. “We listen to feedback. We’re invested in the communities where we work and enjoy being a resource before, during and after projects are completed.”

According to Duluth-Superior Market President Michael Colclough of BMO Harris Bank, LHB is indeed a stellar community member and supporter.

“The office in Superior is a great addition; the firm has always had a market presence here and the new office location solidifies this,” he said. “LHB employees are active in the community, and any board or organization I have worked with usually has someone from LHB involved. Having an office in Superior can only be a good thing for us. They are a great firm to work with. The culture of collaboration pervades the company. I typically work with them on banking needs and we
always have an open dialogue, which helps uncover what works for both LHB and BMO Harris Bank. Their employees have a high level of expertise and are consummate professionals.”

Through the years, LHB has won numerous awards for its work in the region. But today, its CEO is probably most proud of being named one of the Top 100 fastest growing engineering and architectural design firms in the nation two years in a row.

“It is gratifying that I find I can’t walk a block in the Twin Ports without seeing a building or a project that we have either designed or been involved with on some level,” Bennett said. “We can’t help but be proud of that.”

As for the future, Bennett believes there is only good ahead.

“We all suffered from the economy following 2008, and when one business doesn’t do well there’s an impact on other businesses in that region, so that’s why we always try to do business locally,” he said. “But because we have diversified, we can count on having different aspects of our business do well at different times. It is an element of our business that helps keep us stable. We’re optimistic about the future of the Twin Ports and LHB.” P.S.

Holly Kelsey-Henry is a freelance writer based in Northwest Wisconsin.

+  Chaska’s Firemen’s Park plan..., September 30, 2014

Chaska’s Firemen’s Park plan moves ahead

September 30, 2014

The redesigned park will include a Crooked Pint Ale House, a curling center and a banquet facility.

Plans for an ambitious redevelopment of Firemen’s Park in Chaska — expanding and improving its amenities, linking it to another smaller park and to the city’s historic downtown — are moving forward.

The city hopes to begin work in November on the $15 million project, which includes a new building that will house a Crooked Pint Ale House, a 300-seat banquet facility and a curling center with six ice sheets.

The City Council recently reviewed plans at a work session. The project already has been approved by the Parks Board and is expected to be considered by the Planning Commission later this month.

Some details of the project are on the city’s website. Council Member Jay Rohe said the reaction from residents has been “overwhelmingly positive.”

City Administrator Matt Podhradsky agreed. “I think it’s clearly a project the people of Chaska will be proud of,” he said.

Tom Redman, director of parks and recreation, told the council that goals for the redevelopment began taking shape almost a year ago. They include enhancing existing park features like the swimming beach, fishing docks and trail connections. Fishing opportunities will be expanded along a promenade and on a new bridge that will span the lake between Firemen’s Park and Schimelpfenig Park. Together the two parks comprise almost 30 acres.

Another goal is that the redeveloped park continues to embrace Chaska’s heritage as a former center for the brickmaking industry and honor the town’s firefighters, who helped develop the park in the 1950s.

The lake that sits between the two parks originally was a clayhole where clay was mined for brickmaking. Gathering spaces sprinkled throughout the park will resemble giant kilns.

Brick resembling cream-colored Chaska brick will be among the materials for the 40,000-square-foot building that will house the Crooked Pint, curling rink and event center. “We’re going to try to use it as expressively as we can,” said Mark Wentzell of 292 Design Group, the project’s architect.

Redman said the city chose Crooked Pint from two restaurant operators that responded to queries sent out to several prospects. The other response was from Gabes in the Park, which has a bar and grill at Fogerty Arena in Blaine, home of the Four Seasons Curling Club. The Park Board interviewed both companies and recommended to the council that it move forward with Crooked Pint, Redman said.

Launched in 2011 by St. Paul-based Green Mill Restaurants, Crooked Pint has a pub-style format featuring dozens of tap beers. The Chaska restaurant will be the third location for the business — other outlets are on Washington Avenue S. in Minneapolis and Apple Valley.

The restaurant will lease its space in Chaska, with indoor seating for about 200 and an outdoor patio that can accommodate 60 to 90 patrons. Green Mill has extensive experience in special-event catering and will oversee those operations for the banquet facility, said Paul Dzubnar, Green Mill/Crooked Pint’s CEO.

“We’re very excited about this opportunity,” he said. “We love Chaska’s old-school downtown. It’s a community with more than 23,000 people, and we really don’t have anything else out in that area.”

The building also will have a welcome hall with display space for historical artifacts, including a historic fire department bell.

Just north of the new building, four columns with an abstract design resembling ladders will be erected. They will be inscribed with the names of Chaska firefighters.

Landscaping will follow a “smoke and fire” motif, both in the shape of plants and their fall colors, said Michael Schroeder, landscape architect with Minneapolis-based LHB.

Council members asked Schroeder if any steps are being taken to keep geese — and their droppings — off wide expanses of green space. He said tall grasses will be planted around the lake, hopefully keeping more of the birds in the water.

“Or you could move the archery range,” joked Council Member Greg Boe.

Article by: SUSAN FEYDER , Star Tribune

  • Updated: September 30, 2014 – 2:53 PM

 

+  Unique Minnesota data project illuminate..., September 23, 2014

Unique Minnesota data project illuminates cities’ energy use

September 23, 2014

A unique data project in Minnesota is giving city leaders a clearer picture of how their residents use energy.

For instance, conventional wisdom would suggest that densely populated Minneapolis and St. Paul would use the least energy per capita in the Twin Cities metro area.

However, it’s actually Hopkins, an inner-ring suburb near Minneapolis, followed by Falcon Heights, a small burg on the edge of St. Paul, that take the top spots (the most energy-intensive is Lake Elmo, a largely rural exurban community).

That’s the kind of micro-data on Duluth, Rochester and 20 Twin Cities communities that can be found on the Regional Indicators Initiative (RII) website. The RII offers data on energy, water, waste, vehicle miles traveled and global greenhouse gases.

No other urban area in the country has anything like the RII, said Rick Carter, who oversees the program and is senior vice-president of LHB, Inc.’s Minneapolis office.

“Many communities around the world have done something like this, but in terms of doing a whole community like this or set of cities, we haven’t found anything like it,” he said.

Phillip Muessig, co-director of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s Greenstep Cities program, said the RII reveals accurate data can now be captured at the community level and displayed in a way policymakers and citizens can understand.

“I think that the fact you can show the data and make it interesting makes people look at it and think ‘wow, that’s pretty cool,’” he said. “Only a few big cities have ever had anything like this before.”

One user has been Peter Lindstrom, mayor of Falcon Heights (pop. 5,300). He likes that the data can be parsed into commercial/industrial and residential because he has two large enterprises in the city — the Minnesota State Fair and the University of Minnesota’s St. Paul campus.

“Those two enormous institutions are energy and water hogs,” he said. “If we were not able to break out between residential and commercial/industrial it would be hard to know if our programs were making a difference or not.”

No Falcon Heights council meeting passes without representatives comparing the city to others in terms of property taxes or sanitary fees, Lindstrom said. The RII allows the council to look at sustainability, too, and how Falcon Heights compares.

“I am a huge fan of the Regional Indicators Initiative,” he added. It’s been a tremendous asset for communities like ours, in general, and for Falcon Heights. It’s been helpful in a number of areas.”

Rolf Nordstrom, executive director of the Great Plains Institute, agrees that more detailed data will help cities understand whether they are moving in the right direction in meeting Minnesota’s goals for reducing carbon emissions, water use and waste.

“This kind of information is critically important,” said Nordstrom. “Minnesota has laws with a number of goals for reducing greenhouse gases by 80 percent by 2050. Without this kind of data how will be know if we’re getting better or worse?”

From idea to a website

RII began as a way to track the progress of communities participating in Minnesota’s GreenStep Cities program. GreenStep Cities agree to implement 28 best practices that will cut energy and water use, curtail waste, improve transit, water quality and other sustainability components.

The pilot launched in 2010 with the Twin Cities suburbs of St. Louis Park, Falcon Heights and Edina. By 2013 the RII broadened to 19 additional cities. The data stretches back to 2008 and comes from online resources, with energy data coming from utilities.

The full impact of the RII is yet to be seen, but Carter has high hopes.

“I think the biggest impact is the Met Council has created a policy directive on climate change and it is planning to incorporate mechanisms within the comprehensive plan for 2040 and its ‘Thrive MSP 2040′ process,” he said. “They have specifically referred to the Regional Indicators as a potential tool to use as a monitor.”

In terms of surprises, Carter said there have been few. Energy consumption decreased in 2008 to 2010, went back up over the next three years. The lower energy use was more of a result of the economy than energy consumption, he said.

“The amazingly wide range of water consumption from city to city surprised me — it ranges from under 40 gallons to over 110 [gallons per day],” he said. “Sometimes you wonder if something is wrong with the data but it’s accurate. That surprised me.”

Less surprising, though, the data show that the more dense a city, the lower the energy and water use and vehicle miles traveled by its residents.

“The more dense, the less consumptive,” Carter said.

Cities pay $500 a year to participate, and those dues cover a quarter of the cost of program. The Commerce Department, the PCA, the Urban Land Institute and the Great Plains Institute take care of the rest.

Next steps

In fact, the success of the RII may lead the GreenStep Cities program to add data collection as a fourth tier of recognition for cities. The Great Plains Institute’s Amir Nadav, who serves as co-director of GreenStep Cities, said the program offers three levels of achievement for communities as they meet sustainability goals.

The GreenStep Cities program offers a Step One  recognition for simply passing a city resolution to join the program. Step Two is triggered by adopting several four to eight practices while Step Three cities have to have deployed from 12 to 16. The number of best practices a city has to complete depends on its population. The Minnesota League of Cities recognizes GreenStep Cities at its annual June conference.

Another effort involves “reduction wedges” that communities could use to decrease greenhouse gases, water use and improve in other areas.

A wedge is created in RII when charting energy use, for example — the line showing energy use has generally risen while the state’s energy mandates call for that line to decline, said Muessig.

LHB is working on templates that cities could employ to determine how a particular strategy would impact their carbon emissions. If 25 percent of a city’s commercial businesses reduced energy consumption by 20 percent, the resulting carbon decline would be revealed by calculations available in the template, he said.

Communities would be able to select from a variety of wedges before deciding which to take action on.

“If a city is really going to decrease community carbon use how to you get there?” said Muessig. “You need some rough numbers before you sketch out a scenario. That’s really the end game, I think.”

A real example comes from Lindstrom, who said Falcon Heights instituted a consumption-based fee for sanitary sewer service rather than a flat fee and saw an 11 percent reduction in usage. Although the city tracked the decline, it also showed up in the data on the RII website, he said.

More immediately, the RII plans to add six other Minnesota cities, among them Mankato, St.  Cloud, and Bemidji, said Nadav. Their addition will add information on energy use and other sustainability measures in different parts of the state and in communities of varied sizes, he said.

The RII will likely be moved to the PCA or another state agency at some point in the future, Muessig noted. Ideally, the Metropolitan Council, a regional planning organization for the Twin Cities, could take it over and use the data to help guide its “Thrive” plan, which sets long-term sustainability goals for the metro area.

If that happens in next few years, the RII data could be used to help cities describe their sustainability efforts in the comprehensive plans they must submit to the council periodically.

“That would be spectacular,” he said.
Midwest Energy News | Posted on by

 

+  Finance & Commerce Top Projects: Wi..., August 13, 2014

Finance & Commerce Top Projects: Wildwood Elementary School

August 13, 2014

Address: 8698 75th St. N., Stillwater

Project cost: $20 million

Project size: 84,000 square feet

Owner: Mahtomedi Public Schools

Contractor: Kraus-Anderson

Architect: LHB Inc.

Engineer: Wunderlich-Malec Engineering (electrical), Strategic Solution Engineering (mechanical), Anderson-Johnson Associates (civil)

Editor’s note: This is the 11th installment in Finance & Commerce’s Top Projects of 2013 series. Read about other Top Projects here.

The original Wildwood Elementary School, built in 1951, had long hallways with classrooms on each side, an angular design and little natural light. But the Mahtomedi Public Schools wanted a more stimulating environment in a 21st century building.

Construction began on a new Wildwood Elementary in April 2012, and the result was a two-story, 84,000-square-foot school with terrazzo floor tile in swirling designs and other curvilinear features inside and out that suggest a river’s flow.

The intent was to stimulate kids rather than to keep them subdued, explained Kevin Holm, principal for architect LHB. “We introduced wood or warm wood colors beside the primary colors for warmth and energy,” Holm said. “The district wanted a safe place for kids with a whimsical, playful feel to it.”

A flock of entities had to weigh in on the design, including the cities of Mahtomedi and Grant, Washington County, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and three watershed districts, among others. But construction finished in June 2013 in time for the next academic year.

The school serves more than 600 pupils in kindergarten to the second grade as well as the 3- to 5-year-olds in partial- and full-day early childhood programs. Mahtomedi Superintendent Mark Larson said that having the early childhood programs on site allows an easier transition for younger children to kindergarten.

The new building is designed for maximum northern daylight, which is considered the best for classrooms, and minimum east or west light to cut down on the heat and glare. The surround sound system, which has distributed speakers in each classroom, saves teachers’ voices and helps hard-of-hearing or inattentive students to stay engaged.

Wildwood sits near a former brownfield site, which caused some initial controversy. But Larson explained that the school isn’t on the dump site (the athletic fields are), and 557 tons of soil were removed and replaced. The project was a finalist for a 2013 Minnesota ReScape Award for revitalizing formerly contaminated land.

“We did borings at several depths at numerous times, and the soil always tests fine,” Larson said. “We probably know more about [the site] than most people know about the land their homes are built on.”

Link to full article and slide show of images

By: Holly Dolezalek August 13, 2014 7:05 am


MahtomediPublicSchoolDistrict_WildwoodElementarySchool_100165_E02_G4

+  Finance & Commerce Top Projects: LH..., August 8, 2014

Finance & Commerce Top Projects: LHB Minneapolis Office

August 8, 2014

Address: 701 Washington Ave. N., Suite 200, Minneapolis

Project cost: $1.1 million

Project size: 13,830 square feet (excluding core and shell spaces)

Owner: LHB Inc.

Contractor: RJM Construction

Architect: LHB Inc.

Engineer: LHB Inc.

Editor’s note: This is the 10th installment in Finance & Commerce’s Top Projects of 2013 series. Read about other Top Projects here.

Minneapolis’ North Loop neighborhood is quickly becoming a desirable location for the city’s creative and professional types, thanks to the old but viable buildings there. The area turned out to be a perfect fit for LHB Inc., the Duluth-based engineering and architecture firm.

The firm wanted a vibrant environment for its 50 Minneapolis workers, but it also wanted a space that could serve as a design showcase for its Twin Cities commercial clients. LHB finally settled on the historic Loose-Wiles building.

“It took a lot of shopping around to find the space – years,” said project architect Bruce Cornwall of LHB. “We wanted to find the right place at the right rate, and to have it be a space that we could design to meet our growth needs.”

The Loose-Wiles building spent most of its 108-year history as the Sunshine Biscuit Co., the maker of Hydrox cookies and Cheez-It crackers. The original occupants conceived the space as a vibrant work environment with lots of natural light, a quality LHB was glad to keep.

Fortunately, the building’s concrete and primary structure were in good shape, and the exterior masonry offered nice detailing. While some tweaking was needed to bring the office up to the standard of a multitenant space, the building “has good bones,” according to Cornwall.

“One of the special things about the building is that even though it has a concrete frame, they have wood floors over the concrete,” he added. “So we get the benefits of the wood-warehouse kind of feel without any of the sound transfer that you’d get from a concrete floor.”

For the interior layout, LHB wanted the majority of the work spaces — including design areas and server rooms — to be visible and open. It also wanted an almost random order of placement when it came to cubicles and conference rooms, to suggest an anything-goes vibe to the company’s workflow.

“When you walk in the front door, the lobby is very open,” said Cornwall. “Anyone who comes in can see people working in the office. People are interested in the design process. We wanted to show people how the sausage is made.”

Link to full article and slide show of images

By: Dan Heilman August 8, 2014 7:05 am


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+  Fischer Wins Mayor’s Individual Servic..., July 31, 2014

Fischer Wins Mayor’s Individual Service Commendation

July 31, 2014

A resident committed to sound redevelopment is the recipient of the 2014 Mayor’s Individual Service Commendation.

Mayor James Hovland presented the award to Mike Fischer in late April. The Mayor bestows this honor annually to an individual for outstanding and exceptional volunteer service to the community at large.

“When I think of Mike, I think of a guy who has always been ready to serve his town whenever we’ve asked him for assistance,” said Hovland. “I can’t think of a better public servant than we’ve had in Mike Fischer over the years, and it was a real pleasure to be able to give him an award – and recognize all of that outstanding service to Edina over the years he was on the Planning Commission.”

Fischer served on Edina’s Planning Commission for nine years, serving two years as Chair. He also generously stepped out of “retirement” last year when another Commission member resigned and he agreed to fill the unexpired term.

As Chair of the Planning Commission, he led the effort to introduce Planned Unit Development to the Edina City Code and Sketch Plan Review into the City’s development review process.

“We’ve asked him for help because he is so good at what he does with land use. He’s always there; always willing to help – always provides great wisdom and advice,” said Hovland.

Community Development Director Cary Teague agrees with the Mayor. “Mike’s experience and expertise in the field of planning resulted in better projects for Edina during the time he served on the Planning Commission,” he said.

Fischer is quick to redirect praise to the City he loves. “I have consulted in hundreds of cities throughout my career, and have yet to find a better place than Edina for location, quality of schools, character of neighborhoods and quality of citizen volunteers,” he said.

Fischer has served on myriad committees and task forces for the City, including the Planning Commission (2004-2014), Comprehensive Plan Task Force (2006-2008), Edina Housing Task Force (2005-2006), Greater Southdale Area Land Use and Transportation Study (2004-2005) and Local Traffic Task Force (2002-2003).

When not volunteering his time in Edina, Fischer words as an architect and Senior Vice President at LHB, a 250-person architecture, engineering and planning firm located in Minneapolis and Duluth. He is also an expert in Tax Increment Finance (TIF) analysis, assisting cities with strategic planning for TIF districts.

He was one of four architects in the country to receive the AIA Young Architects Citation in 1997. He studied at MIT and Harvard, earned his master’s degree in City Planning and Real Estate Development from MIT and completed a two-year Bush Fellowship. Prior to his Bush Fellowship, he served as City Council President in Superior, Wisconsin, and Chair of the Duluth/Superior Metropolitan Planning Organization. He moved to Edina in 2000.

Fischer accepts his commendation with modesty. “I am so proud to call Edina home and am humbled to receive this recognition,” he said.

Fischer lives in the Cornelia Neighborhood with his wife, Laurie, their three children, and their dog, Lucky.

Mayor Hovland presented six commendations at the Volunteer Recognition Reception. He awarded the Mayor’s Service Club Commendation to the Edina Historical Society, and the Mayor’s Outstanding Senior Commendation to Sandy Phillips. Danzhen Lajia and Kyle Schwartz shared the honor of receiving the Mayor’s Youth Commendation, as did Mark Lawrence and Laurie Shimizu, when they took home the Mayor’s Connecting with Kids Commendation. Art Center General Manager Michael Frey earned the Mayor’s Community Involvement Commendation.

By Frank Petrovic (Article from the Edina quarterly booklet “About Town” )


MAF_Edina_Award_April_2014_cropped

+  Engineering Firms Expanding in Twin Port..., July 28, 2014

Engineering Firms Expanding in Twin Ports

July 28, 2014

Duluth and Superior are winning awards for the best places to live, and the Twin Ports economy is looking good as two engineering firms expand in both cities. Company leader say new offices opening on Friday mean more local jobs.

Just north of the Richard I. Bong Memorial Center they helped develop, LHB employees are celebrating their new office in Superior.

“I feel really good about this for us. This is kind of coming home for us,” CEO Bill Bennett says.

He says the company has designed buildings and roads for the University of Wisconsin Superior and other clients in Wisconsin. He hopes the expansion into Superior draws in more business and makes life easier for his employees.

“We have a lot of clients in the Wisconsin area, a lot of staff that actually live on the Wisconsin side, and it really is us trying to make sure we can best serve our clients across the Wisconsin line,” Bennett says.

He says LHB has 250 employees and nearly 100 of those jobs were added in the last two years.

“So we’ve been growing seriously in big ways, and this is really trying to broaden our footprint,” Bennett says.

The ribbon cutting should do just that, and Barr Engineering has the same idea for their new office in Canal Park.

“We’re really excited. The new space offers us A, the option to grow, and B, the option to better collaborate to serve our clients. We’re here to serve our clients needs on projects that we work on locally and around the world,” Office Coordinator Sheryl Filby Williams says.

She says Barr has just about doubled their staff in three years. Now 110 people work at the new office, and Filby Williams says she is proud to help turn polluted sites into economic drivers like the company did with the Clyde redevelopment.

“Nothing is more gratifying to me personally, as a scientist, than to work in the local community and bring other growth into the community,” Filby Williams says.

The engineering boom is still going with job openings available at both companies.

Link to online article

Updated: 07/25/2014 6:15 PM
Created: 07/25/2014 5:21 PM WDIO.com
By: Travis Dill
tdill@wdio.com

 

+  Duluth-based firm LHB opens up shop in S..., July 28, 2014

Duluth-based firm LHB opens up shop in Superior

July 28, 2014

It’s more good news for Duluth based LHB…an engineering and architecture firm. They are expanding!

The company has now opened an office in Superior on East Second Street.

This firm is no stranger to Superior.

They had an office there from 1989 to 1994.

LHB decided to open up shop again to best serve their clients on that side of the bridge.

Seven people will work in the office…with the potential to increase staff to twenty soon.

LHB officials say they are excited to be a part of the growth in Superior.

“It’s really good to see that momentum and they got strong leaders in place that want that to happen so those are things that add to decisions like businesses like ours to say gosh we really need to be there,” said Bill Bennett, LHB Chief Executive Officer.

L-H-B has hired 40 new employees in each of the last three years.

Link to online article

Written and posted to the web by Raeanna Marnati
rmarnati@kbjr.com

NNCNOW.com
Updated Jul 25, 2014 at 6:48 PM CDT

+  Staying in the ‘green’ pays ..., July 23, 2014

Staying in the ‘green’ pays off for Duluth firm

July 23, 2014

A growing number of Minnesota cities are using an innovative new website to be more green, and the company that developed that site is reaping its own rewards.

LHB Inc., a Duluth-based firm with an office in the Twin Cities, has made measuring energy efficiency and sustainability a top priority for the hundreds of commercial and residential projects the company has designed and engineered.

Several years ago, LHB began applying those same high standards to the cities that participate in the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s GreenStep Cities Program, which helps communities become more sustainable by reducing their consumption of natural resources, including energy and water.

While the program tracked which of its best practices the cities adopted, it didn’t have a way to evaluate how effective these strategies have been at actually making the city more sustainable.

Rick Carter, LHB’s executive vice president and a performance metrics expert, led the effort to collect, summarize and measure that data.

“How would the cities know if what they set out to accomplish by completing 14 out of the 28 Best Practices actually happened,” said Carter. “The answer was unclear.”

The solution was the Regional Indicators Initiative (http://regionalindicatorsmn.uli.org), a website that was initially launched in 2010, but was made available to the public last year with five years of data for 22 Minnesota communities, including Woodbury, Oakdale and Lake Elmo. LHB developed and manages the site in collaboration with the Urban Land Institute of Minnesota.

While this initiative is helping communities monitor their sustainability, the idea of measuring and tracking performance has helped LHB survive the Great Recession, and promises to help build revenues into the future.

“Architecture and construction companies got hit harder than almost anyone,” said Bill Bennett, LHB’s longtime CEO, noting that many companies failed to make it beyond the downturn.

Instead, LHB has thrived.

The company, which was founded in Duluth in 1966 with seven people, was the 45th fastest-growing design company in the nation last year. Since 2012, the company has grown from about 160 to 250 employees, mostly by adding employees in the engineering, energy and infrastructure sectors.

Funding for the Regional Indicators Initiative comes from the cities, which pay about $500 per city per year of data, Carter said, but there are other sources of income, including state agencies such as the Department of Commerce and the MPCA. Private nonprofits, including the Mc­Knight Foundation and Great Plains Institute, have provided support, as well.

Bennett and Carter say that the program has many intangible benefits.

The project regularly puts the company at the front of the room at various meetings, including the Regional Council of Mayors, city councils and environmental commissions in those 22 participating cities. The initiative also helps raise the company’s profile before the Metropolitan Council and among state senators, representatives and at national and regional conferences throughout the country.

“The High Performance focus, including the Regional Indicators Initiative, has helped us maintain a steady market in the architecture and building sectors,” Carter said.

StarTrib_RAC_EKT_ows_140571892546068

Article by: Jim Buchta , Star Tribune

Updated: July 19, 2014 – 4:21 PM

+  Rod Carew All-Star Field Dedication, July 22, 2014

Rod Carew All-Star Field Dedication

July 22, 2014

LHB provided design services for the Rod Carew All-Star Field located at the intersection of Marshall Street NE and St. Anthony Parkway in NE Minneapolis. The project included the design of entrance walkway and plaza. LHB also provided design services for the storm water system that treats all of the runoff which flows through the turf field system. The project was a part of Major League Baseball’s All-Star Legacy program, which makes donations to youth baseball programs in the area surrounding the city hosting each year’s All-Star game. A condensed schedule and contaminated soils provided opportunities for the design team to complete the project prior to the All-Star weekend.

Rod Carew was on hand for the dedication of the ball field named in honor of the Hall of Famer. The dedication took place on July 11th.

Link to the full MLB article: http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article/mlb/hall-of-famer-rod-carew-honored-with-field-dedication-in-minneapolis?ymd=20140712&content_id=84323912&vkey=news_mlb

 


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+  DTA Groundbreaking Ceremony Scheduled fo..., June 18, 2014

DTA Groundbreaking Ceremony Scheduled for Thursday, June 19th

June 18, 2014

The Duluth Transit Authority (DTA) will host a groundbreaking ceremony for the new Multimodal Transportation Center this Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. The event will take place in the lower parking lot behind the construction site. The construction site is located on Michigan Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenue West.

Construction of the DTA’s new $28 million-dollar Multimodal Transportation Center will begin immediately following the groundbreaking ceremony. DTA officials and Executives from the General Contractor, Mortenson Construction, and the Architectural Firm, LHB, will be on hand to answer questions about the project. It will take approximately 18 months to complete with a ribbon-cutting ceremony planned for December of 2015.

DTA General Manager, Dennis Jensen, believes that the Multimodal Transportation Center will have a major impact on public transit in our region and beyond. “This facility has been designed with users of public transportation, pedestrians and the biking community in mind. Plus, it adds to the connectivity between the downtown and the DECC,” Jensen stated. “We think that the new center is a nice fit to city’s development efforts and the attraction of the downtown as a place to work, shop and be entertained.” Jensen continued.

Mayor Don Ness will make opening remarks along with other community leaders. Refreshments will be provided. This event is FREE and open to the public.

If you would like more information on this press release or to schedule an interview with DTA General Manager, Dennis Jensen, please contact Heath Hickok, Director of Marketing, at the contact information listed above.

The DTA’s mission is to provide a public transit service that is safe, convenient, efficient and affordable. It has been providing reliable service to the Duluth area for more than 130 years. The DTA has over 150 employees and 63 buses that provide service throughout the Twin Ports. The DTA Operating Center is located at 2402 West Michigan Street, Duluth, MN 55806.

 

+  Energy-use data could help Minnesota cit..., June 17, 2014

Energy-use data could help Minnesota cities protect the environment

June 17, 2014

Minnesota cities are using information to help reduce their impact on the environment.

After signing up for a voluntary state-run program that helps them identify ways to be greener by recycling a wider variety of plastics, replacing old light bulbs with energy efficient LEDs and other measures, some cities have joined a program that helps track data — from water and energy use to greenhouse gas emissions.

The Regional Indicators Initiative aims to help cities figure out which environmental measures work.

Twenty-two cities representing a quarter of Minnesota’s population are turning to data through the initiative, a project funded by the state and the Urban Land Institute of Minnesota.

“It says, ‘All right, we have these best practices, now are they actually making a difference in your community, in your neighborhood?'” Falcon Heights Mayor Peter Lindstrom said. “Can we measure?”

The Twin Cities suburb of 5,000 installed solar panels on city hall and signed up for a discount program that makes solar panels more affordable for homeowners. Lindstrom said the city also is proud of its community garden and a new biking and walking path along Fairview Avenue.

“I think the worst thing any city can do is greenwashing — to say you’re making a difference but then not really making a difference at all,” he said. “So through the Regional Indicators Initiative, it’s going to tell us whether our programs are making a difference.”

The project has data from 2008 onward that include vehicle miles traveled, waste generation, water use, and the amount of electricity, natural gas and other fuel being used by everyone within city limits. The cities that signed up had to agree to make the data public, said Rick Carter, a Minneapolis architect who has been managing the project.

“And that kind of goes towards the idea that you can’t manage what you don’t measure,” Carter said. “If somebody’s not looking at the data, it doesn’t matter that you have it. And if everybody’s looking at the data, it’s better.”

Carter said that could lead to a little friendly competition among cities. Studies have shown that such information can work for homeowners. If their electricity bill shows how they’re doing in comparison to their neighbors, it will motivate them to use a little less next month.

“You naturally use less because we’re all a little bit naturally competitive and because you know,” Carter said. “The question of whether that scales up to a city remains to be seen.

But Minnesotans likely won’t see an all-out greenhouse gas war between cities because their emissions are highly dependent on what kinds of activities are going on within their borders. Some cities have factories and skyscrapers. Others are mostly residential. Some are dense, and others still have farmland.

Carissa Schively Slotterback, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School who studies topics like sustainable development and land use planning, said city-to-city comparisons are a real challenge.

“You really have to understand the individual community context — what’s going on there, what are the generators of greenhouse gas impacts and then what are the tools to actually affect the kinds of activities and generators that are going on there,” she said.

Schively Slotterback said cities have proven to be a good place to tackle the greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change because that’s where most people live and work. In a lot of cases, saving energy means saving money.

Cities will need several years of data to decide what new policies or actions will help them reach the next level of being green.

But their participation in such efforts is crucial, said Philipp Muessig, co-director of the GreenStep Cities program for the the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. The broader effort encourages cities to voluntarily reduce their impact on the environment.

“For the long-term deeper reductions we need to make in greenhouse gases, we have to have cities as partners,” he said. “Helping cities take deeper actions, we’re sort of at the beginning of doing this.”

MPRNews: Elizabeth Dunbar · ·

Link to online article and story audio

+  Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal..., June 13, 2014

Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal’s Top Architectural Firms List

June 13, 2014

LHB ranked #20 on the 2014 Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal’s Top Architectural Firms List.

+  LHB’s Research on National Stage, June 3, 2014

LHB’s Research on National Stage

June 3, 2014

Over the course of several years, LHB has been involved in two state programs with the aim of tracking consumption of natural resources with the ultimate goal of improving sustainability: together with the fifty-four campuses in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) Energy and Water Benchmarking Project, and alongside twenty Minnesota cities with the Regional Indicators Initiative (RII).

LHB Senior Vice President, Rick Carter, FAIA, LEED Fellow BD+C, has been instrumental in the success of these efforts and will be presenting on the findings and how they were used, offering examples of case studies, and demonstrating the link between measuring activity and improved performance at the upcoming World Environmental and Water Resources (EWRI) Congress in Portland, Oregon, sponsored by the American Society of Civil Engineers. This year’s EWRI congress, Water Without Borders: Sustainable Environmental and Water Resources Solutions for a World Without Borders, focuses on bringing together leading environmental and water resource professionals.

+  LHB Recognition and New Projects, May 19, 2014

LHB Recognition and New Projects

May 19, 2014

LHB received two Merit Awards at the 2014 ASLA-MN awards banquet for the Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard and the Minneapolis Community Technical College (MCTC) Fine Arts Plaza in the General Design category.

Hazelden is a nationally renowned addiction treatment organization that helps transform lives. Hazelden’s facilities are an essential part of the healing process for its clients. The Landscape Architect’s challenge was to transform one of the most important spaces at Hazelden, making it a direct part of the campus experience and setting the tone for the journey to recovery for their arriving clients. The design sought to welcome, soothe and delineate the experience for patients and families at the beginning steps of their journey to transform their lives.

The Fine Arts Plaza at MCTC erases the old division between the campus and the north corner of Loring Park by pulling down walls, opening up views, and bringing green space right up to the doors of the Fine Arts and Student Centers. Terraced gardens overflow with a soft palette of blue and lavender plants, complementing the linearity of the dark concrete seatwalls. Pervious pavers sweep across the space, contributing to the underground stormwater system. LED strip lights on the walls make this composition as dramatic during night performances as it is during the day.

ASLA-MN is the Minnesota Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) which represents nearly 300 professionals in the landscape architecture profession through advocacy, education, communication, and fellowship. ASLA, the national organization, has more than 18,000 members and 48 chapters, representing all 50 states, U.S. territories, and 42 countries around the world. For more information about the 2014 ASLA-MN awards, see http://asla-mn.org/awards/2014-award-recipients.

Link to MCTC article

In addition, LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new park projects:

LHB was commissioned to design a public restroom facility for the historically sensitive Noerenberg gardens operated by Three Rivers Park District. The gardens serve approximately 29,000 visitors annually and are located on Lake Minnetonka in Orono, Minnesota. The restroom facility design will take visual cues from the existing historical buildings but carry a contemporary form and expression. The new building will be sited adjacent to a redesigned gateway plaza. In an effort to contribute to the Parks Mission, the building and systems are designed for compatibility with a possible future photo voltaic installation to make the building net zero.

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board retained LHB to provide architectural and engineering services for the rehabilitation of the Columbia Park Picnic Shelter, located in Columbia Park in Northeast Minneapolis. The picnic shelter was constructed in 1955 as a gift to the City of Minneapolis from the Northeast Minneapolis Lions Club. It is a modernist two-part design composed of a brown brick box support building and an open precast concrete shelter with a low pitched gable roof.

 

+  LHB Ranked 323 by Engineering News-Recor..., May 9, 2014

LHB Ranked 323 by Engineering News-Record (ENR)

May 9, 2014

+  Duluth Road Projects Continue Almost 2 Y..., May 6, 2014

Duluth Road Projects Continue Almost 2 Years After the Flood

May 6, 2014

DULUTH – From gathering places to homes and the roads we use to get around, many pieces of people’s daily life were changed by the Northland flash flood.

For Duluth, public infrastructure was damaged in areas across the entire stretch of the city.

“There were literally tens if not hundreds of projects across the city that needed to get worked on.” Civil Engineer Scott said.

Engineers who worked for and with the City of Duluth say most projects are now finally completed, like resconstructing the area near Hawthorne and Vermillion Rd.- a place so damaged, the governor and others had to see it firsthand.

But some are still waiting for attention, like Seven Bridges Road, which will actually be moved a hundred feet to the east as a safety measure.

“In the immediate aftermath of the flood there were areas above Amity Creek near the Lester River Ski Trail parking lot that were basically, literally just sluffed away,” Scott explained.

The main reason some projects have yet to begin is because the process for shovels to hit the ground isn’t easy. “Because of the federal money and FEMA money there’s so many requirements to follow and if you slip up you potentiality could lose your funding, be it your dates, your paperwork,” Senior Engineering Specialist Patrick Mlakar said.

And not to mention, a staff of city employees were just handed a case load they couldn’t have planned for.

“We obviously didn’t have enough people on board to even deal with all this,” Mlakar said. “There were some overloaded people, I was one of them, and you just deal with it.”

With a growing number of projects now complete and others close to that point, engineers say these past two years have been busy, but they’re not complaining.

It’s been a once in a lifetime chance to take on a large scale project with all the challenges that come along with it. And the finished product makes it all worth it.

“It’s nice to see the city bounce back from that devastation,” Scott said.

link to news video

 

Monday, May 5, 2014

By: Dana Thayer  |  Photojournalist: Kathryn White

FOX 21 News, KQDS-DT

+  ASLA-MN Merit Award Winning Projects, May 5, 2014

ASLA-MN Merit Award Winning Projects

May 5, 2014

LHB won merit awards in the general design category for both Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard (Center City, MN) and the Minneapolis Community & Technical College Fine Arts Plaza (Minneapolis, MN) at the ASLA-MN awards banquet held on May 2!

Link to complete list of 2014 award winners

Link to MCTC article


Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard

Hazelden Ignatia Courtyard


MCTC Fine Arts Plaza

MCTC Fine Arts Plaza_05

 

 

 

+  LHB New Staff, May 2, 2014

LHB New Staff

May 2, 2014

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (May 2, 2014) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

 

Jared KempJared Kemp joins the Duluth Office as a Mechanical Lead in the Industrial group. He is a Mechanical Engineer licensed in the State of Minnesota with over 18 years of design experience in project management, material handling, dust collection systems, HVAC, piping systems, and commissioning in the mining and industrial mineral processing fields.


Stuart ShrimptonStuart Shrimpton joins the Minneapolis Office full-time as an Architectural Designer. Stuart joined LHB as an intern in 2013 and worked on a variety of projects. He will complete the Masters of Architecture program at the University of Minnesota in May 2014.


Spencer WileniusSpencer Wilenius joins the Duluth Office full-time as a Technician with the Pipeline group. Spencer joined LHB in 2013 as a scanner and CAD Intern.


R_140509_webviewAmanda Isaacs joins the Duluth Office full-time as a Technician with the Pipeline group. Amanda joined LHB in 2013 as a CAD Intern.


R_140509_N6_webviewMatt Turner is now a full-time Intermediate Survey Crew Chief with our Duluth Office Public Works group. Matt joined LHB in 2013 as a Survey Technician.


R_140509_N3_webviewJeffrey Smith joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Public Works group.


R_140509_N5_webviewLee Carson joins the Duluth Office as a Survey Technician for the Public Works group.


LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

 

 

 

 

+  Green Prairie Living and Learning Commun..., April 18, 2014

Green Prairie Living and Learning Community Achieves LEED NC Gold Certification

April 18, 2014

The University of Minnesota – Morris is home to the newly LEED NC Gold Certified Green Prairie Living and Learning Community.

Link to campus brochure “Profile” with a full description of the project (starts on page 17)

+  BRE Winner: LHB Interior Renovation ..., April 18, 2014

BRE Winner: LHB Interior Renovation – Commercial

April 18, 2014

Why it won

The use of recyclable materials, sustainable-design strategies and the creation of a workplace with many worker-centric amenities set the LHB interior renovation apart for Best in Real Estate judges.

“It’s interesting how they paid attention to who their employees were,” Patricia Gnetz said. “They paid attention to support and friendliness.”

John Shardlow agreed. “We shouldn’t be surprised that an architectural firm does a good job on the interior. They took it a step further.”

Stats

  • Location: 701 Washington Ave. N., Minneapolis
  • Groundbreaking: May 28, 2013
  • Completed: August 2, 2013
  • Size: 16,396 square feet
  • Value: $1.1 million

LEED goal

Targeting LEED Commercial Interiors Platinum Certification

Players

Owner and developer of building: United Properties

Broker for owner and tenant: Cushman & Wakefield/NorthMarq

Tenant: LHB

General contractor: RJM Construction

Architect; interior designer; structural, mechanical and electrical engineer: LHB

 

Andrew Tellijohn, Contributing writer (Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal)

+  Mohawk Group invites you to learn more a..., April 14, 2014

Mohawk Group invites you to learn more about the Living Building Challenge

April 14, 2014

The Living Building Challenge is coming to Minneapolis-St. Paul! Please join local sustainability leaders for a special event celebrating the growth of the Living Building Challenge Collaborative in Minneapolis-St. Paul. The Institute’s Richard Graves and Rochelle Routman of Mohawk Group will be the keynote speakers. Mohawk wholly embraces product transparency, as evidenced by its Declare Labels, HPDs, and EPDs that support the bulk of its commercial product line. Additionally, Mohawk is connecting and educating others about the Living Building Challenge through the Institute’s Ambassador Network and Living Building Challenge workshops throughout North America in 2014.

When: Wednesday, April 30, 2014 – 5:00pm to 8:00pm
Where: Intelligent Nutrients, 983 E Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55414

SPECIAL GUESTS

Richard Graves – Executive Director of the International Living Future Institute
Richard directs the Institute’s signature programs: the Living Building Challenge, Natural Step USA, Ecotone Publishing and the Cascadia Green Building Council. The Institute’s work moves across scales, offering global strategies for lasting sustainability, partnering with local communities to create grounded and relevant solutions, and reaching out to individuals to unleash their imagination and innovation to create a future that is socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative. Before joining the Institute, he was the Senior Vice President for Community and Education with the U.S. Green Building Council from 2010 to 2012 he directed programs for its national and international members. As a volunteer with the USGBC, he served on the National Board from 2006 to 2010. Richard is a registered architect previously worked for the Minneapolis office of Perkins+Will, working on ecologically sustainable building and planning projects around the world. He lives in Minnesota.

Rochelle Routman is Mohawk Industry’s Director of Sustainability, where she is joyfully leading the flooring division in its sustainability endeavors and assisting Mohawk’s customers in achieving their sustainability goals. Prior to joining Mohawk, she was employed in sustainability leadership positions in the electric utility and aeronautics industries, as well as public service. She holds a B.S. from UGA and an M.S. in Public Policy from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is a registered Professional Geologist, a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager, and a LEED Accredited Professional (O+M). Following graduate school, Rochelle led a neighborhood group which successfully acquired the funding which resulted in the preservation of a 30-acre greenspace, the Morningside Nature Preserve. Rochelle is currently a Member of the Board of Directors for both the Green Chamber of the South and Sustainable Atlanta, and also serves on the HPD Collaborative Manufacturers Advisory Panel (MAP).

Maureen Colburn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is an architect and Project Manager in LHB’s Minneapolis office. Maureen’s career has focused on her passions: utilizing architectural knowledge and leadership skills to provide quality homes for people of all income levels with the least possible impact on the environment. In 2012, Maureen became a Volunteer Facilitator of the Living Building Challenge and started the Minneapolis-St. Paul Living Building Challenge Collaborative. She is also a co-founder of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Chapter of Architecture for Humanity and past chair of the AIA Minnesota Committee on the Environment.

 

+  Delegation of Duluth Leaders meet with F..., April 10, 2014

Delegation of Duluth Leaders meet with FAA Officials

April 10, 2014

“LHB CEO Bill Bennett was part of a delegation of Duluth leaders, along with Rep. Rick Nolan (D-Minn.) and Lt. Gov. Yvonne Prettner Solon (D-Minn.) who met with top Federal Aviation Administration officials in Washington on April 8, 2014. The group was in DC to express the need for a runway extension at the Duluth airport to help support the efforts of the Minnesota Air National Guard’s 148th Fighter Wing. The group also has support from U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Al Franken (D-Minn.).”

http://www.wdio.com/article/stories/S3393002.shtml?cat=10359

http://www.northlandsnewscenter.com/news/local/Duluth-Airport-officials-meet-with-FAA-in-Washington-DC-for-runway-expansion-project–254459911.html

+  Growing and Making an Impact: LHB, April 10, 2014

Growing and Making an Impact: LHB

April 10, 2014

You may not realize it, but LHB likely has impacted your life in some way. The design, architect, and engineering firm in Duluth has had a hand in many places in the Northland, like the new Haines Road, the Whole Foods Coop, Essentia Health buildings, the 148th Fighter Wing, the two new middle schools in Duluth, area colleges, and even the Aerial Lift Bridge.

LHB was founded in 1966. One of the founder’s first projects, was the original arena at the DECC. “We continue to do work there. One of the positives that we see, is that we have long-term relationships with really good clients, and that helps us stay in Duluth,” CEO Bill Bennett explained.

The company started with seven people. They’ve grown now to 250, between the Duluth and Minneapolis offices.

“We’re actually the 45th fastest growing design company across the nation,” Bennett said. “It’s been fun to see the hiring of so many young people.”

The Duluth office recently underwent a major remodel. They utilized concepts of sustainability throughout, especially with the lighting and the materials used, like the carpeting.

Bennett told us some of the high growth areas he sees for his firm are health care and the oil and gas industry. “We do see some softness in the building sector though.”

Still, the folks at LHB are very busy. And Bennett is proud of the work they’re doing. “To see our staff involved in all of the projects, and to see them growing the same pride, is rewarding. That’s what puts Duluth on the map, and we each want to make it better every year.”

link to article with video

Article by WDIO.com
04/09/2014 12:41 PM

 

 

+  Duluth is adding jobs, but running out o..., April 1, 2014

Duluth is adding jobs, but running out of housing

April 1, 2014

There is a lot of optimism about the future of Duluth these days, given the city’s burgeoning arts and outdoor scene, low unemployment and a growing number of new jobs.

In just the past two years, Duluth-based LHB, an engineering firm, has added nearly 100 employees.

Among them is Caralyn Stevens, a designer who grew up across the bridge in Superior, Wis. But when she returned home for her new job in 2012, she wanted to live in Duluth, where she would be close to work and a short drive from the woods.

“It has everything going for it and it has all the potential to just keep getting better and better, with more jobs, more young professionals,” she said. “Our friends are coming to the area.”

But Duluth came with one drawback: It was nearly impossible to find a decent place to rent.

“I don’t need a castle,” Stevens said. “But I found myself in about a 300 square foot studio apartment, on the third floor of an old building, paying between $550-600 for a 300 square foot apartment. It just felt like robbery.”

Stories like that frustrate Duluth Mayor Don Ness, who aims to make the city not just a weekend tourist destination, but also an attractive place to settle.

That’s why Duluth is investing in trails and parks while also focusing on downtown arts and culture venues. The strategy appears to be paying dividends.

Several growing companies, including women’s clothing retailer Maurice’s, and pipeline builder Enbridge, are bringing young professionals and families to town. But the city needs more affordable places to live, Ness said.

“If we’re going to grow our community, grow our tax base, grow our population, we can’t do that unless we’re aggressive at investing in our housing stock,” the mayor said, noting that many of the newcomers can afford moderately priced construction.

According to the most recent state data, Duluth added more than 1,000 jobs between the fall of 2012 and 2013. Jobs in the engineering and architectural services field have nearly doubled in the past decade.

“Folks are coming in and they’re making $50,000 a year,” Ness said. “Those are good jobs.”

“What they’re looking for is a nice, clean modern unit that they can spend somewhere between $600 and $1,200 a month,” he said. “So it’s not the very low income [but] it’s not the very expensive places.”

The need for more housing has increased as Duluth’s unemployment rate has shrunk to pre-recession levels. A recent study concludes the city needs 1,000 new housing units in the next three years and an additional 1,300 by 2020. The city’s rental vacancy rate is less than two percent, half of what housing experts consider a healthy rate.

Other towns far from the Twin Cities metro area face similar dilemmas, from Roseau and Thief River Falls to Worthington.

Digi-Key is busing workers to Thief River Falls. The rental vacancy rate in Roseau, where snowmobile manufacturer Polaris is thriving, is essentially zero.

So if the demand is there, why aren’t developers rushing in?

“The economics of it just don’t work, when rents have traditionally been low in communities like this,” said Mary Tingerthal, is commissioner of the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency.

Tingerthal said developers worry people in Duluth and other Minnesota towns won’t be willing to pay enough in rent to earn a sufficient return on their investment.

“While someone in the Twin Cities, a young professional, might not blink twice at the idea of paying $1,100, $1,200 a month rent for a one-bedroom apartment, the perception is that one of the advantages of living in Greater Minnesota is that rents are lower,” she said.

Tingerthal said the state is encouraging developers to push up rents a bit, because new hires often can afford more than the prevailing market rates.

“It’s a matter of priming the pump, getting developers to recognize that a community is back on the upswing, and that they should be looking forward in terms of where they’re looking to price their product, rather than looking backwards to the bad old days in Duluth, where it was really tough to attract young folks.”

The state is investing $10 million over two years into developing housing in communities with tight housing markets. State lawmakers have introduced bills this session to allow developers to employ tax increment financing, a method of capturing the property taxes generated from a new development and then using that revenue to help finance the project. Currently, Minnesota allows such financing only for subsidized housing projects.

Until the housing picture improves, the city will miss opportunities to attract some potential residents. One who got away is Linda Kerr, an administrative assistant from the Iron Range town of Virginia, who quickly grew frustrated with a market that offered little for someone looking for mid-priced housing.

Before finding a place in Superior, Kerr commuted 125 miles round trip to work, rather than pay $1,200 a month for a small rental house.

“It almost seemed like it was worth it to make the commute and pay the extra money in gas, rather than spend that kind of money on a place to live,” she said.

But in seeking to broaden its housing options, Duluth faces some unique challenges, said Chris Eng, executive director of the Duluth Economic Development Authority.

“We’re a fully built out city, and most of the sites we’re looking at are redevelopment sites,” Eng said. “And redevelopment is always more expensive than a green field.”

Also, while Duluth is creating jobs, since 2000 the population has remained flat at about 86,000 residents. In part, that explains why there aren’t any production builders in Duluth, outfits that can finance and construct an entire subdivision at once, said Chelle Eliason, executive officer of the Arrowhead Builders Association. She said builders in Duluth typically are only willing to risk building three or five homes.

“That is an issue, because you’re talking about building on an economy of scale,” Eliason said. “So you’re bringing the prices of the houses down if you have a larger number of houses that you’re constructing.”

The city is exploring ways to reduce the cost of construction. Officials are also working with employers to match a $500,000 challenge grant from the Greater Minnesota Housing Fund to build new workforce housing.

That would be welcome news for aircraft maintenance company AAR, which has hired 300 people since opening in Duluth about a year ago.

Mark Ketterer, the company’s vice president of operations, said many of those employees are forced to stay in hotels for several weeks when they’re first hired. The company plans to open a fourth maintenance line in September.

“We’ll be adding another 60 to 70 people between now and then,” Ketterer said. “So I don’t see it getting any easier in that short of a time period.”

Duluth officials say a number of developers hope to turn dirt on new housing projects when the snow melts. They’re needed quickly. The city has about 1,000 job openings.

MPRnews by Dan Kraker | Duluth, Minn. | 

http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/03/31/duluth-housing

+  LHB New Green Globe Certifications, Reco..., March 28, 2014

LHB New Green Globe Certifications, Recognition, and Staff

March 28, 2014

LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following new Green Globes Professional certifications, recognition, and employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

David Williams and Nick Vreeland are now Green Globe Professionals. David Williams has 32 years of mechanical design experience and specializes in solar energy systems, unique/special system design, and sustainability. Nick Vreeland has 11 years of architectural design experience. Nick works on a variety of commercial, education, and multi-family housing projects with a focus on sustainable design. Green Globes is a green building rating system that offers an alternative to the US Green Building Council’s LEED rating system as a way to advance the overall environmental performance and sustainability of buildings.

Becky Alexander won the “Best Romance” award in Architecture Minnesota’s Videotect competition for her video entry, “Searching for Morels.” http://architecturemn.com/am/videotect.html

In addition, LHB welcomes the following individuals to the firm:

Andy Sydow has been hired as a Mechanical Designer with the Pipeline group in the Minneapolis office.

David Polson joins the Duluth office as a Civil Designer working for the Public Works group.

Roger Logdahl joins the Duluth Office as a Structural Lead with the Industrial group.

Jean Farmakes has been hired as General Counsel for the company.

Nickolas Johnson joins the Duluth office as an Electrical Designer working for the Pipeline group.

+  LEED interior certification slow to catc..., March 19, 2014

LEED interior certification slow to catch on

March 19, 2014

In LHB Inc.’s new office in the Loose-Wiles Building in Minneapolis, a wall  of windows bathes part of the room in a warm glow of natural light. On a ceiling  above the architecture firm’s office are a series of sensors that dim and  brighten lights based on whether employees are at their desks or gone.

LHB is attempting to earn a platinum level LEED for Commercial Interiors  (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification from the  Washington D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council. Rick Carter, commercial focus  leader, says the office has energy efficient lighting, furniture and carpets  made partly of recycled materials and, perhaps most important, a location in a  densely populated neighborhood near transit lines.

“We were at the Traffic Zone (Center for Visual Art) for 15 years and after  we decided to move into this space we decided to try for LEED Platinum,” Carter  said. “Since we have designed many LEED buildings, it just made sense that our  office should be LEED certified.”

LEED certification has taken off for new construction and for  renovations.  But the designation for interior design hasn’t made much  headway in Minnesota.

Sheri Brezinski, executive director of the Green Building Council’s Minnesota  chapter (which actually resides in LHB’s space), said only 29 offices have been  certified, a tiny slice of the LEED pie.

“I think there is some interest in it but there are far fewer people who are  certified under that LEED system,” she said. “It depends upon who owns the  building, what condition it’s in and how it’s configured.”

Not all office tenants have much control over office design, heating or  lighting, Brezinski said. LEED-CI works best when an office is undergoing a  renovation or when a tenant is first moving in, she added, as was the case with  LHB.

To really make LEED work a tenant has to have a willing building owner, a  good architect and an urban location, she said. In most cases the cost compared  to a traditional office is minimal, at most 2 percent to 3 percent more than a  standard  renovation, with some of the budget required to pay for the  paperwork involved in a LEED submission, she said.

Read more: http://finance-commerce.com/2014/03/leed-interior-certification-slow-to-catch-on/#ixzz2wPm40Zwq

By: Frank  Jossi March 19, 2014

+  Minnesota Ranks 10th in LEED Certificati..., February 19, 2014

Minnesota Ranks 10th in LEED Certification

February 19, 2014

+  LHB Announces New Licensures, New Employ..., February 19, 2014

LHB Announces New Licensures, New Employees and Community Involvement

February 19, 2014

LHB New Licensures and Staff

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (February 18, 2014) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following newly earned licensures and employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Michael Bilben has recently earned his Professional Engineer – Electrical (PE) licensure from the State of Minnesota and provides electrical design services for the Healthcare group in the Minneapolis office.  Bilben earned his Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Electronics Engineering at North Dakota State University. Bilben’s experience includes interior and exterior lighting design, building power and telecommunications system design, and fire and emergency communication systems.  Bilben also conducts facility assessment studies, commissioning, retro-commissioning, and specification writing and editing.

Tom Johnson passed his Structural Engineering (SE) exam with the State of Minnesota. The SE exam is administered by NCEES (National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying). He provides structural engineering for the Public Works and Structures group in the Duluth office. Johnson earned his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering at North Dakota State University, a Master of Science in Structural Geology at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, and provides expertise in designing precast concrete, steel, and timber buildings and buildings with masonry bearing walls.  He also has experience in designing structures for high voltage substations, and designing marine structures within the Duluth harbor.

Valerie Raiche joins the Duluth Office as an Administrative Assistant.

Dana Waldbillig has been hired as an Administrative Assistant in the Duluth office.

Andrew Lund joins the Duluth office as a Civil Designer working for the Industrial group.

LHB in the Community

LHB’s Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, completed his leadership role on the Greater Downtown Council’s (GDC) Board of Directors located in Duluth. Bennett served on the board from 2003 to 2013 including serving as the organization’s Chair of the Board. He continues his involvement with the GDC as the Chair of the Downtown Parking Advisory Committee, an organization he helped the GDC co-found with the City of Duluth.

Becky Alexander, Designer at LHB, spoke at the Energy Forum on Advanced Building Skins Conference in Bressanone, Italy. Becky was a guest speaker at the conference to present “The Artful Solar Envelope: Engaging with Minnesota’s Four Seasons in an Off-grid Wandering Restaurant.” The presentation featured her design of a wandering restaurant with a solar thermal cladding system. The experiential qualities of this design are featured in Architecture Minnesota’s Videotect4 competition: #11 “Searching for Morels” at http://www.architecturemn.com/am/voting.html.

As part of a challenge among Engineering CEOs of Minnesota, LHB raised over $6,000 for local and regional food shelves in the Twin Ports and Twin Cities. Overall, the group of competing firms raised more than $100,000.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Projects Awarded LEED Silver Certifi..., January 31, 2014

LHB Projects Awarded LEED Silver Certification

January 31, 2014

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (January 23, 2013) –LHB has three projects which have received the US Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification. With a mission of improving communities through high quality design, LEED Certified projects are a significant component of LHB’s culture.

LHB designed the LEED Silver Certified Detroit Lakes Wetland Management District Headquarters and Visitor Center for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The building serves as the entry to welcome the District’s 15,600 annual visitors, provides adequate space for staff, and safe accessibility to trails and parking lots. LHB provided the architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, and engineering (civil, structural, mechanical, and electrical) design services for the project in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota.

 The Minnesota Air National Guard’s (MnANG) 133rd Airlift Wing’s Starbase Facility was awarded LEED Silver Certification. LHB provided design and construction administration services for the $2 million renovation of an existing building to house a nonprofit STEM program that provides science, technology, engineering, and math education to underprivileged children, grades 4 through 6, from inner city schools in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. The program is funded in part by the Department of Defense and sponsored by the Minnesota Air National Guard.

 LHB provided pre-design, design, and construction administration services for Lake Superior College’s $13 million Health and Science Center facility consisting of 50,800 square feet of new space and 33,250 square feet of remodeled space. LHB worked with design architect, Ross Barney Architects, to design the project to LEED NC Silver and to also meet the State of Minnesota’s B3 Sustainable Guidelines.

 LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter, rick.carter@LHBcorp.com or visit http://www.lhbcorp.com/.

+  Diamond Level Sponsor LHB is New Home to..., January 8, 2014

Diamond Level Sponsor LHB is New Home to USGBC-MN

January 8, 2014

Duluth/Minneapolis, MN (January 8, 2014) – The Loose-Wiles building in Minneapolis is now home to two groups of professionals specializing in sustainable design and high performance buildings: the Minneapolis office of the architecture and engineering firm LHB, and the US Green Building Council’s Minnesota chapter. USGBC is a national organization well known for their LEED green building rating program, and Minnesota can lay claim to over 300 buildings having achieved USGBC’s LEED certification. LHB Minneapolis aims to add its own name to the list and is targeting the highest level of certification, LEED platinum, in its new North Loop location.

To further their commitment to sustainability, LHB has not only become home to USGBC-MN but is the first Diamond level sponsor of the chapter. USGBC’s mission of improving the quality of life through the way buildings are designed and built partners well with LHB’s mission of improving communities through high-quality design. The LEED program developed by USGBC is celebrating its 20th year with LHB’s involvement dating back to the 1997 completion of their LEED pilot project, Phillips Eco-Enterprise Center. Since then, LHB has been on the team for 22 LEED certified projects. Additionally, Rick Carter, a Senior Vice President of LHB, was in the inaugural 2011 class of LEED Fellows.

+  Renaissance Box: Winner of the 2013 Affo..., December 9, 2013

Renaissance Box: Winner of the 2013 Affordable Housing Design Award

December 9, 2013

Renaissance Box, an inspired renovation of an historic shoe factory in downtown St. Paul, Minnesota, into 70 units of LEED-Gold affordable housing, was awarded the 2013 Affordable Housing Design Award by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Minnesota and the McKnight Foundation. Aeon developed the project, and LHB Corp. is the architect. This Ryan Siemers (ryansiemers.com) video tells the story of the project and its impact on the community. architecturemn.com

Renaissance Box Vimeo Link

+  LHB Wins ASID Award for Ordean East Midd..., November 25, 2013

LHB Wins ASID Award for Ordean East Middle School

November 25, 2013

LHB recently received second place in the Institutional Category of the 2013 American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) Minnesota Chapter’s annual awards. The Duluth Public Schools’, Ordean East Middle School project was submitted by Interior Designer, Aaron Hansen of LHB, under the title, “An Education Rich in History.”.

The awards celebration was held at the International Market Square in Minneapolis, MN. An entire listing of awards can be found on ASID MN Awards Page or asidmn.org.

The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) is a community of 30,000 members including “designers, industry representatives, educators and students” committed to interior design. Through education, knowledge sharing, advocacy, community building and outreach, ASID strives to advance the interior design profession and, in the process, to demonstrate and celebrate the power of design to positively change people’s lives.

+  Energy Forum on Advanced Building Skins ..., November 25, 2013

Energy Forum on Advanced Building Skins Conference

November 25, 2013

Becky Alexander, Architectural Designer at LHB, recently attended the Energy Forum on Advanced Building Skins Conference in Bressanone, Italy. Becky was a guest speaker at the conference and presented “The Artful Solar Envelope: Engaging with Minnesota’s four seasons in an off-grid wandering restaurant”. Her presentation on building integrated solar thermal was well received by those attending the conference and sparked much interest in both the wandering restaurant concept and the solar thermal cladding system.

There were a wide range of speakers from around the world addressing a variety of topics including: the use of shape memory alloys for dynamic shading systems, a case study that embedded nearly all the building’s functions into a meter thick exterior envelope, and a protocol for verifying net zero buildings. Becky personally enjoyed the presentation on Climate Camouflage, which characterized the building envelope as an energy transfer station (shifting paradigms from the First Law of Thermodynamics – conservation of energy – to the Second – entropy generation).

+  LHB Staff News, November 15, 2013

LHB Staff News

November 15, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (November 15, 2013) – LHB has hired the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Lee Koppy is Civil Project Manager in the Pipeline and Utilities Group. A licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota, he is also a LEED Accredited Professional. Lee has over 22 years of experience in public and private sector civil engineering design, administration, project management, and management of personnel.

Katie Jolma is a Civil Designer in the Public Works and Structures Group. Katie is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin – Platteville and brings three years of prior experience.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB celebrates staff, headquarters expan..., November 8, 2013

LHB celebrates staff, headquarters expansion

November 8, 2013

LHB on Thursday held an open house and ribbon cutting at its Duluth office to celebrate the company’s recent growth and remodeling.
The architectural and engineering firm, founded by Lauren Larsen in 1966, has grown to almost 250 this year after peaking at 180 before the recession forced a 10 percent reduction.

President Bill Bennett credited his staff and clients for LHB’s rapid growth during the past two years, which promoted the firm to remodel its headquarters at 21 W. Superior St.

“It’s going to be well worth it. We believe it was the right thing to do for a variety of reasons,” Bennett said.

The company added 4,000 square feet at its Duluth office at a cost of $1.8 million during a project that spanned five months and covered three floors. It now occupies 43,000 square feet in the building, which is owned by Minnesota Power. As part of the project, LHB upgraded video and other systems to offer the latest technology. In October, the company finalized a relocation of its office in Minneapolis, where the company also has been expanding.

About 60 percent of LHB’s work is for infrastructure clients and 40 percent for building customers.

Cited from BusinessNorth.com

+  LHB Projects listed as MN Brownfields Re..., November 7, 2013

LHB Projects listed as MN Brownfields ReScape Award Finalists

November 7, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (November 7, 2013) LHB was involved in three projects listed as finalists for the Minnesota Brownfields ReScape Award. The three projects being considered are: Renaissance Box (environmental impact category), Wildwood Elementary (small city impact category), and Itasca Eco-Enterprise Park (small city impact category). Finalists were chosen based on how they transform abandoned or underutilized sites using innovative solutions to significant environmental issues.

“Brownfield redevelopments create jobs, increase local tax bases and attract millions of dollars in private investments,” said Katie Clark Sieben, Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. “These projects are a tribute to the success of brownfield redevelopment projects throughout Minnesota.”

“The ReScape Awards offers the opportunity to recognize the exceptional redevelopment challenges posed by brownfield sites and to honor innovative projects throughout the state of Minnesota that can serve as models for future redevelopment”, stated Executive Director Martha Faust.

Renaissance Box is the first apartment building in Minnesota to achieve LEED NC Gold certification. LHB provided the architecture, landscape architecture, and civil engineering design services for this affordable housing project in Saint Paul, MN.

Wildwood Elementary is a new PreK-2 elementary school located in Mahtomedi, MN. LHB provided architectural, interior design, and structural services for the new building and to implement the district’s long term facility plan. The new, LEED-Gold-designed school serves 600 students and the district’s early childhood programs.

Itasca Eco-Enterprise Park is located in Grand Rapids, MN. LHB designed the demolition and remodeling of existing portions of the former Ainsworth plant into this Eco-Enterprise Park. Services included structural, electrical, mechanical, civil, fire protection, architectural, and code review.

The Minnesota Brownfields awards program recognizes exemplary brownfield redevelopment projects completed throughout the State of Minnesota. The awards ceremony will take place on Thursday, November 7th at the Union Depot in Saint Paul, MN. The public can purchase single tickets or tables online at www.rescapeawards.com. For more information about Minnesota Brownfields, visit www.mnbrownfields.org.

+  APEX celebrates LHB’s growth, expa..., November 6, 2013

APEX celebrates LHB’s growth, expansion

November 6, 2013

On Monday, November 4th the Area Partnership for Economic Expansion (APEX) hosted the third APEX Insider for the organization’s investor-members. Over 30 private-sector leaders attended to celebrate the recent growth and expansion of LHB.

The APEX Insider provided investor-members the opportunity to tour the recent expansion and remodel of the Company’s downtown Duluth location. LHB recently invested over $1.8 million in the Company’s headquarters located in the Lake Superior Place building which is owned by one of their long-term clients, Minnesota Power. With the expansion and remodel, LHB now occupies approximately 43,000 square feet and the entire 4th, 5th and 6th floors of the building. “In addition to expanding our physical space, LHB invested in technology that allows our employees the ability to work from the office location they desire on projects being managed in either office. Recruiting and retaining the best talent is paramount to our success and where employees reside is a major component of employee satisfaction,” commented Bill Bennett, LHB CEO.

“APEX was delighted to provide our investor-members the opportunity to tour LHB’s downtown Duluth facility and highlight the outstanding growth they have recently experienced,” commented APEX President and CEO, Brian Hanson. “LHB has grown from a structural engineering firm to a complete full-service firm, greatly contributing to the development of the regional economy.” Bennett also conveyed excitement at the opportunity to host an APEX Insider, “It was LHB’s pleasure to host the event at our office and showcase the diverse talents of our employees,” stated Bennett. “We have a strong team of multi-faceted professionals, giving us a unique balance between an engineering firm and an architectural firm.”

LHB has served the Duluth/Superior and Twin Cities markets for over 47 years and has experienced significant growth in the past five years. As a result, LHB has grown from 180 employees in 2008 to a combined total of 250 in both markets. With annual gross revenue of around $28 million, LHB estimates that the Company provides design services for approximately $300 million in construction each year spread throughout the various infrastructure and building markets it serves.

Cited from BusinessNorth.com

+  LHB Staff Accomplishments, November 1, 2013

LHB Staff Accomplishments

November 1, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (October 31, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to recognize the accomplishments of the following employees in our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Andrew Madson received his Minnesota license in architecture. Andy joined LHB’s Housing Studio in 2002. He designs projects involving renovation, new construction, and historic status requirements, He is a member of the American Institute of Architects – Minnesota and is a LEED Accredited Professional. Andy received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Architecture Degrees from the University of Minnesota.

Brian Santori received his Professional Engineering licensure in Minnesota. Brian joined LHB’s Pipeline Group in 2006 and designs routes, verifies project drawings, reviews projects, specifies materials, and assists in project management for clients. He has a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Degree from the University of Minnesota Duluth.

Elizabeth Turner received her Master of Science in Architecture — Sustainable Design from the University of Minnesota. Elizabeth was also a finalist for the 2013 national AASHE Student Campus Sustainability Research Award.

Collin Osenroth received his Professional Engineering licensure in Wisconsin. Collin joined LHB in 2012 and brings seven years of experience to the Industrial Focus. A graduate of Michigan Technological University, he has Bachelor and Master of Science Degrees in Civil Engineering. Collin is responsible for structural design, analysis, and inspection of industrial facilities.

Christopher Miller received his Professional Engineering licensure in Minnesota. Chris joined the Public Works/Structures Group in 2008 and has a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Degree from North Dakota State University. He specializes in bridge and retaining wall investigation, design, and construction administration.

Gayle Taylor was recently elected as the Construction Specifications Institute’s (CSI) Twin Ports Chapter President. Gayle was a founding member of the chapter and has been with LHB since 1989. She is a Senior Administrative Assistant for the Integrated Building Design Team.

+  LHB Anniversary and New Staff, October 23, 2013

LHB Anniversary and New Staff

October 23, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (October 24, 2013) – LHB’s Minneapolis office celebrated providing 25 years of design services in the Twin Cities Metro area with an open house on October 22nd in our new space located in the Loose-Wiles building. Prior to the open house, national guest speaker, Mark LaLiberte, of Construction Instruction presented “Building Performance for a Healthier Environment” to guests and staff.

In addition, LHB has hired the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Lisa Breuer is a Civil Project Manager in the Public Works and Structures Group. She is a licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan, and Wyoming. Lisa has 28 years of experience involved with engineering, regulatory processes, project management and planning, cost estimates and overall project coordination of staff, contractors, and agencies. She has managed multidisciplinary teams on site investigations, designs, permitting, and construction of numerous projects for major companies, government agencies, and private industries. Lisa’s project experience includes slope stability, foundations, excavations, dams and levees, permitting, wastewater treatment plants, and roads.

Melissa White is a Civil Senior Project Engineer in the Public Works and Structures Group. A licensed Professional Engineer in Minnesota, she is also a LEED Accredited Professional. Melissa has over 11 years of experience designing and working with integrated teams for military, commercial, residential, and municipal clients. Her experience includes site, utility, roadway, erosion control, permitting, and drainage design.

Zachary Jolma is a Civil Project Engineer in the Public Works and Structures Group. He has over five years of experience in municipal and state transportation construction administration for roadway, bridges, and culverts, and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Iowa.

Other new employees include:                                                                                                  

Bonnie Zwirn (Document Management Specialist, Industrial Group),

Heidi Golliet (Administrative Assistant, Minneapolis Office),

Charles Thannum (Technician, Public Works and Structures Group),

Lisa Mertz (Administrative Assistant, Duluth Office),

Jessica Ritchie (Human Resources Generalist, Corporate),

Linda Kerr (Administrative Assistant, Public Works and Structures Group),

Christopher Haralson (Technician, Public Works and Structures Group),

Zac Abukhodair (Technician, Public Works and Structures Group).

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Staff News, October 16, 2013

LHB Staff News

October 16, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (October 16, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Robin Rusboldt – Engineering Lead Technician, Pipeline and Utilities Group.

Kristina Mehrman – Civil Designer, Public Works and Structures Group.

Adam Erkkila – Engineering Technician, Industrial Group.

Ashley Rentz – Contracts Administration Assistant, Pipeline and Utilities Group.

Matthew Johnson – Technician, Public Works and Structures Group.

Nathan Rigelman – Safety Specialist, Corporate.

Daniel Jacobsen – Civil Designer, Pipeline and Utilities Group.

Samuel Diedrich – Technician, Public Works and Structures Group. 

Suzanna Somrock – Cost Administrator, Pipeline and Utilities Group.

James Starr – Project Designer, Integrated Building Design Group.

Orion Jackson -Engineering Technician, Pipeline and Utilities Group.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Receives Minnesota Concrete & M..., October 7, 2013

LHB Receives Minnesota Concrete & Masonry Contractors Association (MCMCA) Award

October 7, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (October 7, 2013) LHB received the 2013 Minnesota Concrete & Masonry Contractors Association (MCMCA) Award for the design of the SpringHouse Ministry Center located in the Whittier Neighborhood of Minneapolis.

Challenged by the realities of changing demographics and the demands of an oversized, outdated, and collapsing historic structure, Salem English Lutheran Church partnered with Lyndale United Church of Christ and First Christian Church to create the SpringHouse Ministry Center–a new model for ministry. SpringHouse Ministry Center chose to reuse Salem’s original structure due to its legacy in the Whittier Neighborhood. Anchoring the corner of 28th and Garfield for over 100 years, the structure’s renewal enables it to be a significant physical amenity for its neighbors, and enhance the ministry of its three partner congregations.

LHB provided design services for new construction and the restoration of the historic church. The building features three sanctuaries, two on the main level and one on the lower (garden) level, as well as a commercial kitchen, and classrooms. Most of the spaces can also double as public space for community meetings and events.

Formed in 1964, the Minnesota Concrete & Masonry Contractors Association is a nonprofit trade association comprised of over one hundred concrete and masonry contractors and related companies doing business in Minnesota.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, rick.carter@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Nationally Recognized by ENR, Archit..., September 5, 2013

LHB Nationally Recognized by ENR, Architectural Record, and The Zweig Letter Hot Firm List

September 5, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (September 5, 2013) – LHB ranked as one of the top engineering and architectural firms in the nation by Engineering News-Record (ENR), Architectural Record, and as a 2013 Hot Firm by ZweigWhite.

LHB ranked No. 381, up from No. 463 two years ago, in the ENR Top 500 Design Firms List. In addition, LHB placed No. 249 on Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms List, and No. 45 on The Zweig Letter Hot Firm List.

The ENR list ranks the 500 largest U.S.-based designs firms, both publicly and privately held based on design-specific revenue. http://enr.construction.com/toplists/Top-Design-Firms/301-400.asp

Architectural Record’s Top 300 Architecture Firms list rank companies by revenue (in millions of dollars) for architectural services only. http://archrecord.construction.com/practice/top250/2013/top300-architecture-firms-5.asp

In an industry comprised of over 100,000 firms, LHB was recognized on The Zweig Letter Hot Firm List as one of the 100 fastest-growing firms in the nation. Placement is based on a firm’s percentage of revenue growth and dollar revenue growth over a three-year period. http://www.zweigwhite.com/conference/hotfirm/2013hotfirm-list.php

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218 279-2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Staff News, August 23, 2013

LHB Staff News

August 23, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (August 23, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the following licensed staff:

Jennifer Babcock is a Structural Project Manager with the Public Works and Structures Group. She is a licensed Professional Engineer and a licensed Structural Engineer II in Minnesota with over 15 years of experience.

Katie R. B. Cook is a licensed Professional Land Surveyor in Minnesota and Wisconsin with the Public Works and Structures Group with over 10 years of land survey experience.

LHB has also added the following new employees:

Jacob Lepisto (Engineering Technician, Public Works and Structures Group),

David Booth (Designer, Integrated Building Design Group),

Matthew Torvinen (Mechanical Designer, Integrated Building Design Group),

Spencer Wilenius (Office Assistant, Integrated Building Design Group),

Rebecca Alexander (Designer, Integrated Building Design Group), 

Mark Ronning (Engineering Technician Assistant, Pipeline and Utilities Group).

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

 

 

+  LHB Staff News, August 16, 2013

LHB Staff News

August 16, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (August 16, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is continuing to grow. We are pleased to announce the following new employees:

Jennifer Lewandowski (Cost Administrator),

Brandon Steffen (Engineering Technician),

Doug Freitag (Senior Engineering Technician),

Christopher Leeper (Engineering Technician),

Matthew Nordine (Structural Senior Designer),

Patrick Sheedy (Engineering Technician Assistant)

Charlie Conkel (Office Assistant).

We have also added the following interns to our staff:

Isaac Serre (Public Works and Structures Group), Stuart Shrimpton (Integrated Building Design Group), Samuel Cook (Public Works and Structures Group), Katie Ozan (Accounting Department), Chelsea Hoplin (Public Works and Structures Group), Robert Spreitzer (Pipeline and Utilities Group), Laurel Johnston (Integrated Building Design Group), Mary Keefe (Pipeline and Utilities Group), Lauren Strauss (Integrated Building Design Group), Derek Gallagher (Integrated Building Design Group).

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

 

 

+  LHB on the move and growing!, August 6, 2013

LHB on the move and growing!

August 6, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (August 6, 2013) – Starting August 9th LHB’s Minneapolis office will be located in the Loose-Wiles Building located at 701 Washington Avenue North, Suite 200, Minneapolis, MN 55401. Individual email and phone numbers will remain the same.

LHB is also pleased to announce the addition of James Schultz, as an Electrical Project Engineer in the Industrial Group and Minnesota-Licensed Architect Nathan Potratz, as an Architect in the Healthcare Group.  Other new employees include:

Thomas VonBerge (Survey Technician),

Adam Besse (Senior Civil Designer),

Kelly Thompson-Sather (Technician Assistant),

Matthew Turner (Survey Technician),

Elizabeth Mauban (Electrical Designer),

Nick Fulda (Survey Technician).

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Staff News, August 1, 2013

LHB Staff News

August 1, 2013

Duluth and Minneapolis, MN (August 1, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of Minnesota-registered staff Richard Samec, as an Electrical Project Manager in the Pipeline Group and Aaron Kelly, as an Architectural Project Manager in the Integrated Building Design Group.  Other new employees include:

Dylan Mattson (Mechanical Intern)

Pamela Grumdahl (Administrative Assistant)

Chad Miller (Designer)

Robert Stephens (Survey Technician)

John Swardstrom (Network Administrator)

Joseph Leeper (Survey Technician)

Mark Hutchins (Survey Technician)

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Hires Waugh as Historic Preservation..., July 25, 2013

LHB Hires Waugh as Historic Preservationist

July 25, 2013

LHB hired Philip Waugh as a Project Manager specializing in historic preservation and existing buildings for LHB’s Integrated Building Design Team.

Mr. Waugh brings with him 13 years of experience in historic preservation including expertise in building investigations, material research, and construction methods. He previously worked as a historic preservationist with a local design firm and prior to that served as the preservation specialist at the St. Paul Heritage Preservation Commission. Currently, Mr. Waugh sits on the Board of Directors for the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota. At LHB, Mr. Waugh’s responsibilities include project management of historic preservation projects, performing building condition surveys and analysis, writing preservation specifications, historic design reviews, writing Historic Preservation Tax Credit applications, preservation planning, and grant writing.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to our clients. We go beyond good intentions and focus on measurable performance. We are experts in: public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Mike Fischer at 612.752.6920, Mike.Fischer@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  Duluth gets new, improved neonatal inten..., July 13, 2013

Duluth gets new, improved neonatal intensive care unit

July 13, 2013

Northeast Minnesota’s only neonatal intensive care unit is about to grow.

Essentia Health-St. Mary’s Medical Center is preparing to open 18 gleaming individual patient rooms at the end of the month, giving families a private place to sleep closer to their babies and more than doubling the square footage for the unit.

The new $5.2 million space is funded partly through $2.5 million in charitable donations. Donors got a first look at the new NICU last week, according to a hospital spokeswoman.

While the old unit had three sleeping rooms that families shared, the new individual rooms will each have a foldout couch, a refrigerator and a place to keep personal items.

Cindy Kent, director of nursing at the children’s hospital, said the new setup will mean quieter rooms with adjustable lights and a better space to help parents and babies bond.

“It’s been shown to help babies grow faster, be able to eat better,” she said.

Hospital officials said the unit serves about 300 babies a year in the region, coming from as far as the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

By Pam Louwagie
StarTribune.com
Updated: July 13, 2013 – 5:07 PM

 

+  Website allows users to track GHG emissi..., July 10, 2013

Website allows users to track GHG emissions in 20 Minn. cities

July 10, 2013

 

A recently unveiled interactive website will allow residents of 20 Minnesota cities to track how their communities are reducing and adding to greenhouse gas emissions.

The project, the Regional Indicators Initiative (RII), is part of several climate change mitigation initiatives led by the state Legislature, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s GreenStep Cities program and the Regional Council of Mayors.

The website allows users to assess emissions from commercial and residential energy use, transportation, and other activities across the 20 cities from 2008 to 2011. Data from 2012 will be posted later this year.

According to data from RII, Lake Elmo had the highest residential energy use per household from 2008 to 2011. Duluth had the highest greenhouse gas emissions per capita, and Minneapolis had the
third-lowest energy costs per household of the 20 cities.

“The worst thing you can do for climate change is say you’re a green city and do things that absolutely make no difference whatsoever,” said Falcon Heights Mayor Peter Lindstrom. His city was part of the assessment when it was only a three-city pilot project. At the time, officials wanted to test whether their efforts toward sustainability and emissions reduction were cost-effective.

“I think there’s room for improvement,” he said. “I just want to make sure we’re heading in the right direction.”

RII is the result of a three-year, $225,000 investment by the Minnesota Department of Commerce, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the Urban Land Institute and the cities. The project might be expanded in the future to 40 cities.

Rick Carter, an architect with the Minneapolis firm LHB Inc., led the site’s development and has been involved in sustainability efforts.

According to Carter, the most significant trend to emerge in the data is a universal upward trajectory in energy emissions in 2011 after a downward trend from 2008 to 2010.

The uptick indicates how the growing economy’s emissions are outpacing advancements in energy efficiency and conservation, Carter said

(Bill McAuliffe, Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 10).

+  Officials unveil VA clinic renovation, July 5, 2013

Officials unveil VA clinic renovation

July 5, 2013

 

A multi-million dollar project to make better use of space at the Twin Ports VA Outpatient Clinic is creating the opportunity to serve more veterans with a wider array of health services.

Next week, Veterans Administration officials unveil for the public the renovation project that was years in the making.

While the clinic never closed during the major renovation, the Twin Ports VA Clinic is celebrating a reopening 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 12 at the clinic adjacent to Essentia Health-St. Mary’s Hospital in Superior.

VA and Essentia Health officials will make brief remarks, followed by tours of the renovated facility.

“The clinic was completely remodeled, said Dr. Clyde Markon, who oversees 12 VA clinics in the region, including the one in Superior. “We had a lot of space that over 20 years ago was probably well thought out, but as times have changed, it turned out to be not used.”

The renovation more than doubled the number of examining rooms available to serve a growing number of veterans that get medical services at the clinic.

Markon said when he started as the medical director at the Twin Ports clinic about eight years ago, the clinic served about 2,000 veterans. Now, almost 7,000 patients receive services there, growth driven by both aging World War II, Korean, and Vietnam-era war veterans with increasingly complicated ailments as they age, and current veterans entitled to free health care services for five years after demobilization.

The renovation also allowed expansion of services available to veterans.

“We now have an audiology department to help with hearing aid problems,” Markon said. “We will almost certainly have two audiologists here.”

The new facility features a soundproof room adjacent to a room where the audiologist would perform hearing tests.

The clinic also features two ophthalmology rooms where veterans can have their eyes checked.

Markon said veterans also will be able to get glasses onsite.

The clinic will have an optometrist and optician to provide the vision services veterans need, Markon said.

And veterans will no longer have to make the trek to the hospital or Duluth with the completion of the renovation project.

Markon said the clinic contracted with Essentia Health to provide physical therapy services locally, but those services are now available right in the VA Clinic.

“Essentia did a great job but the VA is no longer going to contract for services,” Markon said. “It’s just the way of the future.”

Mental health services are also being expanded at the clinic and there will be a greater focus on women’s health services.”

The clinic features examining rooms specifically designed to accommodate women. And the clinic has doubled space for procedures to be performed and completely revamped the onsite laboratory.

Another feature of the renovation is ability to use technology to consult specialists nationwide from the Superior-based clinic through V-Tell, which links the Superior Clinic to the hospital in Minneapolis.

“There’s very few specialists that can’t be seen through V-Tell,” Markon said. He said the internet-based consultation equipment would allow patients and medical personnel to consult with any specialist in the United States.

The technology also allows staff to train with medical professionals in the hospital in Minneapolis without leaving Superior.

“I want to show off what we have,” Markon said.

By: Shelley Nelson, Superior Telegram

+  Data Collection and Analysis for the Reg..., May 28, 2013

Data Collection and Analysis for the Regional Indicators Initiative

May 28, 2013

 

Earlier this spring, LHB’s Rick Carter guest blogged about the Regional Indicators Initiative, a data collection and carbon tracking project for Minnesota cities. I sat down with him to learn more about data collection strategies, underlying assumptions, and how other regions could track metrics for sustainability.

PART 1

Anna: What were some of the challenges of nailing down which metrics were measurable?

Rick:

From early on, we considered waste, travel and non-travel energy, and water. Water and energy took on lives on their own and we were able to collect them by residential and commercial/industrial. Travel was already substantially measured by the state, so it was just a matter of harvesting that data and understanding it better.

We took a more rigorous approach going back to ask “now that we’ve established four metrics, which actions either taken by cities in general or by specific cities would affect the numbers?” We did a quick study of what data thought we could get and what the highest level of interaction would be, then performed a cross-check.

Anna: Did you consider collecting and including other metrics to correlate with other GreenStep Cities best practices?

Rick:

We’ve been capturing a whole set of readily available parallel data, including the area of each city, population, job counts, precipitation in inches, heating degree days, and cooling degree days.

Other groups have suggested additional metrics. Wastewater is one. Storm water is interesting, but I’m not sure it’s measurable. We haven’t found another metric that we felt was crucial, connected to GreenStep, and relatively easy to measure at the city scale. That’s not to say there aren’t, they just are not obvious.

Anna: Why did you decide to include waste as a metric?

Rick:

We picked metrics we could measure at a city scale with relative ease and had a substantial impact. Energy, travel, and water were clear choices. To calculate the carbon baseline using the ICELI Protocol, which is the current international standard, you must include waste, even though it’s a small slice of that carbon pie. The data is only available by county, so the standard allows you to prorate it.

Anna: Do you know of other ways to calculate consumption and embodied resources in consumer goods?

Rick:

The carbon implications of waste in our study include the direct handling of the waste and putting it in the landfill. But if you think about it, the complete lifecycle of everything going into the landfill contributes. Waste is a red herring in the way that it has all those implications. And it strikes me how so many sustainability plans–whether for a smaller organization like a company or a set of organizations like a city or a state–include a big section about waste, even though it represents a very small part of the carbon contribution.

Anna: I’m always curious about that.

Rick:

I think it’s in large part because we are connected to waste. We handle it and hold it and see it.

Anna: Whereas energy is less tangible.

Rick:

Yes, much less tangible. And maybe also because the more common elements of our environmental movement have focused on waste: pick up trash. Recycle. Those are more familiar actions.

Anna: You mentioned ICLEI as the current international standard.

Rick:

On the community scale, ICLEI is the commonly accepted protocol internationally. During our project, they rolled out their new methodology, so we redid all our calculations. That’s a lot of time spent on something that changes so subtly. But the protocol is very important to the City of Minneapolis. It’s not about comparing themselves to Maplewood or Falcon Heights, but to Seattle or Singapore or Stockholm. For credibility’s sake, they want to know that the same methodology is used.

A defining feature of the RII study is that we primarily focus on energy in BTUs, travel in miles, water in gallons, and waste in pounds. The more common way to measure these things is a rolled-up carbon metric of tons equivalent.

Anna: Would you say that the field is moving towards a common process to calculate carbon footprints?

Rick:

There are three main methodologies: geographic, transboundary, and consumption.

RII uses a geographic methodology, which a lot of people argue is limited and not necessarily fair. We essentially draw a line around the city, measure the things inside that boundary, and calculate their carbon output. Our numbers average around 18 tons per person per year.

When our study measures a trip, someone driving from A to B, using this geographic method; we measure the total miles inside the city. The transboundary method uses a very complex methodology to attribute chunks of the trip in different areas based on different percentages. And it adds other things like airline travel. That’s hard to explain to a city but there is a protocol. With the transboundary method, the output numbers are around 19 to 20 tons.

The researchers say that the consumption-based method is the most rigorous. That methodology considers the carbon implications of all an individual’s actions, between the driving of his car and the heating of his house and the buying of his shoes. Those numbers get up to 25 tons per person per year, which is more true in terms of measuring carbon.

Anna: Would you say that the geographic method reflects the travel activities of the city’s residents, or its investments in transportation infrastructure?

Rick:

Our ultimate goal is to help cities understand what to do. If I report the energy use of this building, the people who own and occupy it could take actions to reduce consumption and see the change. So how can a city encourage a person to take fewer trips or drive fewer miles? We don’t know in the same way as reducing energy in a building. If we were going to do one thing differently in terms of our carbon calculation, it would be travel. That could provide a better way of understanding what could be done.

A perfect example is the cities that will ultimately be on the currently planned light rail lines. Theoretically, that would impact the city’s travel over time. It’s hard to think about light rail as something that a city does, or as related back to a city. It’s more of a regional pattern. So it will be interesting to see what the changes in the cities that are on the lines versus the cities that are off the lines.

Anna: What were the major challenges in obtaining the different end use energy data?

Rick:

In the beginning, we stumbled by asking the utilities for the data ourselves. They gave us no response, or definite no’s. After a few months, we had an ah-ha moment: the cities needed to ask the utility companies. We drafted a template letter asking each city’s utility company to verify service and provide residential consumption data separate from commercial/industrial, and each district energy provider for their total output in either therms, kW, or pounds. We gave that form letter to each of the cities and maintained a spreadsheet with each city and each of their utilities, to track the dates that they sent their letters and the dates that the data came back to us.

Most of the utility companies were cooperative. There were a couple little oddball glitches. In one community there had been a change: a portion of their city had been served by a muni and now was served by an investor-owned utility. So receiving partial data that varied from year to year over the four years got to be tricky. But it was very much the exception.

Anna: That’s encouraging for other people working on similar initiatives.

Rick:

Yes, but we still have a few hurdles to overcome.

For example, Xcel Energy operates with the 15/15 rule for data aggregation. When they give anyone a dataset, in our case they give us a sheet: one year for one city. If there are less than fifteen users in any premise type, they are excluded from the dataset. For example, if ten households in a small community sign up to pay for wind-source, their consumption is excluded. And if any one user in that utility type, in that dataset, uses more than 15% of the energy, Xcel excludes them. The standard is to protect consumer privacy, so Xcel does not name the excluded consumers.

We’re trying to figure out a way to work around it by the way that we ask for the info. It doesn’t vary the data, but consistently impacts each city it affects over the four years. Although we don’t even know that: one user could use 14% of the energy one year and 16% the next.

Anna: And so they wouldn’t appear in the second year’s dataset?

Rick:

Right. We found out about the standard because we had already obtained 2008 and 2009 data for one of the pilot cities. When we went back and had all twenty cities ask for four years of data, that city’s new data was substantially different than the old information from those years.

So that’s an example of a challenge. In a couple other instances, we received information, data that came back. One utility company had a major pattern of inconsistency, where multiple cities had drastically more or less usage in the first two years than the second two years, with the same premise counts. Once we started putting these numbers in charts and graphs, it became pretty obvious. After we asked several times, they acknowledged they had a problem, but it took them months to get the reworked data.

Anna: Why is it important to normalize by jobs, population, households, and weather? Did you think about other factors to consider?

Rick:

Some people like to see the information normalized. It helps when comparing one city to another or a group of cities to a different group of cities. Someone may ask, for example, “is it really fair to compare this city to that city? Because one grew a lot and the other didn’t.” In that case, she could take the residential energy consumption and compare it on a per-person or per-household basis.

It’s useful but not necessarily critical. To me, total energy use is the pattern we’re trying to reduce. Straight up. I see two ways to mitigate climate change. One way is to make the grid cleaner in order to provide the same number of BTUs with less carbon output. Many people are working on that, and we’re making considerable progress but not enough. The other important way is to reduce the consumption number, whatever the baseline.

Anna: Do you have any advice for other metro areas planning similar initiatives?

Rick:

The first thing is to be organized. We did it in an ad hoc way. Looking back, I don’t know that we could have done anything differently. But if a new region were going to start, I would suggest having the Met Council or the State or the counties ask for the information. Make fewer requests and specify exactly how you want the information, instead of naming the output you want and letting each utility company do it a certain way.

Also, consider using practices that allow us to share the information from region to region. Not necessarily using all the the same methods as we did in our project. But for example, rather than calculations in therms/household and kW/household, work in btus/household so we can compare from region to region.

To read related posts on this link.

Posted by Anna Jursik, Program Assistant, Center for Energy and Environment (CEE)
Date May 28, 2013

+  LHB moving to Loose-Wiles building, May 23, 2013

LHB moving to Loose-Wiles building

May 23, 2013

Architecture and engineering firm LHB has signed a lease to move to the Loose-Wiles building at 701 Washington Ave. N. in the North Loop area of Minneapolis. Bloomington-based United Properties acquired the property in July 2012.

LHB, which has offices in Duluth and Minneapolis, is currently located at 250 Third Ave. N. in Minneapolis.

Bill Katter, executive vice president with United Properties, said that LHB has signed a 10-year lease for the building’s second floor. He said that the deal allows LHB to “grow into” the space of approximately 16,000 square feet.

The building was empty when United Properties acquired it last year. RJM Construction relocated to the building from St. Louis Park. RJM and United Properties are both part of the Bloomington-based Marquette Real Estate Group.

The St. Paul-based Blue Plate Restaurant Co. plans to open a new restaurant, the Loose-Wiles Freehouse, in the building. Katter said that LHB would move to the building in late summer and the restaurant is slated to open this fall.

“We’re about 50 percent leased at this point,” Katter said. “We have a number of prospects interested. … It’s one of these dynamic historic buildings.”

Posted: 5:10 pm Thu, May 23, 2013
By Burl Gilyard, Finance & Commerce

+  Work done at ex-brownfield site on Detro..., May 18, 2013

Work done at ex-brownfield site on Detroit River

May 18, 2013

 

TRENTON,  Mich. (AP) — Major environmental restoration work has been completed on a former  industrial site along the Detroit River, officials announced Saturday.

Wayne  County, the U.S.  Fish and Wildlife Service and others have been working for nearly a decade  on the restoration of the Detroit  River International Wildlife Refuge Gateway in Trenton.

Located  on the river’s Trenton Channel, it was the site of a Chrysler manufacturing  facility that was deactivated in 1990. The gateway sits next to the Humbug Marsh — the last mile of natural shoreline on the U.S. mainland of the  Detroit River.

“We’ve  spent nine years cleaning up this site. It’s pretty amazing. … It’s pretty  unusual,” refuge manager John  Hartig told The  Associated Press.

The  project included restoring 25 acres of potential animal habitats and 16 acres of  wetlands in an area that had lost 97 percent of its coastal wetlands. It also  controlled invasive species on 50 acres of upland habitats and 2.5 miles  of shoreline.

The  gateway work is to be among the topics discussed later Saturday at an annual  benefit dinner at the Edsel  and Eleanor Ford House in Grosse Pointe Shores.

In  addition, refuge officials plan to tell attendees that 95 percent of the  architecture and engineering work required for the design of a visitor center at  the gateway has been completed.

The  refuge itself includes more than 5,700 acres along 48 miles of the lower Detroit  River and western Lake Erie.

The  focus of the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge is on conserving,  protecting and restoring habitat for a range of native fish and wildlife and  their habitats and bills itself as the first international refuge in North  America and one of a few urban ones in the nation.

A May 2013 rendering provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows the  new Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge visitor center in Trenton, Mich.  The refuge incorporates nearly 5,800 acres along 48 miles of the lower Detroit  River and western Lake Erie and focuses on conserving, protecting, and restoring  habitat for a broad range of native fish and wildlife and their habitats. It is  the first international refuge in North America and one of a few urban ones in  the nation. Photo: U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service, HOPD

Link to Article and Rendering

SFGate – San Francisco Chronicle
Updated 10:25 am, Saturday, May 18, 2013

+  McKnight and AIA MN announce 2013 Afford..., May 16, 2013

McKnight and AIA MN announce 2013 Affordable Housing Design award winner

May 16, 2013

At a reception held on Wednesday, May15, AIA Minnesota and The McKnight Foundation announced that the architectural firm, LHB, Inc., and their community partner, Aeon, received the 2013 Affordable Housing Design Award for the Renaissance Box project located in Saint Paul. Recognized at the reception was Michael Fischer, AIA, principal, Minneapolis office, LHB, Inc., for the LHB, Inc. team and Arthur Alan, president, Aeon, for the Aeon team.

Aeon selected LHB for the rehabilitation of the historic O’Donnell Shoe Company into affordable rental housing in downtown St. Paul. Constructed in 1914, the seven story brick and concrete building has been converted into seventy efficiency, one, and two bedroom apartments. The historic character of the structure’s concrete mushroom columns is celebrated in the wide, daylit corridors. Community spaces are located in a new first floor addition with glazing that provides a connection
with both the street and the interior courtyard.

The design team worked with the State Historic Preservation Office to meet the requirements of the National Park Service while at the same time targeting LEED NC Gold Certification. Many sustainable strategies are used in the design, notably resource conservation by the adaptive re-use of an existing building and the project’s urban location adjacent to public transportation and amenities within walking distance. Additional sustainable principles include an energy-efficient heating and air conditioning system to minimize operating costs, innovative landscape features and a vegetated roof to keep stormwater on-site, and encouraging use of alternative transportation by eliminating parking. The building received LEED NC Gold Certification in January 2013.

Link to full announcement.

+  Minneapolis Downtown Greening Award Winn..., May 6, 2013

Minneapolis Downtown Greening Award Winners

May 6, 2013

 

Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District Presents Third Annual Greening Awards to Recognize Organizations Committed to Improving Downtown’s Public Realm Through Greening.

Minneapolis, May 6, 2013 – The Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District (DID) is proud to announce the winners of its third annual Greening Awards. A recognition program initiated by the DID’s Greening Committee, the awards were established to pay tribute to community greening champions in Downtown Minneapolis, and to demonstrate how both small and large greening and public realm projects can transform our environment. The Greening and Public Realm Awards recognize property owners, businesses, and community groups who have created and maintained public green spaces that help to enhance Downtown Minneapolis. The program honored twenty winners at an award ceremony on May 6th.

“The last US census showed that more people live in cities today (80.7%) than at any time in our history. And in Minneapolis, our fastest growing neighborhood is downtown, where we plan to add 35,000 residents by 2025. Unlike our world-class park system that weaves
thru our city’s neighborhoods, downtown is lacking in parks and green space to support these new residents.” said David Wilson, Managing Partner at Accenture and Chair of the DID Greening and Public Realm Committee. “Fortunately, our community is proactively planning new downtown parks and the renovation of existing public realm amenities to make sure that our city competes successfully for new residents, jobs and visitors. These 3rd Annual Greening and Public Realm Awards celebrate outstanding examples of downtown greening, and are intended to inspire all of us to work towards making downtown a greener and more vibrant place.”

The DID Greening Committee nominated and recognized places that were exemplary in categories ranging from large to small, and summer to winter. The Greening Award categories and recipients are:

  • Best Entryway, Large Scale –Target Corporation & Tangletown Gardens for the Target Plaza South Entry
  • Best Entryway, Small Scale – Gluek’s Restaurant & Bar
  • Best Park – Target Field
  • Best Park – Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board for the North 4th Ave Playground
  • Best Plaza –Minneapolis Community and Technical College & LHB Inc. for the MCTC Fine Arts Plaza
  • Best Window Boxes, Large Scale – Ryan Companies US, Inc. on behalf of Franklin Street Properties & Plants by Design for TCF Tower.
  • Best Window Boxes, Small Scale – Café Lurcat
  • Best Parking Lot – Lunds Hennepin Parking Lot & Rain Garden
  • Best Outdoor Café – Loring Kitchen
  • Best Storefront Greening – Rosa Mexicano
  • Best Streetscape Greening – Minneapolis Convention Center
  • Best Urban Agriculture – MCTC Urban Farm Collective
  • Best Multiple Property – D’Amico Partners for Masa and Café Lurcat
  • Community Involvement – Loring Greenway Association
  • Best Winter Greening, Large Scale – Campbell Mithun Tower and Lyndale Plant Services
  • Best Winter Greening, Small Scale – Lyon’s Pub & Hearts and Flowers

Encore Awards are awarded to those entities that have exhibited exemplary contribution to the public realm environment of downtown consistently, year after year. The 2012 Encore awards were presented to:

  • Encore Award – The Local and Your Enchanted Florist for the sidewalk café greening at The Local
  • Encore Award – St Olaf Catholic Church for the hidden idyll Assisi on 9th
  • Encore Award – Marquette Plaza for Cancer Survivors Park
  • Encore Award – Brit’s Pub & Vincent A Restaurant for the sidewalk café greening.

For more information about the DID Greening Committee, services, initiatives and volunteer opportunities, visit www.minneapolisdid.com.

The Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District (DID) is a nonprofit entity that maintains a higher standard of care and behavior throughout 120 blocks of downtown. It was formed in early 2009 after more than five years of formative planning and advocacy by the downtown business community.

###

+  Mortensen, LHB named project contractors, April 2, 2013

Mortensen, LHB named project contractors

April 2, 2013

 

Mortensen Construction and Duluth-based LHB have been selected as contractors for
the  $28.9 downtown multi-modal transit center in Duluth, it was announced
Monday.

The facility will provide a waiting area for passengers using Duluth Transit
Authority buses and inter-city bus lines, bicycle storage, Skywalk connections
to the downtown and the DECC, a Wells Fargo drive-though and other amenities.

To learn more about the project go tohttp://www.duluthtransit.com/content/pdf/misc/multimodal_brochure.pdf

Published April 02, 2013
BusinessNorth.com

+  LHB, Mortenson to design, build Duluth t..., April 1, 2013

LHB, Mortenson to design, build Duluth transit hub

April 1, 2013

 

The Duluth Transit Authority has turned to two well-known companies to design and build its planned transportation hub downtown.

LHB Engineers and Architects of Duluth will handle the design work for the $28.9 million project. Mortenson Construction of Minneapolis will be lead contractor.

LHB has worked on many local projects, including Lake Superior College’s Academic Student Center and numerous road and bridge projects. Mortenson was lead contractor on the construction of Amsoil Arena. It also built Target Field in Minneapolis, and earlier this year was named construction manager for the multipurpose stadium that will house the Minnesota Vikings.

The DTA announced the selection of LHB and Mortenson at a City Hall news conference Monday afternoon.

“I can’t tell you how excited we are to be selected for this project,” Daniel Mehls, Mortenson vice president of project development, said.

Groundbreaking for the new center at Third Avenue West and Michigan Street is scheduled for the fall with the demolition of the Wells Fargo parking ramp and Salter Building. The completion of the center is projected for November 2014. The timeline “is aggressive but reasonable,” Mehls said.

Mortenson completed Target Field three months early.

“We’ve been tracking this project for many years,” working with LHB to form a partnership, he said.

The DTA has worked for several years to reach this point, DTA General Manager Dennis Jensen said.

“We’re excited; this is going to be fun,” he said.

The DTA project will be paid for with $16 million in federal funding, $6 million in state funding, and $6.9 million in local and private investment funding. Mehls said Mortenson is committed to working with local subcontractors and workers on the project.

When completed, Duluth’s Multimodal Transportation Center will include an indoor bus terminal with an eight-bay boarding platform for local, regional and intercity carriers, along with passenger-waiting areas and public restrooms. The center will include a bike-storage area, police substation, parking ramp with public hourly and contract parking, and a Wells Fargo drive-through banking center.

“There are a lot of exciting elements to this project” that will transform the downtown, Mayor Don Ness said.

The project will require some street closures, but those closures should be minimal and short, Jensen said.

A bigger concern is how to minimize the disruption that building a new skywalk over Interstate 35 to connect the downtown with the DECC. The project’s partners are still considering options, which include building a new skywalk alongside the current one or tearing down the existing skywalk and building the new one in its place.

However, “the pilings on the current skywalk are not all the way down to bedrock” Jensen said.

“Everything is open to exploration,” he said. “It all depends on cost.”

Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce President and CEO David Ross called the planned center “a great step forward for the downtown and for the efficiency of transportation,” but as a member of the DECC board of directors he’s very interested in minimizing the disruption of the Northwest Passage skywalk.

“But we understand sometimes you have to a step back to move forward,” he said.

Published April 01, 2013, 03:13 PM
Duluth News Tribune

+  The Regional Indicators Initiative: Metr..., March 26, 2013

The Regional Indicators Initiative: Metrics to Promote Sustainability

March 26, 2013

 

Good intentions and big ideas aren’t enough to carry out an environmental initiative: effective programs and policies track key metrics to achieve and demonstrate sustainability. Efforts ranging from the Kyoto Protocol tocorporate sustainability programs use data to establish benchmarks, gauge progress, and determine success. 

i.e. is pleased to feature an example of data collection and analysis in support of the Minnesota GreenStep Cities Program, designed to improve sustainability and quality of life at the city level. Rick Carter, Senior Vice President in LHB’s Minneapolis office and LEED Fellow, works extensively on issues of sustainable design by promoting improved indoor air quality, energy efficiency, and resource efficiency. In this post, Rick describes theRegional Indicators Initiative and outlines key findings so far.

PERFORMANCE METRICS TO PROMOTE EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

To achieve certification through the GreenStep Cities Program, a city must meet minimum requirements and choose from twenty-eight best practices designed to improve its sustainability. GreenStep tracks which practices cities have adopted, but does not currently have a method of tracking how effectively these strategies have ‘moved the needle’ towards sustainability.

The desire to measure the impacts of sustainable practices led to a collaborative project, the Regional Indicators Initiative (RII), managed by LHB for the Urban Land Institute of Minnesota. The RII was conceived as a way to track the progress of cities involved in the GreenStep Cities Program. It measures annual performance metrics for twenty Minnesota cities committed to increasing their overall efficiency and sustainability. The Initiative supports planning for sustainability by defining a baseline, tracking a business-as-usual trajectory, establishing targets, and measuring outcomes of sustainable strategies at a city-wide scale.

This team developed a pilot to determine what citywide data can be collected annually to effectively measure progress towards sustainability. Three cities – St. Louis Park, Falcon Heights, and Edina – funded the study and volunteered to release their resource-use data for a period of 2008-2010.  The pilot study proved that four indicators of city-wide sustainability: energy, water, VMT and waste can be measured, gathered, and analyzed in a reasonable period of time.

The participant cities represent over a quarter of Minnesota’s population (27%) and include municipalities of varying types, from large, central cities to inner and outer-ring suburbs of various sizes and population densities. The list of participant cities continues to grow, along with the awareness that maintaining a continuous database of consumption patterns is an essential task for measuring actual (rather than predicted) progress in sustainability.

WHICH DATA IS COLLECTED?

RII collects the following data that reflects the activities of the people who live, work, learn, travel, visit, and recreate within the city’s geographical boundaries for the years 2008-2011, with 2012 data coming soon.

UPCOMING PLATFORM TO DELVE DEEPER INTO THE DATA

Beyond these findings, there are many others that can be discovered through manipulation of the data from different angles. The website being developed will provide an interactive chart to explore this data. Either one city or a number of cities can be compared, for all four years or simply one year. This data can be viewed as a total or normalized by factors of: number of household, number of jobs, population or weather factors. This website is scheduled to be released in April 2013

To read the full blog click on this link.

Posted by Anna Jursik, Program Assistant, Center for Energy and Environment (CEE)
Date March 26, 2013

+  LHB Staff News, March 18, 2013

LHB Staff News

March 18, 2013

 

Duluth, MN (March 18, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Mark Johnson joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician with the Public Works/Structures Group. Johnson has been working at LHB for the past year as a part-time Engineering Technician on land survey projects for pipeline and utility companies, and public agencies. Johnson has an Associate’s Degree in Building Construction Technology from Lake Superior College.

Jordan Cabak joins our Minneapolis Office as a Senior Designer with the Public Works/Structures Group. Cabak has over six years of civil design experience. Cabak graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. He has experience working with city transportation planning and engineering departments working on street reconstruction and traffic improvement initiatives, and has also been involved in site designs for various types of projects.

Jeff Roberts joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician with the Pipeline Group. Roberts has been working at LHB for the past year as a part-time Architectural Technician’s Assistant providing REDICHECK reviews for drawing accuracy, drawing details in AutoCAD 3D, and cataloguing the firm’s project library. Roberts has an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Architectural Technology from Lake Superior College and is adept in Revit Architecture 2012.

Cassie Fulda joins our Duluth Office as an Administrative Assistant with the Public Works/Structures Group. Fulda graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Superior with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education. Prior to joining LHB, Fulda worked at Enbridge Energy supporting their compliance and risk processes.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  CCC putting focus on sustainability, March 18, 2013

CCC putting focus on sustainability

March 18, 2013

 

Central Community College wants to reduce its carbon footprint and become an environmentally sustainable institution.

That commitment can be seen in the GEM electric vehicles — two on the Hastings Campus and one on the Columbus campus — that maintenance staff now use. It also can bee seen in the solar panels that provide 17 kilowatts of power to the Merrick Building on the Hastings Campus.

Another indication is the approval by the CCC Board of Governors to purchase four Ford Fusion hybrid vehicles for the college. And that commitment was demonstrated in the board’s decision to build the new Health Science Center addition with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards.

But the biggest sign that Central Community College wants to reduce its carbon footprint and become a environmentally sustainable institution was the decision to hire Minetta Khan as the school’s sustainability coordinator.

“That’s paying for somebody for 40 hours per week and their benefits,” said Khan, who has been in her job for about eight months. “That’s a major commitment.”

Khan credits Greg Smith, the president for Central Community College’s 25-county area, with wanting to make sustainability a priority for everyone at the college.

College officials also want to invite people from the community to learn more about sustainability and possibly implement measures to decrease their own carbon footprint, Khan said. To help encourage environmentally friendly practices for both the college and the community, Central Community College is hosting a sustainability series.

The Sustainability Leadership Presentation Series began in March, when Elizabeth Turner and Rick Carter, who work on sustainable design for the Minneapolis-based architecture and engineering firm LHB.

On March 4, Turner presented two sessions. The first was “Integrating Sustainability Into College Planning” and the second was “Benchmarking and Goal Setting” Using Data to Prioritize Decision Making.”

On March 5, Turner and Carter jointly presented two sessions: “The Basis of Sustainable Design” and “Designing for Sustainable Communities.”

Khan said the Sustainability Leadership Presentation Series is scheduled to be on the fourth Monday of each month, so the next presentation will be March 25 in the West Education Center, Room 205, at the Columbus Campus.

That session, “Sustainability: Not a Spectator Sport,” will feature personal perspectives on people, work, leadership and integration of sustainability practices and principles from CCC employees.

Four employees, Andrea Hays, activities director at the Hastings Campus; Mark Funkey, drafting instructor at the Grand Island Campus; Alan Hartley, dean of educational services at the Hastings Campus; and Steve Heinisch, biological instructor at the Columbus Campus, will be speaking at the CCC-Columbus program.

The presentation also will be streamed live to CCC’s campuses in Grand Island and Hastings and its centers in Holdrege, Kearney and Lexington. A question-and-answer session will follow at all CCC locations.

Individuals may choose to attend or view those employee presentations either from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. or from 6:30 to 8 p.m. They also may stream the session on their own computers, provided they have at least a 3 MB/s Internet connection and they register.

All presentations are free. All interested individuals are asked to register by calling (877) 222-0780 weekdays before 5 p.m. and asking for the local Extended Learning Services office. Current and prior students may also register online. People who want more information or to register online may go to www.cccneb.edu/sustain.

Because the fourth Monday in May will be Memorial Day, the May presentation will be June 3, Khan said.

She said that achieving sustainability is a long-term process. Even before a formal commitment was made to becoming sustainable, Central Community College had been moving toward environmentally friendly policies for quite some time.

For example, CCC business manager Larry Glazier said that when the Gosper Building was demolished on the Hastings Campus, both the concrete and brick were recycled. Glazier said he believes that decision probably reduced the waste going into the landfill by 90 percent.

He said that the Health Science Center addition on the Grand Island Campus was designed with LEED standards in mind. At the time, he said, LEED was offering four levels: bronze, silver, gold and platinum.

Glazier said the CCC board decided to build to the bronze level, but it did not get the building certified as a LEED building. “It would have cost $1 to $2 per square foot,” he said, noting that the platinum certification likely would have been at the high end of that spectrum and bronze at the low end.

Even at the low end, certification would have cost about $45,000.

Still, the Health Science Center addition featured “light harvesting,” which means that if enough light filled the room, the electric lights would be shut off. While the building was designed to allow some sunlight in the building for illumination purpose, some of the building’s design features directed the sun’s rays away, so there is not undue solar heating during the summer months.

The solar panels for the Merrick Building are another way to reduce electrical consumption. Glazier said three of the panels were designed to follow the sun and another three panels are in a fixed position, although the elevation or tilt of the panels can be adjusted depending on the time of the year.

He said the panels were placed on the ground, not the roof, and away from buildings so they could be used for educational instruction for CCC students.

Khan said if an institution wants to reduce its carbon footprint, there are two major areas of focus. She said one is to cut electrical use in buildings because so much electricity is generated by coal-fired power plants.

That’s why the energy-efficient Health Science Center and the solar panels for the Merrick Building on the Hastings Campus are notable, she said.

The second area of focus is on an institution’s vehicle fleet and gas mileage. The purchase of the four Ford Fusion hybrids fits that philosophy, Khan said.

CCC purchasing manager Marilyn Bottrell said the CCC Board of Governors made a deliberate decision to buy hybrid cars, even though that meant paying a higher initial price. However, it appears the higher price may be recouped in as little as two years. Although board members opted to buy four hybrid cars this fiscal year, Bottrell said, they did not make a blanket commitment to only buying hybrids in the future.

She said the decision on whether to buy a hybrid vehicle or a conventional gasoline-powered vehicle will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Khan said the GEM vehicles are environmentally friendly in that they do not have fumes that will be breathed in by the driver or anybody in the immediate vicinity. However, she said that plugging in to the electric grid means the GEM is being recharged by a coal-fired plant.

She noted the carbon footprint could be slightly greater or smaller depending on how long it takes the GEM to recharge. Khan said the carbon footprint of recharging on the electric grid likely will shrink over time as wind turbines and other sources of green or renewable energy play a greater role in generating electricity.

Khan noted lots of people talk about “carbon capture” from coal-fired plants, but that technology still appears to be many years in the future before it becomes viable.

Khan said CCC President Greg Smith has signed “The President’s Climate Change Commitment” and has also made Central Community College a member of SEED, which seeks to “advance sustainability and green workforce development practices at community colleges.”

Posted: Saturday, March 16, 2013 11:00 pm by Harold Reutterharold.reutter@theindependent.com

+  Two Duluth Businesses Say They’re ..., February 4, 2013

Two Duluth Businesses Say They’re Growing… and Hiring

February 4, 2013

 

Duluth, MN (NNCNOW) – It’s time, says Barr Engineering, to change the reputation Duluth has gained in the past few years.

“Duluth may have this reputation of not having jobs, and it’s just not true,” said Branch Office Coordinator Sheryl Filby Williams, “especially in the engineering sector.”

Filby Williams says the environmental consulting and engineering services firm has seen significant growth in recent years, with a combined total of 165 employees currently serving their Hibbing and Duluth offices—and there’s room for more.

“In 2012, we hired 25 full–time employees here, in Duluth, and we have 10 positions open right now in our [Duluth] office,” said Filby Williams.

The firm, whose recent projects include the Clyde Industrial Park, won an award in 2011 for being the best environmental services firm to work for in the country, which Filby Williams attributes to their employee–owned business model.

“People really feel invested in the success of Barr, in Duluth—in our local community,” said Filby Williams.

And just down the road, at the engineering and architecture firm, LHB, it’s more good news from a growing company in the midst of what they call regional economic growth.

“We’re very optimistic about the future,” said LHB CEO Bill Bennett, “and where things are going for our company and our region.”

Bennett says the Duluth–based firm is no stranger to the area, having overseen everything from the DECC construction in 1966 with 7 employees to Northland road and bridge repairs following the 2012 flood.

“I can walk down the block and I can always point out a project that we’ve been involved in,” said Bennett.

In 2012, LHB added a net of 45 additional people, bringing the firm to a total of 205 employees: “That’s us building faster and sooner than many in our industry,” said Bennett.

…and the best part? They, too, are still hiring.

Officials with both firms added that anyone can learn more about their employment opportunities on their websites.

– Posted to the Web by Billy Wagness

www.northlandsnewscenter.com

Link to online version

+  LHB Staff News, January 17, 2013

LHB Staff News

January 17, 2013

Duluth, MN (January 17, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Adam Flanagan joins our Duluth Office as a Mechanical Designer with the Industrial Group. Flanagan recently graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. He has experience in the pulp and paper, mining, and construction machinery industries.

Mark Madden joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Senior Technician with the Public Works/Structures Group. Madden has a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management from ITT Technical Institute. He has over nine years of experience in construction management, administration, quality assurance, and inspection services in the transportation sector, and over 14 years of design and drafting experience.

Kyle Marynik joins our Duluth Office as a Structural Designer with the Public Works/Structures Group. After interning at LHB last summer, Marynik recently graduated on the Dean’s List from Michigan Technological University with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He also graduated with Cum Laude Honors from the University of North Dakota with a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Announces New Shareholders, January 10, 2013

LHB Announces New Shareholders

January 10, 2013

 

Duluth, MN (January 10, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce that Jeremy Clarke, Structural Senior Engineer, and Jason Mangan, Mechanical Project Manager have been elected as LHB Shareholders.

Jeremy Clarke, PE, has over 14 years of experience in civil engineering with an emphasis on structural design and analysis in the industrial sector. Clarke’s design proficiency includes steel, concrete, timber, and masonry structures. In his project management experience with LHB, Clarke coordinates the design process to ensure completion of construction plans and specifications on time and within budget. Clarke’s role requires frequent communication with the client, contractor, public agencies, and other consultants.

Jason Mangan, PE, has over 14 years of experience in mechanical engineering for pipeline and heavy industrial design and construction. His background includes project management, construction management, project scope development, estimating and scheduling, and piping design including layout, material specification, and takeoffs. Mangan’s knowledge of piping, tanks, and industrial equipment comes from projects ranging from new construction, critical path outages, and emergency repairs in the pipeline, paper, and bulk materials handling industries.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Staff News, January 3, 2013

LHB Staff News

January 3, 2013

Duluth, MN (January 3, 2013) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Eric Nistler, joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Intermediate Technician with the Pipeline Group. Nistler has four years of experience and studied mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota. 

Brooke Donahue, joins our Minneapolis Office as a designer with the Landscape Architecture and Planning Group. Donahue has over 10 years of design experience and is an American Society of Landscape Architecture Associate Member

Michael Schlenvogt, joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician with the Public Works/Structures Group. Schlenvogt has six years of experience and studied architectural technology at Scottsdale Community College in Arizona.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Building, design firms seeing a lift in ..., December 21, 2012

Building, design firms seeing a lift in business

December 21, 2012

All in all, 2012 has been a pretty good year for LHB.

The architecture, engineering and planning firm, which has offices in Minneapolis and Duluth, has seen about a 20 percent growth in revenue since 2011 and has added 45 employees, company officials say.

Bill Bennett, the company’s CEO, said LHB has come through the recession, in part, because it has been nimble enough to take on a variety of projects, from infrastructure work to housing to government jobs.

“We have been able to adapt and be flexible. We are pretty diverse,” Bennett said.

National reports on construction starts and architecture billings released this week show things are picking up for the building industry as a whole.

McGraw-Hill Construction reported this week that contracts for future construction in Minnesota were up 47 percent in November and 22 percent for the year, with a big assist from residential construction.

In the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, total nonresidential building ticked up 11 percent in November, and residential more than doubled compared with November 2011, with $463.43 million in contracts for future construction, up from $209.53 million.

Year-to-date in Minneapolis-St. Paul, total construction is up 23 percent, according to McGraw-Hill.

Not all the signs are positive, however. In November, nonresidential construction in Minnesota dipped 12 percent, and non-building projects, including streets, highways and bridges, tumbled 40 percent from a year ago.

Meanwhile, the American Institute of Architects said this week that its architecture billings index, a barometer of future construction spending throughout the United States, advanced in November for the fourth consecutive month.

The November index was 53.2, up from 52.8 in October. Any reading over 50 indicates an increase in billings, AIA said.

Across the country, the best-performing sector in November was multifamily residential (55.9), followed by mixed practice (53.9), commercial/industrial (52.0) and institutional (50.5), AIA said.

“These are the strongest business conditions we have seen since the end of 2007 before the construction market collapse,” AIA chief economist Kermit Baker said in a news release.

“The real question now is if the federal budget situation gets cleared up, which will likely lead to the green-lighting of numerous projects currently on hold,” Baker said. “If we do end up going off the ‘fiscal cliff,’ then we can expect a significant setback for the entire design and construction industry.”

In a positive sign for local homebuilders, the median price of a “non-distressed” home in the Twin Cities rose to $211,995 in November, up 11 percent from November 2011, according to the University of St. Thomas Residential Real Estate Price Report Index.

“The imbalance between the supply and demand of homes for sale, combined with historically low interest rates and a steady economy, will continue to put upward pressure on median sale prices,” said Herb Tousley, director of real estate programs at the University of St. Thomas.

At LHB, one sign of progress is its employment growth.

Pre-recession employment peaked at about 180, Bennett said. In January 2012, the company employed about 160 people, but that number has since grown to 205, not including temporary summer interns, he said.

LHB’s recent clients include Sage Electrochromics, Essentia Health, Lake Superior College, the Minnesota Department of Transportation and the Veterans Administration, among others.

“We are truly a reflection of our clients’ success. … We feel extremely fortunate. As you look over the recession, I feel we got hit probably less than many in our industry,” Bennett said.

Posted: 12:20 pm Fri, December 21, 2012
By  BRIAN JOHNSON

+  LHB Staff News, December 18, 2012

LHB Staff News

December 18, 2012

 

Duluth, MN (December 18, 2012) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Thomas Johnson, joins our Duluth Office as a Structural Senior Engineer with the Industrial Group. Johnson has over eight years of engineering experience.

Christina Wagner, joins our Minneapolis Office as a Design Specialist with the Healthcare Group. Wagner has over 24 years of architectural design experience.

Michael Villa, joins our Duluth Office as a Safety Specialist with the Human Resource Department. Villa has a Master in Environmental Health and Safety from the University of Minnesota, Duluth and is a member of the Minnesota Safety Council.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Bill Bennett Comments on Duluth’s ..., November 27, 2012

Bill Bennett Comments on Duluth’s Economic Revival

November 27, 2012

Read or listen to the full story on MPR

Duluth showing signs of economic revival

by Dan Kraker, Minnesota Public Radio

November 27, 2012

DULUTH, Minn. — A giant aircraft maintenance hangar at Duluth International Airport that has sat idle for six years is springing back to life this week, a sign that the region’s economy is on the upswing.

AAR Corp. is servicing jets from Air Canada in the facility, originally built in the 1990s for Northwest Airlines.

“When we’re up and running, there should be three aircraft in here at all times coming and going on a regular schedule,” AAR Vice President Danny Martinez said.

After years of economic struggles and budget deficits, Duluth may be poised for a new era of prosperity. The city has announced several major industry investments in the area, the unemployment rate has dropped to 5.9 percent and the local economy is diversifying.

Business and civic leaders are more optimistic about the city’s future than they’ve been in decades, and they point to the aircraft hanger as a sign of improving economic conditions.

When fully operational the facility will employ 225 workers. Martinez said the building was only part of the reason the company chose Duluth for its new facility.

“There was a lot of experienced folks here that we could bring on, and that’s a unique combination,” he said.

The aircraft hanger is among a number of strong signs for Duluth’s economy. In September, Mayor Don Ness announced another major new project: a new downtown office tower to be anchored by the clothing retailer Maurice’s. The company plans to add 100 jobs in Duluth over the next few years.

In praising the project, Ness, 39, said the announcement marked “an exciting day in the history of our community.”

The mayor’s sunny outlook stems in part from his youth, when the sun seemed to have set over Duluth.

In the early 1980s, the city’s unemployment rate soared to nearly 20 percent, then the second-highest the nation, notes University of Minnesota economist Jim Skurla.

Skurla recalls that on a billboard along Interstate 35 out of town someone even posted a billboard with a now infamous message: “The last one out, please turn out the lights.”

Those memories are still vivid for Ness.

“I grew up in a Duluth that was very different, when Duluth was one of the 10 most distressed cities in the nation — super-high unemployment rate, a sense of pessimism all around us,” he said.

Ness credits his predecessors with laying the foundation for the revival he sees today. He said the city took advantage of the scenic power of Lake Superior by building a lake walk and creating the Canal Park tourist district that helped revitalize its downtown.

More recently, Ness has battled with retired city workers to cut the cost of their health care coverage, and erased huge multi-year budget deficits. He said those steps have helped foster a newfound sense of optimism.

“Companies like Maurice’s don’t invest $30 million in downtowns of small cities unless they sense the confidence that’s here now, that we have something special here, that you can’t create in the suburbs,” Ness said. “We’re starting to translate those advantages into economic development, into job creation, into a sense of confidence that leads people to make important investments.”

But it’s a slow process and not all change is positive. Although the unemployment rate in the Duluth Metropolitan statistical area which includes Superior, Wisconsin and St. Louis County, the unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in four years, the region has 5,000 fewer jobs than in 2008.

New jobs are on their way, but in August, Georgia Pacific closed a hardboard plant and laid off 141 workers.

“Duluth has always had this tradition of taking two steps forward, then one step back,” said Skurla, director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at UM Duluth.

Duluth’s economy has always been dominated by the three “Ts”: taconite, timber and tourism. But Skurla said that is slowly changing, spurred in part by new entrepreneurship.

“We’ve always said kind of as a joke that Duluth was always an economy of workers. We worked for the steel industry; we worked for different industries here that have disappeared,” he said. “And entrepreneurism wasn’t built into our genes initially, our DNA.”

Today, however, Duluth has a more diverse economy, with strong health care, education, and professional services sectors.

“A lot of the business growth that you truly in the back office see, but don’t hear about a lot, is those of us that are adding one or two or three jobs continually, every month,” said Bill Bennett, CEO of LHB, an engineering and architecture firm that employs 205 people. “It’s not the home run.”

Bennett said his company has added 40 employees in the last two years alone. For him, a big challenge for Duluth is attracting a talented workforce.

Historically, local companies have hired people with connections to Duluth, Bennett said.

But some are growing so fast they have to reach beyond that group.

“We bring in a lot of folks to be educated here in the Twin Ports, then unfortunately we hand them that degree, they pack their bags and leave,” said Brian Hanson, president of the economic development organization APEX. “That’s a tide we need to stem.”

That remains one of the top priorities for Ness. After decades of struggle, the mayor said the city can now afford to focus on things like arts, culture and outdoor recreation.

Those efforts, Ness said, could help keep its college graduates and attract other workers Duluth needs to fuel a growing economy.

+  Bill Bennett Receives Award from Univers..., November 16, 2012

Bill Bennett Receives Award from University of Minnesota Duluth

November 16, 2012

Duluth, MN (November 16, 2012) – LHB Chief Executive Officer, Bill Bennett, received the University of Minnesota Duluth’s (UMD) Swenson College of Science and Engineering (SCSE) Recognition Award at UMD’s Engineering/Industry Banquet on October 22, 2012. Bennett was selected for the award by Dr. James P. Riehl, Dean of UMD’s SCSE. The award is in recognition of outstanding contributions that bring excellence and distinction to UMD’s engineering programs.

“Bill has been so helpful in our efforts to bring Civil Engineering to UMD.  He has been a consistent supporter of our engineering scholarship program, and I especially appreciate the contributions he makes on the college and department advisory boards.  His perspective on the skills that graduating engineers should bring to the workplace has been very important in our program development,” noted Dean Riehl.

Bennett has helped to review the engineering curriculums for both the undergraduate and master’s programs at UMD through his involvement on both the UMD SCSE External Advisory Board and the SCSE’s Civil Engineering Department Industrial Advisory Board. The primary function of the SCSE External Advisory Board is to review if the content of UMD’s programs is compatible with the current and potential needs and practices within the industry so students are prepared to enter the work force, or continue their professional education. He has also served as Chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for UMD’s Civil Engineering Department since 2008. The Industrial Advisory Board has helped provide guidance to UMD in its efforts to receive accreditation for their Civil Engineering program. Bennett has also supported LHB donating to the department’s Engineering Scholarship program for 15 years, providing student internships, and having staff teach courses for the Civil Engineering Department.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Effort aims to help Minnesota cities get..., November 13, 2012

Effort aims to help Minnesota cities get greener

November 13, 2012

Study puts numbers to cities’ green strategies

From adopting environmentally friendly building standards to changing the way they charge residents for water consumption, cities throughout Minnesota are trying to establish their credentials as “green” cities.

But just how successful have those strategies been and what can cities learn from the experiences of their peers?A new study from the Urban Land Institute of Minnesota and the Regional Council of Mayors addresses those questions and aims to help cities take specific actions to become better stewards of natural resources.

The study, known as the “Regional Indicators Initiative,” examines energy and water usage, vehicle miles traveled, and municipal solid waste generated in 18 cities over four years.

The initiative has been in the works for a couple of years and is just getting to the point where the information is presentable, according to Rick Carter, project manager for the initiative and a senior vice president in the Minneapolis office of LHB architects and engineers.

It covers central cities like Minneapolis, St. Paul, Duluth and Rochester, as well as inner- and outer-ring suburbs from Richfield to Woodbury.

One of the goals is to measure the impact of the Minnesota GreenStep Cities program, which offers 28 “best practices” for cities to become more sustainable.

Drawing on information from utilities, cities and other sources, the initiative is believed to be the “biggest project of its kind anywhere” and the only regional study that includes water usage, according to Carter.

The project was funded with about $100,000 in grants from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Minnesota Department of Commerce’s energy division. The participating cities contributed $2,500 each.

Among the findings so far, total energy consumption among the 18 participating cities was on a downward trend from 2008 to 2010, but then it bumped up again from 2010 to 2011.

The data suggests that the reduction from 2008 to 2010 may have been “a temporary dip” because of the slow economy, Carter said.

Another finding: residential water consumption varied greatly, from about 40 gallons per person per day to 120 gallons. Armed with that data, cities on the high end can see how their peers on the low end achieved better results, according to Carter.

One of the participating cities was Falcon Heights, which made some changes a couple of years ago to promote water conservation. Specifically, the city changed its billing system from a flat rate to a variable rate that rewards conservation.

People discovered that if you “turn the faucet off a bit earlier, you won’t have to pay as much,” said Peter Lindstrom, the city’s mayor and assistant director of the Center for Science Technology & Public Policy at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

The result: Water usage among residential customers in Falcon Heights dropped 11 percent from 2010 to 2011, Lindstrom said, although commercial water usage stayed about the same.

In other green initiatives, the city recently opened a bike/pedestrian trail — a joint project with the city of Roseville and the University of Minnesota — and it’s just now finishing a solar array on the Falcon Heights city hall.

The impact of those projects is unclear; Lindstrom expects the solar array to save the city money in the long run.

Lindstrom said the regional indicators initiative will allow cities to look at which “best practices” worked and which ones “have not been able to move the dial as much as we had hoped.”

Being able to compare results with other cities is “going to be the linchpin of this whole thing,” he added.

There have been some hiccups along the way. For example, solid waste data is measured on a countywide level and isn’t broken down by city, making it tricky to come up with a precise number for individual municipalities.

Cities are good testing grounds for measuring sustainability outcomes, because they have jurisdiction over zoning, planning, land use policies and codes that have a lot to say about energy consumption and vehicle miles traveled, Carter said.

The current study includes data from 2008 to 2011. One of the next goals is to seek additional funding to expand into 2012 data, and to develop a website to allow cities and residents to explore the information.

Carter and Lindstrom spoke about the initiative at last week’s American Institute of Architects Minnesota convention in Minneapolis.

Posted: 3:46 pm Mon, November 12, 2012
By  BRIAN JOHNSON

+  Northgate Woods receives MADACS Award, November 13, 2012

Northgate Woods receives MADACS Award

November 13, 2012

TCHDC completed the substantial renovation of Northgate Woods, a 75 unit affordable property in Blaine, MN, in November 2011.  Northgate Woods was nominated for an MHA MADACS (Multi housing Achievement in Design, Advertising and Community Support) Award in the area of Complete/Total Building Renovation.

The Minnesota Multi Housing Association acknowledges the MADACS awards as the most honored award given in recognition of superior contributions to the multi housing industry.

The judging for a MADACS award is rigorous and, for the category of Complete/Total Building Renovation, includes an evaluation of cost effectiveness/return on investment, impact on property/neighborhood, impact on financial performance of property and quality of upgrade.

We are excited to have our Northgate Woods project  recognized with such a prestigious award and are grateful to everyone who played a role in the redevelopment including LHB Architects, Watson Forsberg Co. the general contractor, Real Estate Equities our Property Management Agent and of course all of the residents who worked with us and lived through twelve months of construction on the site. \

Northgate Woods will serve Blaine and the surrounding area as a high quality affordable housing development for many years to come.

Posted in the Twin Cities Housing Development Corporation Fall 2012 Newsletter

+  Plugload and Minnesota Sustainable Build..., November 13, 2012

Plugload and Minnesota Sustainable Building 2030

November 13, 2012

We are pleased to feature another guest post by Rick Carter, Senior Vice President in LHB’s Minneapolis office and LEED Fellow. He works extensively on issues of sustainable design by promoting improved indoor air quality, energy efficiency, and resource efficiency. He helped develop the Hennepin County/Minnesota Sustainable Design Guidelines and currently manages the Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond (B3) Project. Rick was a member of the Minnesota Climate Change Advisory Group and a co-chair for the Minneapolis-St. Paul Mayor’s Green Manufacturing Initiative.

Designers, energy modelers, contractors, building owners, operators, and occupants today are all focused on the energy consumption of buildings. Aggressive measures are in place to reduce loads from lighting, HVAC, and plumbing uses. But there is little awareness of building “plugloads”, and few strategies address this large and ever increasing percentage of energy consumption. There are a variety of interpretations of exactly what plugload is. In this discussion, we will define it as:

All energy consumed on site, attributed to a building, that is not related to central heating, central cooling, ventilating, plumbing (including hot water), and lighting.  All other loads, including equipment, anything that is literally plugged in (including space heaters, unit air conditioners, and lamps), process, mechanized transportation (elevators and escalators), or other miscellaneous loads, whether electric or nonelectric, is included.

To read the full blog click on this link.

Posted by Lester Shen, Director of Innovative Technologies, Center for Energy and Environment (CEE)
Date November 13, 2012

+  WCROC Donor and Volunteer Appreciation E..., November 8, 2012

WCROC Donor and Volunteer Appreciation Event

November 8, 2012

The annual Donor and Volunteer Recognition Dinner was held on September 5th in the Horticulture Display Garden. This dinner and program honors the garden donor and volunteers of the past year.

A delicious meal was prepared by Stacey Gerdes of The Hachery Bar and Grill from Lowry. The menu featured pork tenderloin with garden potatoes and green beans, followed by a warm brownie dessert and ice cream. Lee Johnston, Director of Operations, welcomed everyone to the event, and Steve Poppe hosted the evening.

Guest Speaker was Jason Aune, a Landscape Architect with LHB, presented an updated Master Plan. Jason was also the Landscape Architect who drafted the initial Master Plan which has been completed. “In going through the Master Plan process, I get to dream and design and draw up all the pretty pictures, and sometimes you wonder ‘Is this really going to be implemented? Are they really going to have the money to do this?” said Aune. “Out of all the master plan processes I’ve worked on, this one has had the most implemented…this plan wasn’t just a pretty picture. It didn’t just sit on the shelf.”

Jason proceeded to share the various new elements of the plan, which feature outdoor garden rooms, a pedestrian tunnel under Hwy 329 from the West Central Research and Outreach Center, enhancements to the Children’s Garden, and the “heart” of the plan is a Pavilion complete with indoor restrooms and kitchen facilities.

The family of Myron and Doris Benson, Bill and Phyllis Rickmeyer, Lloyd and Diane Fehr, and Riverview Farms were all recognized at the event for their contributions to the Garden in the past year.

Landscape Architect, Jason Aune, with the updated Garden Master Plan

 

+  AIA Minnesota’s 2012 Convention runs t..., November 8, 2012

AIA Minnesota’s 2012 Convention runs through Friday

November 8, 2012

 

They are well aware of historic structure tax credits and energy efficiency tax credits.

But architecture firms are often missing out when it comes to federal and state research and development tax credits, a tax expert for the industry said Tuesday at AIA Minnesota’s annual convention in Minneapolis.

Michael D’Onofrio of West Palm Beach, Fla.-based Engineered Tax Services said people think of a man or a woman in a white lab coat when they think of research and development.

“Most people don’t realize how many other situations that R&D works for,” D’Onofrio said at a morning seminar.

That includes the research that architecture and engineering firms often conduct, from experimenting with optimal building materials to developing better energy efficiency or wastewater technologies for a structure.

Research activities that a client already paid for are excluded from the Federal Research & Experimentation Tax Credit, but D’Onofrio was confident that everyone in the gathering had qualifying activities and expenses. Research is conducted for bids that an architecture company does not win, for example.

If an employee spends more than 80 percent of his or her time on the work, all of his or her annual salary can qualify toward the credit calculations. Same goes for 65 percent to 75 percent of payments to third-party contractors, including academic researchers and nonprofits, conducting the work.

“Most construction and architecture firms don’t even realize it’s available to them,” D’Onofrio said of the research tax credit.

Better yet, the credit is retroactive.

“You can go back — 10 years or more — on projects that have been placed in service,” D’Onofrio said.

The federal credit expired on Dec. 31, 2011. But D’Onofrio thinks it likely that Congress will retroactively extend the credit through 2012 and allow it in future years.

Under a more complicated traditional method, 20 percent of expenses qualify for the credit above a calculated base amount. A simpler Alternative Simple Credit allows 14 percent of expenses to qualify above a base amount.

Under a 2010 jobs bill signed by former Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Minnesota has an especially generous state R&D tax credit: a refundable credit that applies to 10 percent of the first $2 million of qualifying expense, then 2.5 percent for expenses above $2 million.

R&D tax credits can turn up tens of thousands of dollars, and sometimes more than $1 million, for an architecture company. But D’Onofrio also cautioned that it takes a great deal of documentation, comparing it to the processes of achieving Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification.

“There’s a very detailed process you need to go through, except in this case it is the IRS going over your methodology,” D’Onofrio said.

Companies need to decide whether the potential credit from past years is high enough to hazard a potential tax audit. D’Onofrio advised that applying for the credit is not worth it unless consulting companies such as his are promising at a least a “more likely than not” chance of 50 percent or higher that the IRS will accept the credit.

D’Onofrio thought R&D tax credits can be even more useful when they are packaged with other building innovation-related tax incentives such as federal Energy Policy Act 179D tax deductions.

“It’s powerful what’s available out there,” D’Onofrio said.

Rick Carter, commercial focus leader for LHB architects and engineers in Minneapolis, said after D’Onofrio’s talk that his company has been seeking energy-efficiency-related tax credits, but it was only recently that LHB started evaluating research-related tax credits.

Carter’s biggest advice for an architecture firm that is interested is to seek professional help from a consultant.

“I wouldn’t want to do it without a consultant. … It’s like building a building, you have an owner and a contractor and a designer. In this case, there’s us, the CPA and the consultant. These guys know it inside and out,” Carter said.

The AIA Minnesota’s 2012 convention runs through Friday in the Minneapolis Convention Center. (Photo: Joey McLeister)

Read More: http://finance-commerce.com/2012/11/expert-architects-may-overlook-rd-tax-credits/

+  North Lake Calhoun and South Lake of the..., October 10, 2012

North Lake Calhoun and South Lake of the Isles Visioning Charrette

October 10, 2012

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) hired LHB, Inc. to explore design directions for an area between Lake Calhoun and Lake of the Isles.

The study area includes a disjointed collection of Park Board parcels between the lakes and along Lake Street and the Midtown Greenway. Increasing use has caused congestion and safety concerns, with amenities like Tin Fish brining even more visitors. A recent count showed more than 1.3 million pedestrians use this area annually, making it the most visited park in the metro area.

Possible directions for change will be explored following a public visioning session held on Wednesday, October 10th. An Open House will be held on Saturday, October, 13thfrom 9-11:30 am at The MoZaic for the public to review and offer input.

The work will be largely accomplished during a four-day work session. The process highlights LHB’s ability to work with our clients to engage the public and project stakeholders and then respond quickly with compelling and appropriate design directions.

+  Minnesota Waste Wise 2012 Annual Meeting, October 2, 2012

Minnesota Waste Wise 2012 Annual Meeting

October 2, 2012

 

Making the Connection: 
Business Sustainability Practices and the Global Environment

Keynote Speaker: Will Steger
Polar explorer and sustainability champion Will Steger joins us for “Making the Connection: Business Sustainability Practices and the Global Environment.” Steger is a fascinating presenter who will share research and insights into how a global perspective can energize environmental initiatives at home. Mr. Steger will also announce his newest business venture: an off-the-grid conference and sustainability education center in Northern Minnesota. We’ll also have an engaging panel of speakers and plenty of great opportunities to network with peers in the sustainable business community.

Agenda:
11:00 a.m. Registration & Networking

 

11:45 a.m. Lunch12:00 – 12:10 p.m. Welcome & Opening Remarks
John Crudo, MWW Board Chair, President—Green Lights Recycling
Bill Blazar, Minnesota Chamber Senior Vice President, Public Affairs & Business Development

12:10 – 12:20 p.m. Minnesota Waste Wise Annual Report
Jill Curran, MWW Acting Executive Director

12:20 – 12:30 p.m. It’s In The Bag program and Member Showcase
Kevin Donovan, Store Director – Festival Foods
Crystal Saric, Waste Services & Reduction – Fairview Health Systems

12:30 – 12:40 pm. Networking break

12:40 – 1:15 p.m. Keynote Speaker – Will Steger
Polar explorer and business owner Will Steger shares his research and insights into how a global perspective can energize environmental initiatives at home. He will make the first public announcement about his newest business venture.

1:15 – 1:30 p.m. Breaking the Mold – Sustainability Success Stories
Linda Fisher, Director Marketing Communications – MOM Brands
Rick Carter, Senior Vice President, LHB Corporation

 

1:30 – 1:50 p.m. “Making the Connection” Panel Discussion
Panel moderated by: Laura Boyd, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce
Panelists: Will Steger; Katy Gillispie, Environmental Manager, Corporate Engineering – MOM Brands; Kevin Donovan, Store Director – Festival Foods; and Rick Carter, Senior Vice President, LHB Corporation

1:55 – 2:00 p.m. Minnesota Waste Wise Awards Presentation
John Crudo, MWW Board Chair, President—Green Lights Recycling

2:00 p.m. Final Remarks & Adjourn
John Crudo, MWW Board Chair, President—Green Lights Recycling

+  LHB Staff News, September 28, 2012

LHB Staff News

September 28, 2012

Duluth, MN (September 28, 2012) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Frank Borich, joins our Industrial Focus as a Civil Designer. Borich is a recent graduate from the University of Minnesota, Duluth with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering.

Janet Windus, is an Administrative Assistant in our Public Works/Structures Focus. Windus has more than 24 years of administrative assistance experience within the design and construction industry.

Jackie Sorvari, is a Financial Accountant. Sorvari brings over six years of experience as a financial accountant.

Steven Sandman, joins our Pipeline Focus as a Mechanical Project Manager. Sandman has over 20 years of experience overseeing the design of cross country liquid and gas pipelines.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Sustainable Design in Minnesota, September 26, 2012

Sustainable Design in Minnesota

September 26, 2012

A recent announcement from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) reports that the total footprint of LEED-certified commercial buildings throughout the world has exceeded two billion square feet. We are pleased to feature Rick Carter as a guest blogger to tell us about his experience in sustainable design in Minnesota. Rick is the Senior Vice President in LHB’s Minneapolis office and is a LEED Fellow. He works extensively on issues of sustainable design by promoting improved indoor air quality, energy efficiency, and resource efficiency. He helped develop the Hennepin County/Minnesota Sustainable Design Guidelines and currently manages the Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond (B3) Project. Rick was a member of the Minnesota Climate Change Advisory Group and a co-chair for the Minneapolis-St. Paul Mayor’s Green Manufacturing Initiative.

To read the full blog click on this link .

Posted by Lester Shen, Director of Innovative Technologies, Center for Energy and Environment (CEE)
Date August 24, 2012

+  MN Rolling Twins Have a New Field, September 12, 2012

MN Rolling Twins Have a New Field

September 12, 2012

The Rolling Twins have a new asphalt paved softball field, thanks in part to a $200,000 Pepsi Refresh Grant applied for by the MN Twins. The Twins and Hennepin County also added funding to make the project possible. The Twins were competing against 15 other Major League Baseball teams for the grant. Their idea was to create a specialty softball field for the Courage Center’s Rolling Twins softball wheelchair team. They were playing in a parking lot shared with vehicles and were in need of a dedicated facility.

To read more follow this link to the Minnesota Asphalt Pavement Association Newletter, July 2012 Edition

+  Marcelle Weslock joins LHB’s Civil..., September 11, 2012

Marcelle Weslock joins LHB’s Civil Engineering Group

September 11, 2012

LHB is pleased to announce the addition of Marcelle J. Weslock, PE, LEED AP, Civil Engineering Group Leader, to our Minneapolis office.

Weslock has over 15 years of engineering experience as department manager, project manager, and project engineer for a wide range of project types for local and national clients in both the private and public arenas. Weslock’s specialty includes site engineering and storm water management. In 2011 Weslock was bestowed Building Design + Construction (BD+C) Magazine’s “40 under 40” Award.

Prior to LHB, Weslock served as Director of Civil Engineering for six years at a large national architectural/engineering firm. She developed and maintained technical design standards, provided oversight of design, managed staffing, and mentored other engineers. Weslock also served as Project Manager in the firm’s Federal Programs market sector leading a multi-discipline team, developing the project execution strategy, controlling budgets and schedules, working with consultants, and serving as the central point of communication between the client and the team.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Mike Fischer at 612.752.6920, Mike.Fischer@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Duluth’s new Lincoln Park Middle S..., September 7, 2012

Duluth’s new Lincoln Park Middle School gets good grades on first glance

September 7, 2012

If traffic is a good indicator, western Duluth families were ready to see their new school. Cars packed the two parking lots at Lincoln Park Middle School and spilled over onto several neighboring streets Thursday for an open house and hot dog grill-out.

Cars packed the two parking lots at Lincoln Park Middle School and spilled over onto several neighboring streets Thursday night for an open house and hot dog grill-out. The sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders and their families could check their schedules and see their new $50 million digs for the first time before school starts Monday. The renovated Ordean East — housed in the former East High School — also had an open house.

First impressions for many students were about the size of the school, which can hold 1,100 students and sits high on 76 acres in Duluth’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. The school, at 3215 W. Third St., is reached via a new winding road.

It might take some getting used to, but “it’s huge and it smells better,” said eighth-grader Kaylee Erickson, comparing Lincoln Park to Morgan Park Middle School. Morgan Park, built in 1916, was a K-12 school, then a junior and senior high and then a middle school. It also saw additions in 1938 and 1964. It closed in June.

The views of the St. Louis River, Duluth harbor and ore docks seen everywhere from the cafeteria and commons area to classrooms and the media center were another favorite. “I like the view. I really like the view,” said eighth-grader Hannah Moeller, who was concerned that students treat the new school well. “I hope they don’t destroy it.”

Parents were impressed with the newness and Duluth’s scenery, but also with the school’s new security features. The main entrance passes through the office and all other doors will be locked throughout the day.

“That’s definitely a plus,” said Barb Wagner, mom to a seventh-grader, who is also happy that the school is closer to home than Morgan Park Middle School.

Eighth-grader Mason McCumber noted the size of both the pool and the gym. Because of that, he was “kind of” excited for school, he said.

“He said he wishes he was in sixth grade again so he could stay here longer because he really liked it,” said his mom, Jodi McCumber, who noted that she liked the temperature controls. “Usually for open house we’re roasting in the classrooms.”

Sixth-grader Marissa Steltz didn’t attend Morgan Park, but she liked the new school. But her elder sister, Caylee Steltz, a Denfeld senior, preferred the older school.

“This is too up-to-date,” she said. “It seems like college.”

Teachers, chatting with families and students in their new classrooms Thursday night, seemed ready to be in the new school.

“I feel very honored to have the opportunity to teach in this building,” said Read 180 teacher Maureen Breemeersch. “I don’t think my feet have touched the floor just yet.”

Studies show academics improve in new buildings, said orchestra teacher Clair Chopp, noting she now has windows in her room.

“Could we have survived at Morgan Park? Yes. But 21st-century technology, upgrades, the flow of students; it’s been well-designed,” she said. “I really hope the community comes and sees the building, and between all of the new construction, sees what their money has bought because the Red Plan was so controversial. But this was so necessary for the viability of this district.”

The parking lots can hold about 300 cars, and probably will never have such overflow as they did Thursday night, said Kerry Leider, property and risk manager for the district. The auditorium can hold 400 people, and for any other large events like Thursday’s, the district would make use of shuttles to take the pressure off surrounding neighborhoods.

+  With new pools, hope floats for Duluth E..., August 27, 2012

With new pools, hope floats for Duluth East, Denfeld swim teams

August 27, 2012

Linda Puglisi came up with a novel idea of how to determine who would be the first of her Duluth Denfeld girls swimmers to dive into the new pool at Lincoln Park Middle School.

“All my girls wanted to be the first ones in the pool because the pool had never been used,” Puglisi said at practice last week. “I had all of them line up on the side of the pool and I counted, ‘1-2-3, jump!’ and they all jumped in at the same time.”

Puglisi immortalized the moment with a photograph that she enlarged and framed and that now rests along the pool deck at the state-of-the-art facility.

“Nobody wanted to get out (of the water) once we got in,” senior captain Taylor Boelk said.

Likewise, the eastern part of town has a new pool, all part of the Duluth School District’s long-term facilities plan. That pool, housed at the renovated Ordean East Middle School (old East High School), opened for Duluth East swimmers and divers earlier this month.

Until now, East divers needed to train across town at Morgan Park Middle School because Woodland Middle School didn’t have a diving board. Woodland, a four-lane pool that is half the size of the new eight-lane pools, caused enough headaches of its own with its cramped feel and stuffy atmosphere.

“This is so much better than Woodland,” East senior Emily Youngstrand said.

The western middle school seats approximately 500, while around 320 can fit in the balcony at Ordean East — far more than Morgan Park holds. Both pools have electronic timing and electronic diving scoreboards, provide fabulous scenic views and have family locker rooms that allow for more privacy and accessibility to the community.

Kerry Leider, the district’s property and risk manager, was on hand when the facilities opened up.

“It was fun to hear the ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ as students and athletes came into the facility and saw it at the same time,” he said. “The pools provide a venue that Duluth has never had before.”

Among the benefits is increased numbers on the swim teams: East’s roster climbed from 58 to 65 athletes and Denfeld’s nearly doubled from 22 to 38.

“I have so many new swimmers who are excited because of the new pool; it’s boosted their morale,” Puglisi said.

In addition, the size of the pools and their increased seating capacity allow both schools to bid to host section meets. East coach Lindsay Byrka said her school expects to host the Section 7AA meet every three years, starting in 2013; Puglisi expects Lincoln Park to host the 5A meet in 2014.

The facilities also could lead to better performances at section and state meets down the road. East only qualified two swimmers in last year’s Class AA meet, but Byrka believes that number will go up in the future.

“Now with the pool, we have more space for the girls to train and so many more chances to make it to state and compete with those teams that have eight-lane pools and swim year-round,” she said.

Sophomore Kelly Punyko (100 backstroke) is the lone state qualifier to return for the Greyhounds, while Cora Knauss and Alissa Marlow placed high in the section meet. Youngstrand, a four-year letterwinner, specializes in the backstroke and sprint freestyle events.

Denfeld lost three swimmers to graduation, but returns senior co-captains Taylor Boelk (breaststroke, relays) and Trudy Quain and junior co-captains Hanna West (freestyle) and Kelcy Huston (diving).

A youthful Cloquet-Esko-Carlton team (four seniors) and Proctor-Hermantown also compete in Section 5A. Section 7A is highlighted by Grand Rapids junior Solveig Viren, who finished second in the 100 freestyle and third in the 50 free at the 2011 Class A meet after a pair of fourth-place finishes as a freshman. At sections, the Thunderhawks edged Hibbing, which returns two-event champion Lilly Dougherty (200 and 500 freestyles).

By: Rick Weegman, Duluth News Tribune

Published August 27, 2012, 12:00 AM

+  LHB Employees Create Interior Design Tex..., August 8, 2012

LHB Employees Create Interior Design Textbook

August 8, 2012

Duluth/Minneapolis, Minn. (August 8, 2012) – Daniel Stine, LHB’s CAD Administrator, and Aaron Hansen, Certified Interior Designer at LHB, authored the recently published textbook, Interior Design Using Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013. Available through Amazon.com, the book helps readers learn Revit Architecture while developing the interior of a two-story law office. The reader is provided an architectural model with established columns, beams, exterior walls, minimal interior walls, and roofs in which to work. This allows more emphasis to be placed on interior design, rather than primary architectural elements. The chapter’s chronology generally follows the typical design process. Readers learn to accurately and efficiently develop their design ideas and skills.

Stine has 20 years of design experience and is a registered architect in Wisconsin. He trains LHB’s staff in Computer Aided Drafting and Building Information Modeling (CAD/BIM). Stine also teaches these topics as an adjunct instructor at Lake Superior College. Stine has written several textbooks which are used in high schools and colleges across the United States.

Hansen has 15 years of certified interior design experience and works mainly with LHB’s Education Focus.  Hansen works with user groups to review programming needs and create space plans; review, select, specify, and coordinate new furniture while incorporating existing furniture; and select finishes to create dynamic environments.

+  LHB Staff News, August 3, 2012

LHB Staff News

August 3, 2012

Duluth, MN (August 3, 2012) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth office:

Caralyn Stevens, is a Designer working in LHB’s Healthcare Focus. Stevens graduated this May with honors from North Dakota State University with a Master of Architecture.

Krista Pascoe, joined as a Senior Marketing Coordinator. Pascoe has more than eight years of experience in the specialty construction industry and brings expertise in graphic design, industry writing, and corporate branding.

Collin Osenroth, joined as a Structural Designer to assist LHB’s Industrial Focus. Osenroth has over five years of civil and structural engineering experience.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Courage Center to Debut New Wheelchair S..., July 23, 2012

Courage Center to Debut New Wheelchair Softball Field

July 23, 2012

 

The mission has been accomplished! Back in August 2010, Courage Center, with help from the Minnesota Twins, won the $200,000 Pepsi Refresh Grant, beating out 14  other Major League Baseball teams. Courage Center subsequently used that grant to build a wheelchair-accessible softball field for their teams. Previously, the Junior and Adult Rolling Twins played in a Brooklyn Center church parking lot, and they were in desperate need for their very own accessible field. That dream will officially come true in a few weeks.

After Courage Center agreed on a location for the softball field, they held several meetings to decide on the features of the park. Construction of the ball field started in April with the final touches happening next week when workers install a scoreboard and paint the lines.

Todd Anderson Field, which is Minnesota’s first fully wheelchair-accessible softball field, is located in Northwoods Park in Brooklyn Park. The asphalt field is color-coated (like sport turf), has fences, foul poles, accessible dugouts, and a scoreboard. Also, the field has a moveable fence along with a permanent outfield fence so it can be configured for different events. Courage Center plans to erect bleachers at Todd Anderson Field next year when they raise more funds. There is one field at the complex.

Todd Anderson Field will be a multi-purpose facility. The metropolitan area has four wheelchair softball teams. Both Courage Center teams will be practicing at the field, while hosting tournaments occasionally. The Todd Anderson Field won’t be just for softball. The field will also be able to host different events and activities, like a Bike “Rodeo” and Power Soccer (yeah!). Sharon Van Winkel, Director of Sports and Recreation at Courage, thinks that the “new field might lead to more teams.”

Next month, Courage Center and the Twins will host a grand opening to officially open the field. But, before the opening, Courage will host two wheelchair softball tournaments at the new field, including an adult tournament next weekend, with about five teams participating. On August 3 and 4, the new field will host the Junior National Wheelchair Softball Tournament. The grand opening will take place on August 9 from 5:30pm-7:30pm at the field (7600 107th Avenue, Brooklyn Park) and will feature speakers, Twins personnel, popcorn, and a ribbon cutting. Courage is reportedly trying to bring a couple of Twins players. Also on the agenda is a Home Run Derby with T.C. Bear and a wheelchair softball demonstration. It should be a great event to start a new chapter in Courage’s Sports and Recreation Department.

Aside from the $200,000 Pepsi grant, Courage received help from the Twins, Ottobock, Hennepin County Youth Sports, and McGough Construction. It took years to make this field a reality, and Courage Center is really excited to open this field for different types of sports and activities for years to come. Thanks to former Twin Michael Cuddyer for being Courage Center’s spokesman in getting out the vote! More information and pictures to come!

Written by Michael Sack
Posted by Sam Graves on July 21, 2012

+  Energy savings on the way, July 19, 2012

Energy savings on the way

July 19, 2012

As the world attempts to conserve energy and the cost for that energy, the Chisago Lakes School District is ahead of the curve in the effort to go green. Director of Buildings and Grounds Tim Burton along with a representative from LHB, an engineering and architecture firm, attended last week’s Chisago Lakes School Board meeting. They went over some things they found to save money in the district buildings. Burton and LHB, along with the Center for Energy and Environment, found that at the high school, middle school and Taylors Falls Elementary, they could reduce the HVAC equipment run time and optimize equipment controls, the duct static pressure control and seal the building better in certain spots to prevent air leakage. At the Primary School, they just need to seal. The cost for implementation and verification of all the jobs is just over $169,000, but the annual savings on energy costs will be $25,972, making the project “pay for itself” in six and a half years. Burton said that they are trying to save energy in the buildings without installing new equipment. “We just want to run more efficiently with what we have,” he said.

Burton said he’d like to have the projects finished by the end of the summer, but if they can’t, they’ll work at night during the school year. The board announced the hiring of a new Director of Curriculum. Sarah Schmidt, a teacher from St. Croix Falls, WI, will be filling the position. Schmidt did an internship in curriculum direction and principal at Unity High School in Balsam Lake, WI. The board also called for the election of board members in the upcoming elections. The filing date for candidates will be between July 31-Aug. 13. Three seats, Jerry Vitalis, Lori Berg and Noel Stensrud, will be up for election on Tuesday, Nov. 6. Stensrud has notified the Press she does not plan on seeking re-election

• Orientation 9th grade and High School Open House Aug. 28. • Middle School invites you to Open House Aug. 27. • Taylors Falls Open House is Aug. 29.
By Jeff Norton, Chisago County Press
7/19/2012 9:25:00 AM

+  Teams Inspect Flood-Damaged Northland Br..., July 18, 2012

Teams Inspect Flood-Damaged Northland Bridges

July 18, 2012

 

Duluth, MN (Northland’s NewsCenter) – The inspection teams, like LHB Engineering, have been hired by both the City of Duluth and the Minnesota Department of Transportation to inspect 180 local bridges that are considered in need of further inspection following June’s flood.

Previous bridge reports done by the city are giving the teams a clearer picture of any changes that have occurred to the bridges’ infrastructures since the floods.

According to Lisa Marynik, of LHB, the number one priority of the inspections is to ensure that the bridges are currently safe for travel.

“From what we’ve found so far, yes—they’re all safe. What has to be closed has already been closed. And now, we’re here doing just a little more detailed inspection of these bridges,” said Marynik.

At the end of this week each team will compile a damage assessment, which will include a cost estimate for repairs.

Those figures will then be used to apply for either FEMA aid, or Federal highway funding.

Link to video interview with Lisa Marynik.

By KBJR News 1 – NorthlandsNewsCenter.com
July 18, 2012 at 7:20 PM CDT

+  LHB’s Northwestern High School Design ..., July 16, 2012

LHB’s Northwestern High School Design Wins Awards

July 16, 2012

Duluth, Minn. (July 16, 2012) – LHB’s design of Northwestern High School’s addition and remodeling project for the School District of Maple, Wis. received regional and society-wide awards from the American Society of Heating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (AHSRAE) due to its energy efficiency, indoor air quality, innovation, low operation and maintenance, cost effectiveness, and minimal environmental impact. The project removed the oldest portions of the building, which were constructed in 1937, repurposing newer parts of the building and constructing two- and three- story additions. Environmentally-friendly features include in-floor heating, high-performance windows, and energy recovery ventilation. In addition to providing design services, LHB assisted in securing a $33 million referendum to provide renovations to a total of three schools within the district.

LHB mechanical engineers, Ryan Thorson and David Williams, wrote the May 2012 ASHRAE Journal article detailing the design challenges. LHB also received a second place ASHRAE regional award for the Essentia bi-plane relocation project. ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality and sustainability within the industry.

+  ‘Unprecedented’ Effort to In..., July 11, 2012

‘Unprecedented’ Effort to Inspect 180 Northland Bridges After Flood

July 11, 2012

During the next two weeks, six teams of bridge engineers will inspect at least 180 bridges across northern Minnesota after devastating floods tore through 13 counties last month, leaving at least $100 million dollars in damage and raising questions about the safety of some bridge spans across the Northland.

“We’re not exactly sure how much damage we’re going to find,” acknowledged Beth Petrowske, spokesperson for the Minnesota Department of Transportation in northern Minnesota.

On Tuesday, 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS accompanied a two-person inspection team, one of six led by consultants SEH Inc., a St. Paul-based engineering and architectural firm with an office in Duluth that MnDOT has hired in a contract worth up to $500,000.

MnDOT did not have enough bridge inspectors on its own to visit so many bridges in such a short time, Petrowske said, and turned to outside consultants for help.

As bridge engineer Joe Litman with LHB Corp. surveyed some of the damage over a culvert in Duluth’s Keene creek, he pointed to a section under the bridge that seemed suspended in mid-air and remarked, “There’s literally nothing holding this section up.”

“It’s a floating road,” Litman said.

Click on the link to watch our story above to go along on the inspections and learn more about what they’re looking for.

 Created: 07/10/2012 7:01 PM KSTP.com | By: Mark Albert

+  LHB Staff News, July 10, 2012

LHB Staff News

July 10, 2012

Duluth, MN (July 10, 2012) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

William Nichols, joins our Duluth Office as an Electrical Engineer. Nichols has eight years of experience and is a licensed electrical engineer in California, Colorado, and Indiana with Minnesota licensure pending.

Deborah Katzmark, joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician and will be working with the pipeline group. Katzmark is a graduate of WITC Superior with a degree in Mechanical and Computer Drafting (AutoCadd).

Susan Gibson, joins our Duluth Office as a Human Resource Generalist. Gibson is a recent graduate from the University of Minnesota – Duluth majoring in Human Resources with a minor in Organizational Management.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Top Projects: Greenleaf Apartments and S..., July 10, 2012

Top Projects: Greenleaf Apartments and SpringHouse Ministry Center

July 10, 2012

 

Considering the amount of unity and cohesion needed to bring Greenleaf Apartments and SpringHouse Ministry Center together, it seems fitting that the project was named after John Greenleaf Whittier, a Quaker poet dedicated to social reform.

“Definitely, we saw good synergy among everyone involved,” said Kim Bretheim, architect and housing focus leader at LHB Inc., the architecture firm for the development.

The Ministry Center brings together three congregations: Salem English Lutheran Church, Lyndale Congregational United Church of Christ, and First Christian Church of Minneapolis.

The Salem English Lutheran Church, in particular, found itself challenged by a collapsing structure, but church leaders didn’t want to abandon the historical feel of the building. That led LHB to use original elements such as ceiling lights, a pipe organ and stained glass windows as a nod toward church history, while significantly expanding its resources like offices, classrooms, and kitchen space.

Three sanctuaries provide distinctive environments. For example, a nearly windowless and smaller sanctuary gives visitors a feeling of meditation while the largest sanctuary features expansive space that offers a sense of larger community.

The trio of churches decided to share one building to sell a portion of the site to Brighton Development, which created funding for the church redevelopment and enabled construction of a mixed-used development with affordable and market-rate housing.

LHB used original elements in the church such as ceiling lights, a pipe organ and stained glass windows as a nod toward church history, while significantly expanding its resources like offices, classrooms and kitchen space. (Submitted photos)

That project, Greenleaf Apartments, features 66 apartments in three stories, with commercial spaces on the ground level. Residents have access to an underground parking garage, with additional off-street spots available in the surrounding neighborhood and on Lyndale Avenue.

While the two developments might seem very different in terms of audience and residents, the projects were able to present a cohesive aesthetic on the high-profile corner. The combination of stone and brick helps the development blend in with the area’s historical feel, while the use of metal accents offers a quick, modern touch.

The project tapped into a number of sustainable strategies, Bretheim noted. In addition to high-efficiency heating and cooling, the development features enhanced installation, low-maintenance exterior materials, below-grade storm water storage system, and porous pavers. Also, architects focused on making the buildings pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly, especially given the development’s proximity to the popular Midtown Greenway bike route.

“All of these elements really helped with making efficient use of the site,” said Bretheim. “This is a prime corner that had been underutilized, so we wanted to make it unique and approachable.”

Greenleaf Apartments offers 66 affordable and market-rate apartments in three stories, with commercial spaces on the ground level. (Submitted photos)

Address: 2743 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis

Project cost: $11 million

Project size: 8,700 square feet of ground-floor commercial space; 66 apartment units

Owner: Brighton Development, Salem English Lutheran Church, Lyndale United Church of Christ, and First Christian Church

Contractor: Frana Construction and Watson-Forsberg

Architect: LHB Inc.

Engineers: Mattson/Macdonald/Young and LHB Inc.

Editor’s note: This is the 10th profile in a series featuring the 26 honorees in Finance & Commerce’s Top Projects of 2011. The series runs through Aug. 2. Previous installments are available here.

Posted: 1:47 pm Mon, July 9, 2012  By Elizabeth Millard, Finance & Commerce

+  Top Projects: Edina Realty, July 5, 2012

Top Projects: Edina Realty

July 5, 2012

The Ackerberg Group, owner of 4100 Minnetonka Blvd. in St. Louis Park, “got a very fresh, turn-your-head building for that site and that street,” says Bruce Cornwall, director of integrated design at LHB, the architect and engineer for the project. (Submitted photo)

The building at 4100 Minnetonka Blvd. in St. Louis Park had long been a neighborhood fixture, housing the beloved Lincoln Del years ago and Fishman’s kosher restaurant and grocery store more recently. The owner, the Ackerberg Group, wanted to keep the building as a neighborhood focal point, but the structure needed plenty of work.

Turning an adjacent parking lot into an addition, architect LHB created a new neighborhood showpiece with its handsome copper-clad building, and a new office for Edina Realty. The wedge-shaped design renovated the existing building while making better use of space on the former parking lot, all while giving the well-traveled corner new prominence.

“The owner, Stuart Ackerberg, is very interested in contributing to the urban streetscape. He wanted a modern infill building rather than creating a typical suburban office building,” says Bruce Cornwall, director of integrated design at LHB. “He got a very fresh, turn-your-head building for that site and that street. It’s like a missing tooth was filled in, and that has a big impact on a neighborhood and an urban environment.”

Having the 9,950-square-foot building serve as the star of the streetscape played well into Edina Realty’s goal of offering a strong neighborhood presence for its new office. It was consolidating two of its locations, from Olson Memorial Highway in Golden Valley and Calhoun Square in Minneapolis, where it was on an upper floor, Cornwall says. The company wanted its new office on the street level.

The $1.5 million building also makes a mark on the neighborhood with its green elements. The building features a white roof to reduce the heat island effect, as well as energy-efficient lighting, water-saving fixtures, and water-management practices to prevent run-off. The team incorporated native plantings to reduce irrigation needs, reused the building’s existing windows, and placed windows in the addition to flood it with natural light. The building’s sturdy copper exterior also gives the building a contemporary flair.

The team recycled 75 percent of the scrap metal and other waste from the project. Working on a highly compressed construction schedule, from mid-March to mid-July last year, LHB opted for structural insulated panels to hasten the process and use a more energy-efficient option. Construction stumbled a bit when the team found old wells on site and water leaking in the foundation, but they fixed the problem and repaired the damage, adding extra waterproofing, Cornwall notes.

The building should last quite some time in St. Louis Park. The team designed the space so that it can be subdivided to accommodate multiple tenants in the future, who all can enjoy working in a fresh, new space with years of history in its walls.

Click on link for a slide show of submitted exterior photos and interior shots by photographer Bill Klotz:

Address: 4100 Minnetonka Blvd., St. Louis Park

Project cost: $1.5 million

Project size: 9,950 square feet

Owner: The Ackerberg Group

Contractor: Ackerberg Construction

Architect: LHB Corp.

Engineer: LHB Corp.

Editor’s note: This is the seventh profile in a series featuring the 26 honorees in Finance & Commerce’s Top Projects of 2011. The series runs through Aug. 2. Previous installments are available here.

Posted: 11:21 am Tue, July 3, 2012 – written by Suzy Frisch, Finance & Commerce

+  Ridgewater College preparing for $14M up..., June 28, 2012

Ridgewater College preparing for $14M upgrade

June 28, 2012

 

 

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities is looking for an owner’s representative to help oversee a $14 million project that includes renovation of 70,000 square feet of space in four buildings, including this facility on the Willmar campus. (Submitted rendering: LHB Architects and Engineers)

With $13.85 million in hand from the 2012 state bonding bill, Ridgewater College is proceeding with long-anticipated plans to improve classroom, lab and student services space at its Willmar campus.

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities last week put out a request for an owner’s representative for the project, which will remodel 70,000 square feet of inefficient and tired space.

The project also includes construction of a new campus entry, demolition of an obsolete 8,500-square-foot administration building, new heating and cooling systems, and elimination of $4.5 million worth of deferred maintenance.

Brian Yolitz, associate vice chancellor for facilities at MnSCU, said the project will “right-size” space and will improve the layout to accommodate modern equipment and teaching styles.

“It’s really not a sexy project, but it’s something we need to take care of,” he said.

The Ridgewater plans were among the $132 million in MnSCU projects included in the $496.5 million state bonding bill. Including user-financed debt service, the bonding bill supports $566.8 million worth of projects across the state.

MnSCU had requested $222.5 million.

Ridgewater’s space makeover was No. 3 on MnSCU’s 2012 capital budget request priority list, behind asset preservation ($110 million) and a renovation of workforce program space at Minneapolis Community & Technical College ($13.4 million).

The Ridgewater project, which will serve the college’s popular agriculture and veterinary technology programs, has been in line for years.

MnSCU received $200,000 in design money in 2008 and sought construction money in 2010, but a line-item veto from then-Gov. Tim Pawlenty removed the project from that year’s bonding bill.

“In 2012, we were lucky enough to get it funded,” Yolitz said.

The $14 million project includes $10.1 million in hard construction costs. LHB Architects and Engineers is the designer. A contractor hasn’t been selected.

MnSCU is accepting responses to the owner’s representative solicitation through July 9 and it expects to award a contract by the end of July. The 18-month project will start in March 2013, according to Melinda Voss, MnSCU’s public relations director.

Yolitz said the owner’s representative will “work on our behalf to make sure the construction is being done in accordance with the drawings and specifications.”

The work touches four buildings that date to the 1960s and 1970s, according to Bruce Cornwall, an architect and project principal in LHB’s Minneapolis office. Some of the existing spaces will be gutted.

New academic spaces will allow for larger equipment and advanced training now required in the veterinarian-tech programs, Cornwall said, and the ventilation will be improved.

Kitchen space will be smaller because the college doesn’t do cafeteria-style meal preparation or cooking programs anymore, and student services will be more centrally located, Cornwall said.

The spaces haven’t been renovated in decades and are “very, very overdue” from both a programming and building performance standpoint, Cornwall said.

A $3 million first phase, completed in October 2010, included new and remodeled instructional space and demolition of outdated 1950s-era buildings, according to MnSCU.

Ridgewater College is a two-year school with about 3,300 full-time students at its campuses in Willmar and Hutchinson.

Finance and Commerce – posted: Wed, June 27, 2012   Written by Brian Johnson

+  Blaine youth baseball task force meets c..., June 27, 2012

Blaine youth baseball task force meets consultants

June 27, 2012

 

Four consultants who are studying the feasibility of a large youth baseball complex in Blaine met June 21 with staff from the National Sports Center (NSC).

This spring, the National Sports Center Foundation (NSCF) awarded a $60,000 contract to Minneapolis and Dallas-based Conventions, Sports & Leisure International (CSL) to complete a feasibility study addressing development of a baseball youth complex and compare that use with other field development.

CSL International is partnering with Baltimore, Md.-based Ripken Design Group, and Minneapolis-based LHB Architects to tentatively complete the youth baseball feasibility study by the end of August.

Ripken Design assists municipalities, ownership groups and investors with design, management and development of stadiums, sports and activity complexes.

The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) provided $40,000 earlier this year to fund the youth baseball feasibility study. The Minnesota Twins Baseball Club, Anoka County, the city of Blaine and NSC paid $5,000 each, said Barclay Kruse, the NSC’s chief communications officer.

According to Kruse, Weston Johnson, CSL International project manager; Tim Korby, LHB Corp. project principal; and Michael Fisher, LHB Corp. Minneapolis office leader, took an afternoon golf cart tour of the NSC and proposed youth field sites.

The trio was accompanied by Jim Arnold, Ripken Design’s director of projects.

Blaine City Manager Clark Arneson, Minnesota Amauer Sports Commission (MASC) Chairman Duane Ahrens and NSCF Board Member Al Gottschalk also attended last week’s meeting.

“The main purpose of this first-time meeting was to put faces together with names,” Kruse said.

The task force is currently exploring the concept of adding 16 youth baseball fields located on land directly north of 105th Avenue N.E. and four fields by Radisson Road.

A stadium of undetermined size would be located on soccer fields B1 and B2. Plans show nine new soccer fields marked N1-N4, O1-O4 and P1 would be placed to the north near 109th Avenue N.E. as well as a new parking lot (Lot F).

Placement of four additional youth ball fields has been suggested across Radisson Road to the east of the Victory Links golf course.

The youth baseball complex task force will not meet again or take action until the feasibility report is returned by the three consulting companies, Kruse said.

ABCNewspaper.com  June 27, 2012

Written by Tim Hennagir tim.hennagir@ecm-inc.com

+  LHB Offers Technical Staffing Placement ..., June 22, 2012

LHB Offers Technical Staffing Placement Service

June 22, 2012

LHB, Inc. now offers a new, technical staffing service for temporary and long-term placements through a new LLC company established under the LHB umbrella. LHB Technical Staffing provides pre-screened staff to large industry and design-based companies located in their clients’ offices. Since spring 2012, LHB has already placed numerous full-time, qualified individuals to large corporations located in the Midwest. The service helps companies by providing staff that can be quickly mobilized, are technically trained in the design industry, and can be used for short and long-term projects with minimal start-up costs. The growth of this service has contributed to LHB hiring fifty new staff so far this year for a total of nearly 200 employees.  LHB’s newly launched website homepage has more details.

For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450,Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit http://www.lhbcorp.com/.

+  Beaver Bay to get new trailhead center, June 15, 2012

Beaver Bay to get new trailhead center

June 15, 2012

Plans for a new trailhead center in Beaver Bay are moving along, with the public getting a chance last week to hear from engineers and designers.

The Thursday meeting in Beaver Bay was called to get feedback about the preliminary design concepts for the Beaver Bay Trailhead Project presented by engineering firm LHB.

The Beaver Bay Trailhead plans include a paved parking lot, restrooms and drinking water, an overlook of the Beaver River, and kiosks with historical and ecological information about the area.

The trailhead will be handicapped-accessible and LHB’s design will be “context sensitive,” meaning the trailhead will look similar to other waysides along the North Shore.

Bonnie Hundrieser, a senior planner for the Arrowhead Regional Development Commission, said about 20 people attended the meeting. Feedback came from residents, government, North Shore Scenic Drive Byway members, Beaver Bay Historical Society, and someone from the Parks and Trials division of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Some raised questions about security, whether it would be a gated parking lot and if it would be open all the time. The questions will be considered during the preliminary planning process, Hundrieser said.

The style of bathroom at the site is another concern – a vault or one with conventional plumbing. The Beaver Bay City Council will have to consider maintenance costs since the city is responsible for the upkeep of the facility.

“This is a pretty important topic because the only public place to stop and use a restroom is the Holiday gas station in town,” Hundrieser said. “From what I hear it is heavily used and an additional visitor stop would be greatly appreciated by everyone in the city.”

The trailhead is at the corner of Highway 61 and County Road 4 as a stop along the Gitchi-Gami State Trail. Construction is set to begin in 2014 and should only last through one season, opening to the public in 2015.

By: Amber Ooley, Lake County News Chronicle

+  St. Paul details environmental assessmen..., June 12, 2012

St. Paul details environmental assessment of Lilydale Park project

June 12, 2012

The city of St. Paul has posted its environmental assessment of planned improvements at Lilydale Regional Park online at tinyurl.com/2er5hfo.

Plans being prepared by LHB Architects for the St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department call for several updates to the 384-acre park, including the realignment of Lilydale Road/Water Street, trail enhancements, removal of former dump sites and the creation of a central gathering area with restroom facilities and water service.

Plans also call for better nonmotorized access to Pickerel Lake, the burial of existing power lines and utilities, and improved views of the Mississippi River from Water Street. There’s even a proposed dog park.

Comments will be accepted during a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. June 18 at Neighborhood House, 179 E. Robie St. Written comments can be sent through July 11 to Alice Messer, St. Paul Department of Parks and Recreation, 400 City Hall Annex, 25 W. Fourth St., St. Paul, MN 55101.

— Frederick Melo

Pioneer Press

+  AIA Minneapolis Merit Award Winner, June 7, 2012

AIA Minneapolis Merit Award Winner

June 7, 2012

 

On June 21, 2012, LHB will receive a 2012 AIA Minneapolis Merit Award for the design of the Nordic Skiing Timing Shed located at Wirth Park in Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, along with the City of Lakes Nordic Ski Foundation, commissioned this charming building specifically for the Junior Olympic Nordic Ski Championships at Theodore Wirth Park in 2011. This simple and lightweight structure was designed by Bruce Cornwall, AIA, to allow clear views of the start/finish area by timing judges and race officials, add to the festive spirit of competition, and complement the natural beauty of the park. In addition, the building is mobile, and sits on large tubular “skis” to allow race organizers to relocate the stadium area depending on the configuration of the race course. The building was designed to be “off the grid,” and built in under 30 days–just in time for the event, which was noted by many as one of the best Junior Olympics ever. Since the Junior Olympics, the moveable shed has been used for many other races including professional Super Tour races, the Mayor’s Challenge, and the International Paraplegic Nordic Ski Championships.

Nordic Skiing Timing Shed at Wirth Park

+  LHB Architect Receives Minnesota NAHRO H..., June 1, 2012

LHB Architect Receives Minnesota NAHRO Housing and Community Development Achievement Award

June 1, 2012

Kim Bretheim, architect and leader of the housing group at LHB’s Minneapolis office, received the Housing and Community Development Achievement Award during the annual conference of the Minnesota Chapter of the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials (NAHRO). The award was granted during NAHRO’s annual banquet at Madden’s resort in Baxter, Minnesota on Thursday, May 24, 2012. The award recognizes an individual who is not a member of Minnesota NAHRO, but has significantly contributed to the success of the chapter and the housing and community development programs operated by the membership.

Bretheim was honored to be nominated for the award by Kari Gill, Deputy Executive Director for the Dakota County Community Development Agency.  Gill was also recognized with the Outstanding Achievement Award, recognizing an individual member for their exceptional accomplishments and continuing success in their housing and/or community development career.

Bretheim, Gill, and their respective teams have collaborated for many years, successfully completing more than 600 units of affordable housing throughout Dakota County, including the innovative Lincoln Place supportive housing for homeless youth in Eagan, Minnesota. Lincoln Place received LEED-H Gold certification from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC), placing it at the top of the list for sustainable, affordable housing projects in Minnesota.

Quote from Kim Bretheim

+  Our view: Armory site grows; now let’s..., May 17, 2012

Our view: Armory site grows; now let’s get it filled

May 17, 2012

Every year or two, it seems, the folks who saved the historic Duluth Armory — and who have been working so hard to give it a new life — procure particularly positive press coverage. Tuck-pointing completed. Leaky roof replaced. Gobs of garbage removed and hauled away. The building secured and made safe.

This week brought another of those moments: the news of an expanding Armory site.

Armory Arts and Music Center officials announced in a meeting yesterday with the News Tribune Opinion page and with a News Tribune reporter that it purchased the abandoned London Road property next door to the Armory that once was Duluth’s first Perkins restaurant and that more recently was a travel agency office. In the future it most likely will be used for parking, whether as a surface lot or ramp.

It turns out concerns about parking have been scaring away some prospective new Armory tenants, the officials said.

“With that piece of property we have the whole block now. That takes care of the parking issues we’ve had for a number of years,” said Project Manager Mark Poirier, who took a leave of absence from LHB Engineers to work on the Armory full-time. “(Parking has) always been a question.”

To read the complete article from the Duluth News Tribune click on the link below.

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/231744/group/Opinion/

+  Saint Paul Heritage Preservation Awards, May 15, 2012

Saint Paul Heritage Preservation Awards

May 15, 2012

The Saint Paul Heritage Preservation 22nd Annual Awards Ceremony was held on May 15th, 2012. LHB’s project, Boy Scout Base Camp located at Fort Snelling, received the Adaptive Reuse Award for the restoration of the facility.

+  Duluth Preservation Alliance 31st Annual..., May 14, 2012

Duluth Preservation Alliance 31st Annual Awards

May 14, 2012

The Duluth Preservation Alliance held its 31st Annual Awards ceremony at the Greysolon Plaza on Monday, May 14th, 2012. LHB’s project, Gimaajii Mino Bimaadiziyaan (formerly known as YWCA) received an award for the restoration efforts of the facility.

+  Finance & Commerce names Top Projec..., May 11, 2012

Finance & Commerce names Top Projects of 2011

May 11, 2012

LHB received two Top Projects Awards from Finance & Commerce for work on the 4100 Minnetonka Blvd/Edina Realty office in St. Louis Park and for the Greenleaf Apartments and SpringHouse Ministry Center located in Minneapolis.

Projects were judged for their degree of difficulty, creativity in design, innovative construction techniques, cooperation among contractors and management, and sustainability efforts. Projects had to have been completed in 2011 to be eligible for the honors.

Twenty-six projects were selected for F&C’s fifth annual edition of Top Projects. Each project will be featured in the daily newspaper starting June 26.

To read the entire article and see a comprehensive list of the 2011 Top Projects awarded click on link below:

http://finance-commerce.com/2012/05/finance-commerce-names-top-projects-of-2011/

+  Experiences: An Associate Member Discuss..., May 10, 2012

Experiences: An Associate Member Discusses Convention’s Significance

May 10, 2012

 

Tu-Anh Bui, Assoc. AIA, is a designer at LHB; Bui’s focus is on designing sustainable, affordable homes in Minnesota. Her career mission is to be “socially responsive” and help to alleviate homelessness while promoting decent homes for all.

Tu-Anh joined the AIA in 2003, and in 2005 became co-chair of the AIA Minnesota Housing Advocacy Committee. In addition to her involvement with the AIA, Tu-Anh has been a member of Architecture for Humanity’s Minnesota chapter since 2005. She has served as the regional associates director for the north central states region, and as knowledge director for the National Associates Committee.

To read more follow the link below:

http://www.aia.org/conferences/nationalconvention/AIAB094084

+  New Helland Student Center Grand Opening, May 3, 2012

New Helland Student Center Grand Opening

May 3, 2012

After a dramatic renovation and expansion, the new and improved Helland Student Center and the Fine Arts lobby opened their doors for the start of spring semester, 2012 at Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MCTC).

Both spaces have been transformed in a way that complements the rest of campus and offers many expanded features. MCTC students are quickly making these new spaces their home. Some of the new features include: an expanded Student Health Clinic, a multi-purpose event space, a convenience store, a smoothie bar and an expansive study space, just to name a few.

MCTC hosted the event on May 3rd to celebrate the grand re-opening.

Link to video of the New Helland Student Center and Fine Arts Building

+  Blaine youth baseball complex gets study, May 2, 2012

Blaine youth baseball complex gets study

May 2, 2012

 

By Tim Hennagir on May 2, 2012 at 3:48 pm

ABCNewspaper.com

The National Sports Center Foundation (NSCF) has selected a consulting firm to study the feasibility of building a large youth baseball complex in Blaine.

The foundation announced last week in a news release that it had awarded the $60,000 contract to Minneapolis and Dallas-based Conventions, Sports & Leisure International (CSL).

CSL International will partner with Baltimore, Md.-based Ripken Design Group, and Minneapolis-based LHB Architects to complete the study something this summer.

“We’re honored to partner with the National Sports Center on this exciting project,” said CSL Partner Jay Lenhardt in the April 24 news release.

“The NSC has a worldwide reputation as a premier amateur sports campus. Our consulting team is looking forward to the opportunity to help guide continued growth at this unique facility.”

Ripken Design assists municipalities, ownership groups and investors with design, management and development of unique sports and activity complexes as well as stadiums.

The feasibility study will address development of a large NSC baseball youth complex and compare that use with other possible field development uses.

“The consulting company brought on the partners,” said Barclay Kruse, the NSC’s chief communications officer. “Everybody who did bid for the job did the same thing. The Ripkin Group brings the baseball expertise and LHB is a local architectural firm. They will bring different skill sets to the finished product.”

The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) has provided $40,000 to fund the baseball feasibility study, Kruse said.

According to Kruse, the Minnesota Twins Baseball Club, Anoka County, the city of Blaine and NSC are providing $5,000 each.

“It’s going to be a couple of months to complete the study,” Kruse said.

“We needed an outside voice on this. We could not be our own project consultant.”

A National Sports Center (NSC) youth baseball complex task force will not meet again or take action until the project feasibility report is returned, Kruse said last week in an interview.

The task force is currently exploring the concept of adding 16 youth baseball fields located on land directly north of 105th Avenue N.E. and four fields by Radisson Road.  A stadium of undetermined size would be located on soccer fields B1 and B2.

Plans show nine new soccer fields marked N1-N4, O1-O4 and P1 would be placed to the north near 109th Avenue N.E. as well as a new parking lot (Lot F).

Placement of four additional ball fields has been suggested across Radisson Road to the east of the Victory Links golf course.

A proposed access road would connect those fields to Blaine City Hall parking.

Steve Olson, the NSC’s chief operating officer, said in an April 24 news release additional NSC field development will become a reality at some future point.

“We want to do an in-depth comparison of several different development scenarios,” Olson said. “We’re looking to CSL to provide us with a development road map.”

Tim Hennagir is at tim.hennagir@ecm-inc.com

+  Northwoods League exploring Blaine ballp..., April 30, 2012

Northwoods League exploring Blaine ballpark

April 30, 2012

 

Another effort to bring a summer-collegiate Northwoods League team to the National Sports Center in Blaine, Minn., will be studied in the coming two months. The National Sports Center in suburban Minneapolis is a large, multifacility complex housing arenas, soccer facilities and ballfields; it’s been eyed for several years by the Northwoods League and potential team owners as the site of a ballpark. The two-month study, to be performed by Ripken Design, CSL International and LHB Architects, will examine two issues: whether a Northwoods League ballpark is viable and what it would take to make the complex being the largest youth baseball facility in the United States, which would include an indoor training facility and domed practice fields.

Currently there is no Northwoods League team in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area; St. Cloud and Mankato are the closest teams.

RELATED STORIES: Northwoods League eyes Blaine team

+  LHB Staff News, April 30, 2012

LHB Staff News

April 30, 2012

Duluth, MN (April 30, 2012) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Ana Aviles, joins our Duluth Industrial Group as a Structural Designer

Diana Berbig, joins our Minneapolis Office as an Administrative Assistant

Michael Bilben, joins our Duluth Office as an Electrical Designer

Autumn Gibeau, joins our Duluth Office as an Administrative Assistant

Ryan Grunklee, joins our Minneapolis Office as an Architect

Robert Rollin, joins our Duluth Office as a Pipeline Designer

Jonathan Rose, joins our Duluth Office as a Designer

Patricia Rutka, joins our Duluth Office as a Finance Coordinator

Raymond Somrock, joins our Duluth Office as an Electrical Designer

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. We are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  Design Firm Studies Potential Blaine You..., April 27, 2012

Design Firm Studies Potential Blaine Youth Baseball Complex

April 27, 2012

A design company has been hired to complete a two-month feasibility study for a youth baseball complex in Blaine. The plans would make the complex the largest of its kind in the nation. Ripken Design will complete the initial study and site plans. It will work with CDL, International and LHB Architects on the project. Ripken Design will look at the economic impact, number of manageable fields, and programming opportunities for the field. The study will also look at the potential for an indoor training facility and domed practice fields. The site would be on land currently owned by the National Sports Center.

By: Jennie Olson, KSTP.COM

+  Supportive Housing Center Set to Open in..., April 10, 2012

Supportive Housing Center Set to Open in Duluth

April 10, 2012

Jana Hollingsworth, Duluth News Tribune

Until last week, it had been six years since Bernie Makes Room-Lussier had a home of her own.

On Monday, she had begun unpacking bags in the new two-bedroom apartment she shares with her 13-year-old daughter inside the $8.5 million Gimaajii Mino Bimaadizyann, which means “We are, all of us together, beginning a good life” in Ojibwe.

The 29-unit supportive housing center in the former YWCA building downtown has been in the works by the American Indian Community Housing Organization since 2006. The grand opening is Wednesday.

“This is just a blessing,” Makes Room-Lussier said. “We’ve been couch-surfing; it’s nothing stable for me or my daughter. It’s really affected her grades. Now that she has her own place to call home, I hope her grades turn around.”

The family was the first to sign a lease for the building, which targets homeless American Indians but is open to anyone who meets income requirements. The waiting list is 180 people long.

The housing comes with optional social services, modern and traditional healing services, and an American Indian learning and cultural center. Residents can get help with applying for benefits and jobs, chemical dependency, mental health, domestic abuse and spirituality. The American Indian Center will focus on things like Ojibwe language classes, cultural practices such as beading, and children’s programs. An elder advisory council also is in the works.

There’s space for tutoring, exercise, cooking classes and computer use. An art gallery filled with work by young American Indians is housed in the historic building, which maintains many of its original features.

The building at 202 W. Second St. fills an enormous need both for affordable housing in Duluth and for a gathering space for urban American Indians, said Janelle Burton, the service coordinator for the American Indian Community Housing Organization.

“It’s a culturally specific place where folks can go and find people like they are, (with) the same backgrounds and cultural interests,” Burton said. “It feels comfortable here; it feels welcoming.”

American Indians are more likely than any other group in Duluth to be homeless, according to data gathered by AICHO. American Indians make up a third of the city’s homeless population but represent 3 percent of the entire population.

Those who qualify for the one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments include people who have experienced long-term homelessness for either a year or more, or four times in the past three years; those escaping domestic violence; elders and extended family — a recognition that American Indian families often have non-immediate relatives living with them; and the working poor, those who are at risk of losing housing or who are living in substandard housing.

The project, which will reach its capacity of about 70 people by the end of June, is the first of its kind in Duluth to use tax credits for historic preservation, AICHO representatives say, and has a long list of contributors.

Makes Room-Lussier has lived in Duluth since 1978 but is from Rosebud, S.D., where she is enrolled with the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. She said Monday she is grateful for those who helped create the space. The stability of the housing and the services offered will help her achieve her goal of re-enrolling in college to become a nurse.

“I feel safe,” she said. “I hope I can become a contributing member of the community; I want to be a positive role model for Native American women and children. It’s very difficult to be a single parent. … I am excited to see how they will help residents as far as getting life back on track, giving them skills so they won’t be homeless again, and helping you get a job and helping children with education. It’s the only way you can make it in this world.”

If you go

The American Indian Community Housing Organization hosts a grand opening of its 29-unit affordable supportive housing development in the former downtown YWCA at 1 p.m. Wednesday at 202 W. Second St.

A free feast of “Indian Tacos” made with fry bread and wild rice salads and tours will follow the program.

The program includes entertainment and recognition of donors, volunteers and community and tribal leaders.

 

Sign greets visitors to supportive housing center<:figcaption>The Ojibwe phrase “Together we are beginning a good life” greets everyone who walks in the door in the new supportive housing apartments in the former downtown YWCA. The grand opening of the $8.5 million dollar project is Wednesday. The building has 29 apartments for former homeless families and individuals. (Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com

+  Duluth ultra-runner to spend 16 hours on..., April 9, 2012

Duluth ultra-runner to spend 16 hours on a YMCA treadmill

April 9, 2012

Stop by the Duluth Area YMCA anytime today, any time, and you’ll see Chris Gardner. He’ll be the one on the middle of three treadmills in the lobby of the building at 302 W. First St.

Gardner, 35, a structural engineer, plans to be in motion from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., approximately 16 hours (not counting breaks), in a fundraising effort for the Strong Kids Campaign.

The ultra-runner, who has won races of 50 and 100 miles, has never attempted a treadmill run of such duration. It’s the result of a moment of clarity, an epiphany, experienced while driving alone on a business trip, said Gardner.

“I have always admired athletes and how humble most are and how they can have a positive effect on others,” said Gardner. “And I looked at my running and how selfish it can be, to go off and run for three or four, or more hours.

“I have a deep and devout faith, and came to a decision that I needed a better, higher purpose for my running.”

Today’s event is being labeled as a Purpose Driven Run. Gardner’s goal is to complete 100 miles and raise $3,000 for a program which ensures no youngster is turned away from YMCA participation.

Gardner has been a distance runner for a decade and has finished six 26.2-mile races, including Grandma’s Marathon, and about 12 longer races. He won the 2008 Superior Trail 100-Mile run and the 2010 Minnesota Voyageur Trail Ultramarathon 50-Mile race, but since then has faced some challenges. He was diagnosed with skin cancer in November 2010 and had a 2½-inch patch on his left forearm removed. He suffered a stress fracture in his right foot last May and didn’t return to running until October.

“The cancer scare dropped me to my knees and then, when I started back to run (after the stress fracture), it was very slow. I ran 15 minutes twice a week and then a half hour twice a week,” said Gardner, who with wife, Christy, have two daughters, Ella, 4, and Isabel, 2. “Part of my faith is to take each day, and think only of that day and not look ahead or behind.”

When Angel Hohenstein, the YMCA’s membership coordinator, approached Gardner about a fundraising run, he said no. But within five minutes changed his mind and saw the treadmill experience as what he was looking for.

“It’s an opportunity to put yourself out there in public and try to help make a difference,” said Gardner, who attends First Lutheran Church.

He’s never run more than 26 miles at one time on a treadmill but says he’s ready for today’s attempt. He’ll subsist on a blueberry-flavored GU Energy Gel (100 calories three times per hour), defizzed Coke (8 ounces per hour) and electrolyte tablets every half hour. Every 6-10 miles he expects to take a three-minute break to eat or for a restroom stop, just like during an ultramarathon.

Gardner, a native of Red Lion, Pa., who attended Lehigh University and is employed by LHB Inc., will have three pair of his favorite running shoes (New Balance 730), three pair of socks and a number of T-shirts. The YMCA building temperature is expected to be about 68 degrees from opening at 6 a.m. to closing at 10 p.m.

 

By: Kevin Pates, Duluth News Tribune

 

Ultra-runner Chris Gardner will be on a Duluth Area YMCA treadmill from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. today while raising money for YMCA youngsters.

+  Wind Turbine Foundations, March 30, 2012

Wind Turbine Foundations

March 30, 2012

LHB donated foundation structural and associated electrical design services to the Mesabi Range Technical College (MRTC) for a wind turbine foundation at their facility for use in their Wind Energy Technology program.  The turbine is now a valuable part of the MRTC training program.  The MRTC foundation is constructed on soil.

A second wind turbine foundation, designed by Jennifer French, in Silver Bay will be constructed soon as well. Tthe Silver Bay foundation is designed for a rock anchor application.

 

Students assisting with base mat pour.

+  Dakota County CDA Board Recognizes LEED ..., March 30, 2012

Dakota County CDA Board Recognizes LEED Award for Lincoln Place

March 30, 2012

The U. S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has approved the certification of Lincoln Place as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Home with a gold rating. This is the first gold rated project for new apartment construction in a suburban community in Minnesota. Commissioners and staff recognized receipt of the award from USGBC at the February meeting. Kim Bretheim and Annie Ryan, were the project architects from LHB.

Referenced from the CDA Activity Report, March 2012

+  Skyline Bridge to Finally be Restored, March 23, 2012

Skyline Bridge to Finally be Restored

March 23, 2012

+  Making a plan for the Cloquet parks, March 12, 2012

Making a plan for the Cloquet parks

March 12, 2012

 

Published February 12, 2012, 03:06 PM

Cloquet wants community input to develop first-ever Master Parks Plan. Future plans for all of Cloquet’s parks and trails, including Pinehurst Park, will be discussed at a city-wide meeting starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, in the commons area at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College.

By: Jana Peterson/jpeterson@pinejournal.com, Pine Journal

As the sun dropped behind the hills west of Cloquet’s Pinehurst Park Monday, temperatures dropped and so did the pucks as a group of hockey players played a pickup game on the ice. Anyone driving past the park on the busy Highway 33 could easily enjoy a perfect Minnesota moment, the hockey players framed by the swimming pond and softball field behind the boards of the hockey rink.

Those drivers might now realize they’re looking at “the jewel of the park system,” in the words of assistant City Engineer Caleb Peterson. Yet a critical winter element of that park, the outdoor hockey rink, could disappear if the city goes ahead with possible plans to pave the parking lot.

Don’t like that idea? Favor summer parking over winter ice? Peterson wants to hear from you, and your friends.

Future plans for all of Cloquet’s parks and trails, including Pinehurst Park, will be discussed at a city-wide meeting starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, in the commons area at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, 2101 14th St., Cloquet. Everyone is encouraged to come; food will be provided.

The meeting is the first step in formulating a master parks plan, something the city has never done before. Although Cloquet boasts a number of park features, from sporting fields to cross country trails and more, the system has been built piece by piece over the years.

On Wednesday, consultants from LHB Design Firm, which was hired by the city to help draft a parks plan, will help facilitate the meeting, but they’ve promised that it won’t be a lecture, more of a brain-storming session. Older children who are able to participate in small group discussions about the park system’s strengths and weaknesses are welcome, as are folks of all ages.

LHB’s Lydia Major said the first meeting is really about gathering information, opinions and ideas about the parks system as a whole from the people who use it. What are the strengths and weaknesses? What will make the parks better? What events are needed? How can things be better connected? Have people seen wonderful park systems elsewhere they which could be replicated in Cloquet?

Peterson said he is hopeful that a healthy number of interested residents will turn out for the meeting, despite a history of citizens not participating in activities designed to plan for the future of Cloquet.

“I don’t know why people don’t come, they’re busy I guess,” he said. “I think if it’s not something that will directly impact them tomorrow, they stay home. And part of it might be the format of most meetings. Maybe they think their input won’t be valued or heard.

”He noted, however, that part of the reason the city chose to hire LHB was because the firm has had great success with getting citizens involved and uses some unconventional methods to increase community engagement in the process.

Major said people should plan to be at Wednesday’s meeting for at least two hours. The bulk of that time – after a 20-minute presentation – will be spent in small group activities, she said.

“We’ve had what sounded like crazy ideas come out of these small groups but people have banded together and made it happen,” she said, referring to a kayak trail that came out of a Roseville, Minn., meeting. “There is also a lot of overlap between groups, but that’s good too, because that also tells you what ideas may have a lot of support.”

For more information about the meeting, call the city of Cloquet at 218-879-6758 or visit the city’s website at www.ci.cloquet.mn.us.

+  Rochester’s Silver Creek Corner Apartm..., March 7, 2012

Rochester’s Silver Creek Corner Apartments Selected as Inaugural Feature for March, 2012

March 7, 2012

Located in Rochester, MN, Silver Creek Corner Apartments for chronically homeless adults with alcohol dependency is the only housing of its type in Southeastern Minnesota. The project is the result of a unique collaboration between Olmsted County, developer Center City Housing Corp., and many other entities.

According to an Olmsted County study, Silver Creek Corner Apartments will save thousands of dollars in reduced emergency room costs, detoxification expenses, law enforcement and judicial involvement.

Minnesota Housing Partnership’s Impact Spotlight project-of-the-month celebrates the work of affordable housing partners in creating healthy, sustainable communities. Pace-setting projects are selected based on ingenuity in housing development and collaborative efforts linking housing for low-to-moderate income families to transportation, jobs, or services.

Read the full story of Silver Creek Corner Apartments at  http://mhponline.org/impact/silver-creek-corner-apartments

+  100-year-old building was challenge to f..., March 4, 2012

100-year-old building was challenge to fix

March 4, 2012

 

Duluth News Tribune – Published March 04, 2012, 12:00 AM

To say the renovation and restoration of the Fannie Rose Building was extensive is an understatement. The designers, engineers and contractors who worked on the project were challenged by a 100-year-old building that was built long before modern engineering standards.

The key players included:

Cheryl Fosdick of CF Design Ltd., who served as architect for the design phase, faced many structural and aesthetic challenges.

The goal, she said, was to “bring back the presence of this unusual building on an important corner of the city, yet simplify it for today’s fast-moving society.”

It was Fosdick who chose authentic yet unexpected color palettes that are used throughout the building. She calls them “visual candy” because they’re a treat for the eye.

Kraus-Anderson served as general contractor on phase one. Jeff Iisakka, its director of operations on the project, said the building is a timeless beauty, and its renovation is even more meaningful because it once was earmarked for razing.

Bruce Caulfield, architect for phase two, faced the challenge of adding a back entrance to a structure built into the side of a hill. He solved that problem by adding an elevator.

John Williams, who served as general contractor for phase two, said there was nothing they didn’t try to do the right way. Moreover, all the sub-contractors were local, and all the building materials were purchased locally.

Jennifer French, a structural engineer at LHB, ran into the unexpected as she worked on the project. The load bearing timber columns that supported the second floor and roof were found to be weakened with deteriorated wood near the foundation. So the columns had to be reinforced. Then, because the building’s lateral support was nearly non-existent, structural walls were built inside and secured to strengthen the entire building.

+  Cloquet Holds 1st Meeting To Create Mast..., February 15, 2012

Cloquet Holds 1st Meeting To Create Master Parks Plan

February 15, 2012

Fox21online.com   published on Wed, 02/15/2012 – 8:28pm

CLOQUET PIC.jpg
FOX 21 NEWS

 

CLOQUET – People in Cloquet met to develop the city’s very first parks plan Wednesday night.

Organizers in charge of creating the plan are hoping to gather a vision for the community about what they want their parks to become.

“We believe really strongly that the best ideas, the best designs come from the community. They come from people here who know this place the best,” said Lydia Major, an architecht with LHB, who is organizing the plan.
The city’s goal is to form a task force, send out survey’s, and have three or four community meetings before developing the plan.

+  New Duluth Police HQ Opens, February 8, 2012

New Duluth Police HQ Opens

February 8, 2012

 

Posted at: 02/08/2012 4:46 PM | Updated at: 02/08/2012 10:49 PM
By: Renee Passal

Mayor Don Ness, Police Chief Gordon Ramsay, St. Louis County Commissioner Keith Nelson, and Under Sheriff Dave Phillips officially opened the new Public Safety Building Wednesday that will house the Duluth Police headquarters with other city and county officials in attendance.

The new headquarters connects to the current St. Louis County Public Safety Building.

The police headquarters in Duluth City Hall proved inadequate over the years as the police force evolved to need additional space to store and process evidence and records, interview suspects, meet with victims, and have adequate space for staff. In 2009, the City Council approved a $17 million bond for the new police facility. The construction started in fall of 2010 and is now ready for occupation in the upcoming weeks.

“We are grateful for the support of the community, the City Council, and St. Louis County. This facility serves as a great example of a successful city and county partnership. Not Only will we be able to work more efficiently and effectively with our new tools but it will strengthen our community relationships and partnerships. We remain committed to providing the best quality services and look forward to doing so with a newfound sense of pride,” said Police Chief Gordon Ramsay.

The City of Duluth and St. Louis County looked to co-locate the new police headquarters to provide efficiency through shared spaces rather than duplicating spaces. The new building is linked to the county’s building at two locations. The existing building was constructed in 2007 and houses 911 administration, the call center and the Sheriff’s office and support space, including the adjacent “Tech Garage” housing County radio installation and repair functions. The facility has critical shared space for such things as a lobby area, training & conferences, a community meeting room, turnout, interview & break rooms, fitness center, records, sally port, evidence and processing.

Duluth Police officers will maintain their presence at designated substations throughout the city. Parking violations will continue to be handled in City Hall or they can be paid by mail or online credit card transaction.

The City hired the design team of LHB, local Architect and Engineers of Record with Design Architect SRBL. RJS was the construction company.

Officers will start moving in, in the next couple of weeks.

There was a public open house on Wednesday evening.

+  Do your SharePoint, February 1, 2012

Do your SharePoint

February 1, 2012

+  LHB’s Cascade Meadow Wetlands ..., February 1, 2012

LHB’s Cascade Meadow Wetlands & Environmental Science Center Attains LEED Platinum Certification

February 1, 2012

Minneapolis, Minn. (February 1, 2012) – Cascade Meadow is one of only nine LEED Platinum Certified projects in Minnesota and the first environmental center to achieve platinum certification. LHB provided the architectural, landscape architectural, and civil and structural engineering design services for the project. The mechanical and electrical engineering design was provided by LKPB Engineers with construction services provided by Alvin E. Benike, Inc.. Cascade Meadow is an environmental science and education center located in Rochester, Minnesota. The project was developed to be a resource for youth, the public, teachers, business leaders, builders, and community groups. The 16,000 sq. ft.  facility features interactive exhibit spaces focused on wetlands, water and energy resources, a large meeting space, a classroom , a conference room, and offices for staff and on-site educators.

Cascade Meadow uses innovative and regionally appropriate materials throughout the site and building. To reduce summer solar heat gain, the building uses a white roofing membrane, strategically located glazing, and electrochromic windows that change opacity with a small electric current. Structural Insulated Panels (SIP’s) and Insulated Concrete Forms (ICF’s) maintain stable interior temperatures for reduced energy costs. The interior of the building uses sustainably harvested wood products and finishes with low or no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

A key component of the site design and educational program were the renewable energy systems implemented throughout the site. An “energy garden” highlights solar hot water systems, photovoltaic systems, and both horizontal- and vertical-axis wind turbine systems. In another part of the site, geothermal coils are placed in a gravel quarry that has been reclaimed as a wetland pond. A solar thermal system provides domestic hot water. Cascade Meadow is designed to use 53% less energy than code.

This project incorporates extensive  restored and created wetlands where the management of unique wetland habitats can be experienced first-hand. Native plants are used throughout the site.   The site also highlights an extensive system of best management practices for stormwater including pervious pavements, a bio-retention cell system, native plantings, and green roofs. Natural functions are integrated into all aspects of the design and are even featured as sculptural elements. To learn more about this unique facility feel free to visit www.cascademeadow.org.

+  Tenants Go for the Green Build-out, January 23, 2012

Tenants Go for the Green Build-out

January 23, 2012

 

LHB staff, Rick Carter and David Williams, quoted in Finance and Commerce Focus on Energy – January 2012 Edition.

Tenants go for the green build-out

Posted: 3:26 pm Mon, January 23, 2012
By Dan Emerson

A glass-walled conference room at Nilan Johnson Lewis, a Minneapolis law firm that developed an ecology-conscious space on two floors of the One Financial Plaza building. (Staff photo: Bill Klotz)

Interior design in law offices traditionally has featured pricey, imposing furniture, expensive paneling, carpeting and artwork, and other opulent touches. But the Minneapolis law firm of Nilan Johnson Lewis emphatically broke with that tradition when it developed its ecology-conscious space on two floors of the One Financial Plaza building.

The LEEDcertified, 77,000-square-foot office, designed by Minneapolis-based Cuningham Group architects, offers a lengthy list of earth-friendly and energy-saving elements: sustainable hardwoods and other locally sourced materials, high-efficiency plumbing and light fixtures, and low VOC (volatile organic compound) paints and carpeting.

And, in the demolition process, Greiner Construction diverted at least 80 percent of the materials from landfills by repurposing or recycling.

Local contractors, architects and landlords say the green build-out trend is growing and can benefit even small space users with limited budgets. Along with sending a socially responsible message, green improvements also can yield significant financial benefits, said Kim Ess, the law firm’s chief operating officer.

After the firm moved into its new office in late 2009, a detailed study showed that the improvements reduced the space’s energy consumption by 35 percent. The daylight-filled space also conveys a welcoming message to clients and employees, Ess said.

Obviously, smaller office tenants do not typically have the same degree of control over their leased spaces as a large business that is leasing two whole floors. Smaller tenant-improvement budgets are one reason.

But they can apply some of the same eco-friendly and energy saving improvements, Ess said. “Much of what we did involved lighting and power consumption.” Along with choosing energy-efficient office equipment, she said, “you can use lamps and fixtures that not only consume less power but also generate less heat.”

Chuck Palm, vice president of engineering and sustainability for Bloomington-based Cushman & Wakefield/NorthMarq Real Estate Services, agrees that even small or mid-size office tenants can make choices that will lead to significant energy savings. Energy Star-rated PCs, copy machines and other office equipment are examples, he said.

Several national organizations have developed “model” green leases for use by landlords and tenants, including the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA).

Beyond the usual legal stipulations, a green lease addresses key environmental issues such as indoor air quality, energy use, carbon credits, recycling, insurance, maintenance, operating costs, tenant improvements, green cleaning specs and building regulations.

Eric Dueholm, NAI Welsh’s vice president for corporate solutions, said he has not seen much demand for green leases in this market, “although there is a lot of good information” available.

“What I have seen — and what I think is most likely to continue — is proactive efforts on the part of the landlord to ‘green’ their operations and more requests from tenants for green build-outs,” Dueholm said.

NAI Welsh has recently been making green upgrades to a number of its vacant office spaces to “make them more sustainable and more marketable,” he said. “In a lot of older spaces, it’s work that needs to be done anyway.”

David Williams, a building performance specialist and senior mechanical engineer with LHB Engineers and Architects in Minneapolis, points out that landlords and tenants can agree to split the cost of energy-saving improvements.

Williams suggests asking the landlord for data on how much energy has been used to heat, cool and light a space especially if it will be rehabbed — “to see if we can split potential savings by either operating the building better or improving something lessees have control over.”

Palm wishes more office tenants would take advantage of green tenant-improvement opportunities. “I do quite a bit of auditing of commercial spaces, and it surprises me how naïve people are about energy use,” he said. “Even though there is a lot of opportunity to save money, we don’t get nearly as much demand as I would like to see. Most tenants are more concerned with having a nice-looking office space, not necessarily whether it is going to be energy-efficient.”

For example, “there are opportunities missed in choosing light fixtures that look beautiful but may not be that efficient,” Palm said. “Even with standard, 4-foot fluorescent bulbs, many people are not aware that there are multiple options available that could be 20 percent more efficient. I don’t think those are usually presented as options when architects are pulling together plans.”

Of course, some tenants, landlords and architects are greener than others. “We’re always looking at energy efficiency and occupant health, from soup to nuts,” said Rick Carter, a principal with LHB Architects.

“In some cases, that means using less materials or salvaging materials from the build-out. Or you might not have (fixed) walls dividing up the space, which is also a green strategy,” said Carter, recently named one of the Green Building Certification Institute’s first 34 LEED Fellows, chosen for their leadership.

“Sometimes, it depends on a company’s culture,” said Andi Simon, senior director of project management for Cushman & Wakefield/NorthMarq Real Estate Services. “Before they lease, some tenants want to know what the landlord is offering for sustainable practices.”

Simon said clients who opt for green features typically do so for altruistic reasons rather than focusing only on costs and payback. “Some people feel it’s the right thing to do and that it supports their culture and business platform.”

+  Lake Superior College to Celebrate Grand..., December 27, 2011

Lake Superior College to Celebrate Grand Opening of New Health and Science Building Jan. 6

December 27, 2011

(Duluth, Minn., Dec. 27, 2011) – Lake Superior College (LSC) will celebrate the grand opening of its new Health and Science building on Friday, Jan. 6 from 1 to 3 p.m. The public is invited to the celebration.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony, scheduled for 1:30 p.m., will include Minnesota Lt. Governor Yvonne Prettner-Solon; Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) Chancellor Steven Rosenstone; LSC President-Emeritus Kathleen Nelson, and LSC President Patrick Johns.

“Our new Health and Science building is designed to support the training needs for a growing and specialized healthcare workforce in the Arrowhead region and beyond,” said LSC President Patrick Johns. “This facility provides our students and faculty with top-notch teaching and learning space that is customized for our nursing, allied health, and science programs.”

The 36,712-square-foot building includes teaching laboratories, a hospital nursing simulation center, and “smart” classrooms.  Programs housed in the new facility include nursing, respiratory therapy, surgical technology medical laboratory technician, phlebotomy, medical assistant, geology, biology and earth sciences.

“The new building will help lessen concerns about scheduling and crowding,” said Hanna Erpestad, dean of liberal arts and sciences. “The number of our students pursuing a transfer or a nursing or allied health degree has significantly increased over the past years, causing us to schedule science labs back-to-back every weekday and during many Saturdays.”

Erpestad also noted that new natural sciences space provide immediate access to the college’s unique geography and geology. “This design allows students to connect their indoor lab work with experimentation and discovery in the natural outdoor setting,” said Erpestad.

According to Pam Elstad, dean of allied health and nursing, science labs and classrooms serving LSC’s allied health and nursing programs have been in urgent need of expansion and updating for some time. “With today’s medical technology advances, you blink and things have changed,” she said.

“The new building will provide students spacious labs with state-of-the-art technology. We will now have private training and testing rooms; critical care rooms and patient care areas. Our expanded simulation labs, which mimic clinical settings, will allow our students to be better prepared for their actual student clinical experiences.”

The $12.1 million building was funded by the 2010 State of Minnesota bonding funds. The project received State of Minnesota funding for design in 2006. The Duluth office of LHB, Inc. and Ross-Barney Architects of Chicago designed the building. Shaw-Lundquist Associates, Inc., a St. Paul-based general contractor, constructed the building and the St. Paul-based Pegasus Group provided owner’s representative services.

The building’s design, construction, and operation follow LEED standards (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), an internationally recognized green building certification system. LEED provides requirements for the use of sustainable and non-toxic materials in construction and interior design, energy-efficient heating and ventilation systems, and other specific guidelines.

Construction highlights include:

– Twenty-five roof-mounted tubular skylights, manufactured by Solatube International, transfer natural sunlight into interior spaces of the building.  The skylights have a built-in diffuser which allows the user to shut-off the natural light if needed.  The Health and
Science building is the first MnSCU building approved to install tubular skylights.

– An accessible floor system design, raised 18 inches above a concrete slab, allows space for utilities below the floor instead of in the ceiling. This flooring system provides mechanical and electrical flexibility, and future access for renovations and conversions.

– Approximately 1,400 cubic yards of rock (equal to 1,750 tons) was excavated during construction. The landscaping around the new building recycles some of the bedrock.

Lake Superior College is a member of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) system.  With more than 4,500 students enrolled this fall semester, LSC is northeastern Minnesota’s largest two-year college.  LSC provides a wide range of programs and services, including liberal arts and science courses for transfer, technical programs intended to provide occupational skills, continuing education, and customized training for business and industry.  LSC is also a leader in Internet-delivered courses and programs in Minnesota.

Media contact: Janet Blixt, (218) 733-7774, cell (218) 393-6681, or j.blixt@lsc.edu

+  Cloquet City Council hires LHB to guide ..., December 24, 2011

Cloquet City Council hires LHB to guide the city’s master plan for parks

December 24, 2011

Cloquet City Council will pursue sales tax referendum

By: Jana Peterson, Pine Journal

With a new year rapidly approaching, Cloquet City Councilors and Mayor Bruce Ahlgren took time during a work session Tuesday to discuss whether or not to hold a vote on a half cent sales tax proposal in 2012 and to agree on how the city wants to develop its master parks plan.

The two are part of the same package, because the proposed sales tax would generate revenue to be used for specific items, including improvements for specific parks as well as city infrastructure projects and the extension of utilities to the city-owned property (now a swamp) at the intersection of Interstate 35 and Highway 33.

Such a sales tax could bring in $600,000 or more a year over a 30-year period, up to a maximum of $16.5 million.

Although the state legislature gave its approval to a request from Cloquet to hold a sales tax referendum vote during the last session, Cloquet wouldn’t have to hold the referendum next year. By law, the referendum vote must take place as part of a general election process, which means the council could have chosen to wait until 2014.

However, because the city is also planning to develop a master parks plan over the next nine months – which would detail many of the improvements the sales tax could pay for – city staff and elected officials agreed that it was best to act while residents are more engaged in the process.

When Councilor Neil Nemmers asked if city officials thought it would be a problem getting residents to approve the referendum, noting “you’re still raising taxes, after all,” Mayor Bruce Ahlgren said he feels really positive about the vote.

“I’ve brought this [sales tax idea] up to service groups for 10 years, I’ve never heard anyone speak out against it,” Ahlgren said. “And that includes the retired group, who are often more conservative.”

After all, he added, when people visit Duluth (where there’s a 1 cent sales tax) or Hermantown and Two

Harbors (where there’s a half cent sales tax), they are helping pay for improvements to those cities.

“In talking to the business community, they’re in favor,” the mayor said. “Anything you do to improve Cloquet will help them.”

Other cities that have recently passed sales tax referendums include Bemidji and Brainerd, City Administrator Brian Fritsinger added.

Fritsinger explained that the sales tax, if it passes, would capture revenue from people who live outside the community but come here to work, shop or play.

While many of the improvements outlined in the sales tax legislation will involve planning on the part of city engineers, the parks planning process is something city officials agree should be citizen driven. As such, city officials are looking for approximately 15 community members to serve on a task force and more to serve on subcommittees working with that task force.

“The task force would really spearhead the whole thing,” Fritsinger said, noting that a good parks plan needs to have lots of community input. “It would be their job to get the word out, talk to groups,

neighbors.”

The task force wouldn’t have to figure out the process alone. The council hired the LHB Inc. design firm to guide the city’s master plan for parks at its Dec. 6 meeting.

Fritsinger said the city is tentatively planning the first informational meeting on the parks plan process in late January. People interested in being part of the task force or who want to know more about the parks plan are encouraged to attend that meeting, which will be publicized in the Pine Journal, on the city’s website and several other places.

During Tuesday’s formal City Council meeting, councilors approve the renewal of the Friends of Animals contract for service and a new therapeutic massage therapist license for Maria Kunze. There were no public hearings and no presentations and the meeting lasted fewer than 10 minutes.

In council business, councilors unanimously approved:

• A revised fund balance policy. The policy was revised to comply with the Government Accounting Standards Board, which noted that cities should identify fund balance separately between non-spendable, restricted, committed, assigned or unassigned based on the relative strength of the constraints that control how specific amounts can be spent.

• A new loan review process that would include third party underwriting services by Bob Palmquist at Northspan for a cost of approximately $450 per loan. The county previously provided this service, but city officials worked with Palmquist before.

• A revised development agreement with Blackhoof Development, for the purchase of certain properties from the city for a housing development.

The Cloquet City Council will next meet on Jan. 3. Work sessions begin at 5:30 p.m. and the formal council meeting starts at 7 p.m. and is also televised live on CAT-7, the public access television station. Citizens are welcome to attend both meetings at City Hall.

+  LHB’s Maureen Colburn Receives AIA Min..., December 19, 2011

LHB’s Maureen Colburn Receives AIA Minnesota Young Architects Award

December 19, 2011

Maureen Colburn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, was recognized as one of two AIA Minnesota Young Architect Award Recipients at the AIA MN Awards Celebration held on Friday, December 2, 2011. The jury cited her “passionate commitment to sustainability and social activism in the community and architectural profession.” As a licensed architect for the last nine years, she has earned an impressive list of recognitions for her dedication to sustainable design and humanitarian efforts.

Colburn is a past Co-Chair of the AIA MN Committee on the Environment and was recognized in 2004 with an AIA MN Presidential Citation for her contributions to the committee’s work in promoting sustainable design within AIA and the profession. In 2005, she became LEED accredited as one of the early advocates of the rating system and has since successfully coordinated the effort to achieve LEED NC Gold for the first residence halls to be certified at this level in Minnesota: Cassat and Memorial Halls at Carleton College.

In 2004, Colburn cofounded the Minnesota Chapter of the international organization Architecture for Humanity, providing pro bono design solutions to humanitarian crises. Now the chapter has over 50 volunteer members, has held multiple charrettes for design projects, and has funded, designed, and built lockers for the homeless in two local shelters.

With LHB since 2004, Colburn has contributed as Project Architect and Project Manager on multi-family projects ranging from supportive housing to residence halls. Mike Fischer, 1996 AIA MN Young Architect Award Recipient and Senior Vice President at LHB, describes Colburn as having “a passion for sustainability, not only in her architectural work, but in how she lives her daily life. She also has a passion for helping others, whether managing affordable housing projects, leading humanitarian efforts locally and internationally, or just being the one who recognizes when a co-worker is having a bad day.”

+  LEED AP Homes and Gold Certification for..., December 14, 2011

LEED AP Homes and Gold Certification for LHB’s Anne Ryan

December 14, 2011

Anne Ryan, AIA, is the first LHB employee to complete the LEED Accredited Professionals (AP) Homes exam and is one of only nine professionals in Minnesota who has achieved this accreditation. Through her 16 years of experience, Ryan has developed an intuitive approach to design and has a special interest in working with clients on challenging projects, both large and small, that require a high level of creativity using a limited budget. In addition to design excellence, Ryan is skilled at managing multiple projects with a variety of green guidelines and requirements. One of Ryan’s 2010 projects, Lincoln Place, has just been certified as a LEED for Homes Gold Project.

Lincoln Place provides supportive housing for homeless youth and is owned and operated by the Dakota County Community Development Agency (CDA). The site is located in a master planned suburban redevelopment district near public transportation and commercial amenities. The three-story, 27,000 square-foot building includes 24 efficiencies, one caretaker apartment, offices, a conference room, a computer room, and support services spaces for the residents. This LEED for Homes Gold-certified project addresses energy efficiency, water and resource conservation, healthy indoor environmental quality, on-site stormwater management, and long-term durability. Sustainable strategies include enhanced building shell insulation, an irrigation system utilizing stormwater run-off, FSC-certified framing lumber, dual-flush toilets, and low volatile organic compounds (VOC) interior products.

LHB currently has 38 LEED Accredited Professionals, 14 of whom have specific credentials such as Building Design and Construction, Operations and Maintenance, Interior Design and Construction, LEED Fellow, and now LEED AP Homes.

+  Affordable housing design: Solid, but co..., November 10, 2011

Affordable housing design: Solid, but could be better

November 10, 2011

Article by: DON JACOBSON , Special to the Star Tribune

Updated: November 10, 2011 – 5:08 PM

Minnesota has long been known as a national leader in the development of affordable housing. But the political and financial tradeoffs that must be made to make new low-income housing happen sometimes can stifle innovative architectural designs that could make such housing more attractive to the communities they’re in and useful to the tenants who live there. That was among the messages a panel of local architects delivered to attendees at the American Institute of Architects convention held in Minneapolis this week. The panel discussed the findings of a study funded by the McKnight Foundation that tried to identify how affordable housing projects in Minnesota could improve their designs. Rosemary Dolata, a Minneapolis architect who moderated the forum, described an affordable housing scene in the Twin Cities in which a handful of firms perform most of the design work — and while the quality is good, it could be better if more professionals were lured into the field to question business-as-usual assumptions.

But getting more architects involved isn’t easy.

Dealing with the complex processes used to gain funding and approval for low-income housing can be a headache and a barrier to entry for many professionals, said Dolata, a former project manager for the nonprofit housing developer Aeon and a member of the AIA’s Housing Advocacy Committee. Also, government rules keep architectural fees for affordable housing artificially low. “With all the challenges involved, promoting innovation and great design is no small task,” she said. Better-designed affordable housing is more important than ever as the need for it steadily grows. The median income in Minnesota is falling at a time when rents are going up and apartment vacancy rates are at record lows, Dolata noted.

The McKnight Foundation study found that even some of the best new affordable housing projects in Minnesota used “thoughtful-but-modest” designs whose aim was to blend into the neighborhoods they were part of rather than utilize bold techniques seen in other parts of the country that could have made the housing more attractive.

Location, location

Another issue that can stifle innovative design in affordable housing is where the housing is located, panelists said. One of them, Kim Bretheim of LHB Architects, studied the Resource Access Center in Portland, Ore. — a supportive housing project for former drug and alcohol addicts — as part of the study.

He determined that its location at a high-profile spot in the city’s downtown prompted a very highquality design. “If you’ve ever been involved in affordable housing, among the first questions asked is … where is the cheapest and most nonoffensive site where we can locate these people?” Bretheim said. “And usually that’s in some kind of polluted industrial area on the edge of town.” But since the Portland project was meant to help revitalize a part of its central downtown, it demanded high-quality construction and “a great design” that included big windows that look out over a public park — where crime has dropped due to the eyes of the residents, Bretheim said.

The study also cited examples of highly innovative affordable housing in the Twin Cities.

Aeon’s 70-unit Crane Ordway Building in downtown St. Paul, designed by Cermak Rhoades Architects, was praised for its innovative ideas for converting long-vacant former industrial buildings into affordable housing.

Because the windows in the former warehouse were situated well above the heads of even the tallest people, some suggested they be cut bigger — which was rejected due the changes it would make in the historic façade, architect Todd Rhoades said.

Instead, he said, the firm came up with a way to slightly elevate living rooms in the units on low-cost platforms, bringing the windows to eye level. To address the challenge, the McKnight study recommended adjusting the design process to balance neighbors’ concerns with broader public policy goals; making reviews after tenants move in standard; allowing negotiations for architects’ fees, and establishing an affordable housing design awards program.

Don Jacobson is a St. Paul-based freelance writer. He can be reached at 651-501-4931.

+  LHB’s CEO Recognized as Volunteer of t..., October 25, 2011

LHB’s CEO Recognized as Volunteer of the Year

October 25, 2011

Duluth, Minn. (October 25, 2011) – LHB’s CEO Bill Bennett was named Volunteer of the Year at the Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce’s 141st annual award dinner on October 20, 2011. Bennett currently serves as LHB’s Chief Executive Officer and Chair of the Board.  He is a registered Professional Engineer in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan and Kansas. Bennett has lived in Duluth and been with LHB since 1980.

Bennett has a long history of participation in many types of community and civic engagements including numerous business and professional organizations.  His involvement with the Duluth Area Chamber of Commerce consists of serving on the Board and Executive Committee and acting as Vice Chair of Public Policy, through which he helped to create and Chair the Military Affairs Committee. With this committee, Bennett recently worked collaboratively with Chamber members and members of the Minnesota Air National Guard to develop the F16 Static Display at the entrance to the 148th Minnesota Air National Guard Base. Bennett recently traveled with the Committee to Washington DC to promote the establishment of Duluth as an Active Association Base which would bring active military to the Duluth base. In addition, Bennett participates on various other initiatives within the Chamber in order to further the Chamber’s mission as the premier advocate for commerce and industry by facilitating interaction among business, government, education, labor, and the greater community.

His other community services include serving as a member of the Minnesota Chamber Board of Directors, the Greater Downtown Council Board and Executive Committee, the United Way Board, the Local Advisory Boards for LISC and the Memorial Blood Centers, and as President and Board Chair of the American Council of Engineering Companies of Minnesota.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering and architectural firm with 160 employees, with offices throughout the Midwest. Founded in 1966, we serve a broad range of market sectors including Public Works and Structures, Pipeline, Industrial, Housing, Healthcare, Government, Education, and Commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612-752-6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB’s Rick Carter Awarded LEED Fellow ..., September 12, 2011

LHB’s Rick Carter Awarded LEED Fellow Designation

September 12, 2011

 

Duluth, Minn. (September 12, 2011) – On September 6th, the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) revealed the inaugural class of LEED Fellows which includes 34 of the world’s most distinguished green building professionals. The LEED Fellow Program is GBCI’s new and most prestigious designation, and it recognizes exceptional contributions to green building and significant professional achievement.

Rick Carter, from LHB, was selected as one of the green building leaders who have made significant contributions to the field of green building and sustainability at a regional and national level. As a current member and past-president of the USGBC’s MN Chapter, Carter has been instrumental in broadening the mission of USGBC throughout Minnesota by speaking to promote greener building practices, providing tours of LEED buildings, representing USGBC at advocacy meetings with legislators, and leading LHB to be named one of the top green sustainable design firms in the upper Midwest. On the national level, Rick has served on the LEED for Homes, technical advisory group.

Carter, an accredited professional since 2002, has been a supporter of USGBC for over 14 years, and LHB has been a member since 1997, one of the first member firms in Minnesota. In addition, he has contributed his expertise to help create guidelines in the state that support the principles of sustainable design such as the Hennepin County Sustainable Guidelines, the State of Minnesota’s B3 Guidelines and the State’s benchmarking and Sustainable Building 2030 guidelines. Carter also contributes to the advancement of green building through the creation and teaching in the Master of Science in Sustainable Design program at the University of Minnesota.

In addition to his active professional endeavors, Carter is recognized for his participation and continual development of LHB’s philosophy to maintain accountability through sustainable design with measurable outcomes. Carter helped to develop LHB’s Performance Metrics™ system that determines actual returns on investment for clients interested in sustainable design. Carter has been integral on many of LHB’s projects that have significantly advanced sustainable design in the region including two, National AIA COTE Top Ten award projects. He currently leads LHB’s effort to create case studies for the Minnesota Sustainable 2030 policy, a cutting edge, national, model working towards designing zero carbon buildings.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering and architectural firm with 160 employees, with offices throughout the Midwest. Founded in 1966, we serve a broad range of market sectors including Public Works and Structures, Pipeline, Industrial, Housing, Healthcare, Government, Education, and Commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visit LHBcorp.com.

+  LHB Receives Excellence in Green Busines..., July 28, 2011

LHB Receives Excellence in Green Business Award

July 28, 2011

Duluth, Minn. (July 28, 2011) – The Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce along with the U.S. Green Building Council – Minnesota Chapter (USGBC-Minnesota) announced the recipients of the inaugural Leadership in Sustainability Awards. The Leadership in Sustainability Awards recognizes excellence in sustainability and direct community affect, as well as superior internal green business practices. The partnership with the Greening your Business Conference was a natural fit for recognize local organizations for their efforts in sustainability.

The Excellence in Green Business award recognizes an organization that has deliberately embedded sustainability in their organizational mission. LHB uses a tool called Performance Metrics™ to understand the actual impact of the buildings they have designed. Such post-occupancy evaluations are rare – and potentially risky. LHB is currently taking that risk by assessing over 75 of the buildings designed between 1996 and today.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Staff News, July 18, 2011

LHB Staff News

July 18, 2011

Duluth, Minn. (July 18, 2011) – LHB, Inc. is pleased to announce the addition of the following new employees to our Duluth and Minneapolis offices:

Samuel Jacobson, joins our Information Technology Group as a Network Administrator

Craig Churchward, joins our Urban Design + Planning Group as a Landscape Architect Project Manager

Corey Dahlin, joins our Public Works Group as a Civil Designer

Joel Hinnenkamp, joins our Public Works Group as a Civil Designer

Jered Parmeter, joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician

Jeremy Hennessey, joins our Duluth Office as an Engineering Technician

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218.279.2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB Employees Create Interior Design and..., May 19, 2011

LHB Employees Create Interior Design and Presentation Textbook

May 19, 2011

 

Duluth/Minneapolis, Minn. (May 19, 2011) – LHB architects Daniel Stine, CAD Administrator, and Steve McNeill, Director of Design, authored the recently published textbook, Interior Design Using Hand Sketching, SketchUp, and Photoshop. Available through Amazon.com, this book demonstrates to interior design students and professionals the importance of hand sketching and digital visualization tools by showing how they are used together in a modern interior design practice. Stine and McNeill’s techniques described in the textbook are integrated into LHB training seminars for design staff. This textbook follows Stine and McNeill’s last book, Chapters in Architectural Drawing: Hand Sketching in a Digital World.

Stine has 19 years of design experience and is a registered architect in Wisconsin. He trains LHB’s staff in Computer Aided Drafting and Building Information Modeling (CAD/BIM). Stine also teaches these topics as an adjunct instructor at Lake Superior College. Stine has written the following textbooks: Commercial Design Using AutoCAD, Residential Design using AutoCAD, Commercial Design using Revit Architecture, andResidential Design using Revit Architecture.

McNeill’s 39 years of design experience have been dedicated to enhancing the architecture profession. He is a past chair and former board member of the Minnesota Architectural Foundation and a past president of the Minnesota Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. His research on high performance practices in Switzerland and Germany helped create “Sustainable Schools Minnesota” for the Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB in Engineering News-Record’s (..., May 12, 2011

LHB in Engineering News-Record’s (ENR) Top 500 Design Firms List

May 12, 2011

DULUTH, Minn. (May 12, 2011) – LHB was recently listed in the ENR Top 500 Design Firms List. The list is published annually in the spring and ranks the 500 largest U.S.-based designs firms, both publicly and privately held, based on design-specific revenue.

Engineering News-Record provides international news, analysis, commentary, and data for contractors, project owners, engineers, architects, government regulators, and industry suppliers. ENR connects diverse sectors of the industry and covers issues such as business management, design, construction methods, technology, safety, law, legislation, environment, and labor.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Bill Bennett at 218 279-2450, Bill.Bennett@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB’s Red Lake Falls Project Recei..., April 21, 2011

LHB’s Red Lake Falls Project Receives Two Engineering Awards

April 21, 2011

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (April 21, 2011) – LHB and the city of Red Lake Falls were awarded the 2011 ACEC/MN Honor Award and the MnSPE 2011 Seven Wonders of Engineering Merit Award for the Red Lake Falls Water Treatment Facility.

The awards recognize special engineering aspects of the facility’s design. Settlement issues had plagued Red Lake Falls’ former Water Treatment Plant. In 2008, erosion threatened to consume the facility, placing the city in jeopardy of losing their only source of potable water. LHB was hired by the city to design a new water treatment plant, constructed near the city’s new water tower, in a mostly residential area of town. The city desired a low maintenance building with a metal roof that required the incorporation of  alternative truss construction. The new facility exceeded the city’s expectations. Red Lake Falls now has a facility with a secure source of drinking water that blends into the community’s rural residential surrounding. In addition, LHB helped the city obtain a low interest loan and a grant that paid for approximately 84% of the total project costs.

The American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) contributes to America’s prosperity and welfare by advancing the business interests of member firms within the engineering industry. The Minnesota Society of Professional Engineers (MnSPE) represents and serves the needs of Minnesota’s engineers working in private practice, industry, construction, government, and education, and is the only organization that represents engineers in all disciplines.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in: public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial design. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visitwww.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB’s Tu-Anh Bui Receives National..., March 11, 2011

LHB’s Tu-Anh Bui Receives National 2011 AIA Associates Award

March 11, 2011

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (March 11, 2011)  Tu-Anh Bui, Associate AIA at LHB, won the top national award given to individual associate AIA members in 2011. An AIA Associate and Designer for seven years, Tu-Anh is an outstanding leader in both the architectural profession and community. This award recognizes her extraordinary commitment to leadership and social activism locally, regionally, and nationally. At LHB, Tu-Anh focuses on her passion for designing high-quality affordable homes for all. She supplements this by advocating for the homeless through her volunteer work with Architecture for Humanity Minnesota and AIA Minnesota’s Housing Advocacy Committee. Tu-Anh’s role as AIA National Associate Committee Knowledge Director provides an opportunity for her to lead as an emerging professional on the national level.

“Tu-Anh is a creative powerhouse, strongly committed to making the world a better place through her commitment to architecture. She leads by example and lives a life that inspires,” Beverly Hauschild-Baron, AIA MN Executive Vice President, wrote in her nomination letter. Tu-Anh will be recognized in an awards ceremony at the 2011 AIA Convention in New Orleans this May.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in: public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  SAGE Electrochromics breaks ground for a..., February 16, 2011

SAGE Electrochromics breaks ground for a new High Volume Manufacturing facility

February 16, 2011

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (February 16, 2011) – Dynamic glass developer SAGE Electrochromics has broken ground on the world’s first large-scale electrochromic glass manufacturing facility which is expected to bring more than 160 new green technology jobs and 200 construction jobs to the area. The new eco-friendly High Volume Manufacturing (HVM-1) facility project is designed and spearheaded by LHB.

SAGE manufactures the world’s most energy-efficient window glass. SageGlass® is an electronically tintable glass for use in windows and skylights in buildings. The glass can be switched from clear to darkly tinted at the touch of a button or programmed to respond to changing sunlight and heat conditions. This revolutionary technology significantly reduces energy consumption and associated costs.

SAGE and LHB are pursuing LEED-NC Silver Certification for HVM-1, which means the facility will be energy efficient, high performance, and constructed utilizing environmentally friendly building practices. The HVM-1 building will be completed in 2011, and plant start-up will occur in 2012. SAGE and LHB designed the HVM-1 facility to fit into its existing environment and incorporate innovative features that improve each employee’s daily experience.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering, architecture, and planning firm known for its design leadership and loyalty to clients. LHB goes beyond good intentions and focuses on measurable performance. They are experts in: public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for their clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.

+  LHB welcomes Craig Churchward, ASLA, January 7, 2011

LHB welcomes Craig Churchward, ASLA

January 7, 2011

 

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (January 7, 2011) – LHB is pleased to announce the addition of Craig Churchward, ASLA, Transportation Landscape Architect, to its Minneapolis office. Craig has over 30 years of national experience developing highways that are sensitive to the environment and social fabric of the communities they serve.  He is leading a research study for the National Academy of Science on how state departments of transportation can improve their methods for conducting visual impact assessments.  A member of the Transportation Research Board’s Committee on Landscape and Environmental Design, Craig serves on a panel overseeing research into how highway rights-of-way can contribute to biomass production and carbon sequestration. He co-authored the chapter Context Sensitive Solutions—a method for working with communities and regulatory agencies to develop complex and controversial highways—in Landscape Architectural Graphic Standards.

Prior to LHB, Craig managed the visual character of several award-winning projects in Salt Lake City (Legacy Parkway), Indianapolis (Accelerate I-465), Toledo (I-75/I-475 Interchange), Dallas (NTTA), and Charlotte (NCTA) as National Director of Context Sensitive Solutions for one of the nation’s largest consulting engineering firms.  While working for Mn/DOT he authored a Visual Impact Assessment (VIA) process used across the country to assess visual impacts for highways, dams, pipelines, and wind farms.  His work for Mn/DOT included the architectural treatments of bridges in Cloquet, Mantorville, Sauk Rapids, and Bemidji. He also defined the visual character of the recent reconstruction of I-35W in Minneapolis and Richfield. Craig managed the planning for the reconstruction of The Edge of the Wilderness Scenic Byway through Chippewa National Forest north of Grand Rapids, and developed a plan to preserve the character of Historic Route 66 in Illinois. He was an adjunct faculty member, teaching landscape architecture design and theory at the University of Minnesota, for 19 years and has lectured at universities and professional meetings throughout the United States.

LHB is a multi-disciplinary engineering architecture, and planning firm known for our design leadership and loyalty to our clients. We go beyond good intentions and focus on measurable performance. We are experts in: public works, pipeline, industrial, housing, healthcare, government, education, and commercial. LHB is dedicated to being environmentally responsible, reducing long term operating costs, and improving the quality of life for our clients. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Rick Carter at 612.752.6923, Rick.Carter@LHBcorp.com or visit www.lhbcorp.com.